A Queer History of the Ballet

A Queer History of the Ballet

Also including a consideration of how ballet’s queer tradition has been memorialized by such contemporary dance-makers as Neumeier, Bausch, Bourne, and Preljocaj, this is an essential book in the study of ballet and queer history.

Author: Peter Stoneley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135872434

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 980

Designed for students, scholars and general readers with an interest in dance and queer history, A Queer History of the Ballet focuses on how, as makers and as audiences, queer men and women have helped to develop many of the texts, images, and legends of ballet. Presenting a series of historical case studies, the book explores the ways in which, from the nineteenth century into the twentieth, ballet has been a means of conjuring homosexuality – of enabling some degree of expression and visibility for people who were otherwise declared illegal and obscene. Studies include: the perverse sororities of the Romantic ballet the fairy in folklore, literature, and ballet Tchaikovsky and the making of Swan Lake Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes and the emergence of queer modernity the formation of ballet in America the queer uses of the prima ballerina Genet’s writings for and about ballet. Also including a consideration of how ballet’s queer tradition has been memorialized by such contemporary dance-makers as Neumeier, Bausch, Bourne, and Preljocaj, this is an essential book in the study of ballet and queer history.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Routledge Dance Studies Reader

The Routledge Dance Studies Reader

Choreographing History, Bloomington: Indiana UP. Jordan, S. (2000) Moving Music: Dialogues with Music in Twentieth Century Ballet, London: Dance Books. ... Stoneley, P. (2006) A Queer History of the Ballet, London: Routledge.

Author: Alexandra Carter

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415485982

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 405

View: 128

Represents the range and diversity of writings on dance from the mid to late 20th century, providing contemporary perspectives on ballet, modern dance, postmodern 'movement performance' jazz and ethnic dance.
Categories: Performing Arts

Queer Dance

Queer Dance

17. addresses both points in A Queer History of the Ballet (New York: Routledge, 2007), 93–124, while art historian Jonathan Weinberg focuses solely on the visual connections between the painting and ballet in Speaking for Vice: ...

Author: Clare Croft

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199377336

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 336

View: 750

If we imagine multiple ways of being together, how might that shift choreographic practices and help us imagine ways groups assemble in more varied ways than just pairing another man with another woman? How might dancing queerly ask us to imagine futures through something other than heterosexuality and reproduction? How does challenging gender binaries always mean thinking about race, thinking about the postcolonial, about ableism? What are the arbitrary rules structuring dance in all its arenas, whether concert and social or commercial and competition, and how do we see those invisible structures and work to disrupt them? Queer Dance brings together artists and scholars in a multi-platformed project-book, accompanying website, and live performance series to ask, "How does dancing queerly progressively challenge us?" The artists and scholars whose writing appears in the book and whose performances and filmed interviews appear online stage a range of genders and sexualities that challenge and destabilize social norms. Engaging with dance making, dance scholarship, queer studies, and other fields, Queer Dance asks how identities, communities, and artmaking and scholarly practices might consider what queer work the body does and can do. There is great power in claiming queerness in the press of bodies touching or in the exceeding of the body best measured in sweat and exhaustion. How does queerness exist in the realm of affect and touch, and what then might we explore about queerness through these pleasurable and complex bodily ways of knowing?
Categories: Performing Arts

Turning Pointe

Turning Pointe

Peter Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (New York: Routledge, 2017), 9. 4. Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet, 9. 5. Judith Lynne Hanna, Dance, Sex and Gender: Signs of Identity, Dominance, Defiance, and Desire (Chicago: ...

Author: Chloe Angyal

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781645036722

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 991

A reckoning with one of our most beloved art forms, whose past and present are shaped by gender, racial, and class inequities—and a look inside the fight for its future Every day, in dance studios all across America, legions of little children line up at the barre to take ballet class. This time in the studio shapes their lives, instilling lessons about gender, power, bodies, and their place in the world both in and outside of dance. In Turning Pointe, journalist Chloe Angyal captures the intense love for ballet that so many dancers feel, while also grappling with its devastating shortcomings: the power imbalance of an art form performed mostly by women, but dominated by men; the impossible standards of beauty and thinness; and the racism that keeps so many people of color out of ballet. As the rigid traditions of ballet grow increasingly out of step with the modern world, a new generation of dancers is confronting these issues head on, in the studio and on stage. For ballet to survive the twenty-first century and forge a path into a more socially just future, this reckoning is essential.
Categories: Performing Arts

Making Ballet American

Making Ballet American

Peter Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (New York: Routledge, 2007), 94–95; 95–98. Kirstein, Mosaic, 39; Thirty Years, 4. Kirstein was quoting Cocteau in his usage of the “red-and-gold disease.” Kirstein, Blast at Ballet, 200.

Author: Andrea Harris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190265809

Category: Music

Page: 240

View: 552

George Balanchine's arrival in the United States in 1933, it is widely thought, changed the course of ballet history by creating a bold neoclassical style that is celebrated as the first American manifestation of the art form. In Making Ballet American, author Andrea Harris challenges this narrative by revealing the complex social, cultural, and political forces that actually shaped the construction of American neoclassical ballet. Situating American ballet within a larger context of modernisms, the book examines critical efforts to craft new, modernist ideas about the relevance of classical dancing for American society and democracy. Through cultural and choreographic analysis, it illustrates the evolution of modernist ballet during a turbulent historical period. Ultimately, the book argues that the Americanization of Balanchine's neoclassicism was not the inevitable outcome of his immigration or his creative genius, but rather a far more complicated story that pivots on the question of modern art's relationship to America and the larger world.
Categories: Music

Ballet Class

Ballet Class

A Queer History of the Ballet (London: Routledge, 2007). Sussman, Leila. “Anatomy of the Dance Company Boom, 1958–1980.” Dance Research Journal 16 (Autumn 1984): 23–28. Sussman, Leila. “Recruitment Patterns: Their Impact on Ballet and ...

Author: Melissa R. Klapper

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190908706

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 900

Surveying the state of American ballet in a 1913 issue of McClure's Magazine, author Willa Cather reported that few girls expressed any interest in taking ballet class and that those who did were hard-pressed to find anything other than dingy studios and imperious teachers. One hundred years later, ballet is everywhere. There are ballet companies large and small across the United States; ballet is commonly featured in film, television, literature, and on social media; professional ballet dancers are spokespeople for all kinds of products; nail polish companies market colors like "Ballet Slippers" and "Prima Ballerina;" and, most importantly, millions of American children have taken ballet class. Beginning with the arrival of Russian dancers like Anna Pavlova, who first toured the United States on the eve of World War I, Ballet Class: An American History explores the growth of ballet from an ancillary part of nineteenth-century musical theater, opera, and vaudeville to the quintessential extracurricular activity it is today, pursued by countless children nationwide and an integral part of twentieth-century American childhood across borders of gender, class, race, and sexuality. A social history, Ballet Class takes a new approach to the very popular subject of ballet and helps ground an art form often perceived to be elite in the experiences of regular, everyday people who spent time in barre-lined studios across the United States. Drawing on a wide variety of materials, including children's books, memoirs by professional dancers and choreographers, pedagogy manuals, and dance periodicals, in addition to archival collections and oral histories, this pathbreaking study provides a deeply-researched national perspective on the history and significance of recreational ballet class in the United States and its influence on many facets of children's lives, including gender norms, consumerism, body image, children's literature, extracurricular activities, and popular culture.
Categories: Performing Arts

Nijinsky

Nijinsky

40 'looked up to him': C. W. Beaumont, The Diaghilev Ballet in London (London, 1940), p. 8. ... 41 'part of history': Nijinsky, Nijinsky's Diary, p. ... 43 'my greatest': P. Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (London, 2007), p. 58.

Author: Lucy Moore

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 9781847658289

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 644

'He achieves the miraculous,' the sculptor Auguste Rodin wrote of dancer Vaslav Nijinsky. 'He embodies all the beauty of classical frescoes and statues'. Like so many since, Rodin recognised that in Nijinsky classical ballet had one of the greatest and most original artists of the twentieth century, in any genre. Immersed in the world of dance from his childhood, he found his natural home in the Imperial Theatre and the Ballets Russes, he had a powerful sponsor in Sergei Diaghilev - until a dramatic and public failure ended his career and set him on a route to madness. As a dancer, he was acclaimed as godlike for his extraordinary grace and elevation, but the opening of Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring saw furious brawls between admirers of his radically unballetic choreography and horrified traditionalists. Nijinsky's story has lost none of its power to shock, fascinate and move. Adored and reviled in his lifetime, his phenomenal talent was shadowed by schizophrenia and an intense but destructive relationship with his lover, Diaghilev. 'I am alive' he wrote in his diary, 'and so I suffer'. In the first biography for forty years, Lucy Moore examines a career defined by two forces - inspired performance and an equally headline-grabbing talent for controversy, which tells us much about both genius and madness. This is the full story of one of the greatest figures of the twentieth century, comparable to the work of Rosamund Bartlett or Sjeng Scheijen.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

When Men Dance Choreographing Masculinities Across Borders

When Men Dance Choreographing Masculinities Across Borders

The sea change that promises refreshing breezes in dance studies can perhaps be glimpsed succinctly in the following book endorsement for A Queer History of the Ballet, from choreographer Mark Morris: "Queers in ballet?

Author: Jennifer Fisher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199739462

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 269

While dance has always been as demanding as contact sports, intuitive boundaries distinguish the two forms of performance for men. Dance is often regarded as a feminine activity, and men who dance are frequently stereotyped as suspect, gay, or somehow unnatural. But what really happens when men dance? When Men Dance offers a progressive vision that boldly articulates double-standards in gender construction within dance and brings hidden histories to light in a globalized debate. A first of its kind, this trenchant look at the stereotypes and realities of male dancing brings together contributions from leading and rising scholars of dance from around the world to explore what happens when men dance. The dancing male body emerges in its many contexts, from the ballet, modern, and popular dance worlds to stages in Georgian and Victorian England, Weimar Germany, India and the Middle East. The men who dance and those who analyze them tell stories that will be both familiar and surprising for insiders and outsiders alike.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas

In A Queer History of the Ballet Peter Stoneley argues that the consolidation of Balanchine's neoclassicism after 1948 “meant the foreclosing of other, more obviously queer possibilities” (Stoneley 2007: 115).

Author: Kathryn Bosher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191637339

Category: History

Page: 984

View: 668

The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas is the first edited collection to discuss the performance of Greek drama across the continents and archipelagos of the Americas from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present. The study and interpretation of the classics have never been restricted by geographical or linguistic boundaries but, in the case of the Americas, long colonial histories have often imposed such boundaries arbitrarily. This volume tracks networks across continents and oceans and uncovers the ways in which the shared histories and practices in the performance arts in the Americas have routinely defied national boundaries. With contributions from classicists, Latin American specialists, theatre and performance theorists, and historians, the Handbook also includes interviews with key writers, including Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott, Charles Mee, and Anne Carson, and leading theatre directors such as Peter Sellars, Carey Perloff, Héctor Daniel-Levy, and Heron Coelho. This richly illustrated volume seeks to define the complex contours of the reception of Greek drama in the Americas, and to articulate how these different engagements - at local, national, or trans-continental levels, as well as across borders - have been distinct both from each other, and from those of Europe and Asia.
Categories: History

The Fascist Turn in the Dance of Serge Lifar

The Fascist Turn in the Dance of Serge Lifar

LIFAR ' S LEGS Those who wished to maintain a purist definition of neoclassicism wedding modernity to the seventeenth century in the idea that ballets principles of origin were to be found there in their most pristine form characterized ...

Author: Mark Franko

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197503348

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 113

Ukrainian dancer and choreographer Serge Lifar (1905-86) is recognized both as the modernizer of French ballet in the twentieth century and as the keeper of the flame of the classical tradition upon which the glory of French ballet was founded. Having migrated to France from Russia in 1923 to join Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, Lifar was appointed star dancer and ballet director at the Paris Opéra in 1930. Despite being rather unpopular with the French press at the start of his appointment, Lifar came to dominate the Parisian dance scene-through his publications as well as his dancing and choreography-until the end of the Second World War, reaching the height of his fame under the German occupation of Paris (1940-44). Rumors of his collaborationism having remained inconclusive throughout the postwar era, Lifar retired in 1958. This book not only reassesses Lifar's career, both aesthetically and politically, but also provides a broader reevaluation of the situation of dance-specifically balletic neoclassicism-in the first half of the twentieth century. The Fascist Turn in the Dance of Serge Lifar is the first book not only to discuss the resistance to Lifar in the French press at the start of his much-mythologized career, but also the first to present substantial evidence of Lifar's collaborationism and relate it to his artistic profile during the preceding decade. In examining the political significance of the critical discussion of Lifar's body and technique, author Mark Franko provides the ground upon which to understand the narcissistic and heroic images of Lifar in the 1930s as prefiguring the role he would play in the occupation. Through extensive archival research into unpublished documents of the era, police reports, the transcript of his postwar trial and rarely cited newspaper columns Lifar wrote, Franko reconstructs the dancer's political activities, political convictions, and political ambitions during the Occupation.
Categories: Performing Arts

Literature Modernism and Dance

Literature  Modernism  and Dance

Balanchine, the Russian choreographer who began his career with the Ballets Russes, created this ballet for Diaghilev's company, and it was first ... see Peter Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (London: Routledge, 2006), 98–104.

Author: Susan Jones

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191009433

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 705

This book explores the complex relationship between literature and dance in the era of modernism. During this period an unprecedented dialogue between the two art forms took place, based on a common aesthetics initiated by contemporary discussions of the body and gender, language, formal experimentation, primitivism, anthropology, and modern technologies such as photography, film, and mechanisation. The book traces the origins of this relationship to the philosophical antecedents of modernism in the nineteenth century and examines experimentation in both art forms. The book investigates dance's impact on the modernists' critique of language and shows the importance to writers of choreographic innovations by dancers of the fin de siècle, of the Ballets Russes, and of European and American experimentalists in non-balletic forms of modern dance. A reciprocal relationship occurs with choreographic use of literary text. Dance and literature meet at this time at the site of formal experiments in narrative, drama, and poetics, and their relationship contributes to common aesthetic modes such as symbolism, primitivism, expressionism, and constructivism. Focussing on the first half of the twentieth century, the book locates these transactions in a transatlantic field, giving weight to both European and American contexts and illustrating the importance of dance as a conduit of modernist preoccupations in Europe and the US through patterns of influence and exchange. Chapters explore the close interrelationships of writers and choreographers of this period including Mallarmé, Nietzsche, Yeats, Conrad, Woolf, Lawrence, Pound, Eliot, and Beckett, Fuller, Duncan, Fokine, Nijinsky, Massine, Nijinska, Balanchine, Tudor, Laban, Wigman, Graham, and Humphrey, and recover radical experiments by neglected writers and choreographers from David Garnett and Esther Forbes to Andrée Howard and Oskar Schlemmer.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Homintern

Homintern

Peter Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (London & New York: Routledge, 2007), p. 77. A much cruder account of the influence of the male dancers in the Ballets Russes runs as follows: 'Diaghilev's own homosexuality... left its ...

Author: Gregory Woods

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300234992

Category: Social Science

Page: 440

View: 737

A landmark account of gay and lesbian creative networks and the seismic changes they brought to twentieth-century culture In a hugely ambitious study which crosses continents, languages, and almost a century, Gregory Woods identifies the ways in which homosexuality has helped shape Western culture. Extending from the trials of Oscar Wilde to the gay liberation era, this book examines a period in which increased visibility made acceptance of homosexuality one of the measures of modernity. Woods shines a revealing light on the diverse, informal networks of gay people in the arts and other creative fields. Uneasily called “the Homintern” (an echo of Lenin’s “Comintern”) by those suspicious of an international homosexual conspiracy, such networks connected gay writers, actors, artists, musicians, dancers, filmmakers, politicians, and spies. While providing some defense against dominant heterosexual exclusion, the grouping brought solidarity, celebrated talent, and, in doing so, invigorated the majority culture. Woods introduces an enormous cast of gifted and extraordinary characters, most of them operating with surprising openness; but also explores such issues as artistic influence, the coping strategies of minorities, the hypocrisies of conservatism, and the effects of positive and negative discrimination. Traveling from Harlem in the 1910s to 1920s Paris, 1930s Berlin, 1950s New York and beyond, this sharply observed, warm-spirited book presents a surpassing portrait of twentieth-century gay culture and the men and women who both redefined themselves and changed history.
Categories: Social Science

Bernstein Meets Broadway

Bernstein Meets Broadway

Fancy Free, Ballet Theatre Orchestra, conducted by Leonard Bernstein, Decca Records DA-406, 1946. ... of Spectacle in Times Square (New York: Random House, 2006); Peter Stoneley, A Queer History of the Ballet (London: Routledge, 2007).

Author: Carol J. Oja

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199862108

Category: Music

Page: 368

View: 841

Winner of the 2015 Music in American Culture Award from the American Musicological Society When Leonard Bernstein first arrived in New York City, he was an unknown artist working with other brilliant twentysomethings, notably Jerome Robbins, Betty Comden, and Adolph Green. By the end of the 1940s, these artists were world famous. Their collaborations defied artistic boundaries and subtly pushed a progressive political agenda, altering the landscape of musical theater, ballet, and nightclub comedy. In Bernstein Meets Broadway: Collaborative Art in a Time of War, award-winning author and scholar Carol J. Oja examines the early days of Bernstein's career during World War II, centering around the debut in 1944 of the Broadway musical On the Town and the ballet Fancy Free. As a composer and conductor, Bernstein experienced a meteoric rise to fame, thanks in no small part to his visionary colleagues. Together, they focused on urban contemporary life and popular culture, featuring as heroes the itinerant sailors who bore the brunt of military service. They were provocative both artistically and politically. In a time of race riots and Japanese internment camps, Bernstein and his collaborators featured African American performers and a Japanese American ballerina, staging a model of racial integration. Rather than accepting traditional distinctions between high and low art, Bernstein's music was wide-open, inspired by everything from opera and jazz to cartoons. Oja shapes a wide-ranging cultural history that captures a tumultuous moment in time. Bernstein Meets Broadway is an indispensable work for fans of Broadway musicals, dance, and American performance history.
Categories: Music

Drag Histories Herstories and Hairstories

Drag Histories  Herstories and Hairstories

In Kath Browne and Catherine J. Nash (eds), Queer Methods and Methodologies: Intersecting Queer Theories and Social Science Research. ... Stoneley , P. ( 2007 ) A Queer History of the Ballet. London : Routledge .

Author: Mark Edward

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350104389

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 963

Drawing on rich interdisciplinary research that has laced the emerging subject of drag studies as an academic discipline, this book examines how drag performance is a political, socio-cultural practice with a widespread lineage throughout the history of performance. This volume maps the multi-threaded contexts of contemporary practices while rooting them in their fabulous historical past and memory. The book examines drag histories and what drag does with history, how it enacts or tells stories about remembering and the past. Featuring work about the USA, UK and Ireland, Japan, Australia, Brazil and Barbados, this book allows the reader to engage with a range of archival research including camp and history; ethnicity and drag; queering ballet through drag; the connections between drag king and queen history; queering pantomime performance; drag and military veterans; Puerto Rican drag performers and historical film.
Categories: Performing Arts

Popular Culture Global Intercultural Perspectives

Popular Culture  Global Intercultural Perspectives

A number of studies have focused on dance and masculinities, including: Dancing Desires (Desmond 2001), The Queer Afterlife of Nijinsky (Kopelson 1997) and A Queer History of the Ballet (Stoneley, 2007). Celebrity has been a feature of ...

Author: Ann Brooks

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137159564

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 408

Through popular culture, we can define, explore and experiment with our identities. This vibrant text provides an understanding of popular culture in a globalized world through the intersection of sociology and cultural studies, combining cultural theory with a wide range of examples from everyday life, including fashion, social networking and music, drawn from the United States, the UK and the Asia-Pacific.
Categories: Social Science

Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History

Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History

A Queer History of the Ballet. London: Routledge, 2007. Strange, Carolyn. Toronto 's Girl Problem: The Perils and Pleasures of the City, 1880— 1930. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995. Strange, Carolyn.

Author: Patrizia Gentile

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442613874

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 428

View: 980

In this first collection on the history of the body in Canada, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the multiple ways the body has served as a site of contestation in Canadian history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Categories: Health & Fitness

The Routledge Companion to Media and Fairy Tale Cultures

The Routledge Companion to Media and Fairy Tale Cultures

five-hour extravaganza Ballet Comique de la Reine of 1581) through the “sheer magnitude of theatrical spectacle” that ... Peter Stoneley argues for a “queer history of ballet,” arguing that “ballet provided images, legends, spaces, ...

Author: Pauline Greenhill

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317368793

Category: Social Science

Page: 664

View: 487

From Cinderella to comic con to colonialism and more, this companion provides readers with a comprehensive and current guide to the fantastic, uncanny, and wonderful worlds of the fairy tale across media and cultures. It offers a clear, detailed, and expansive overview of contemporary themes and issues throughout the intersections of the fields of fairy-tale studies, media studies, and cultural studies, addressing, among others, issues of reception, audience cultures, ideology, remediation, and adaptation. Examples and case studies are drawn from a wide range of pertinent disciplines and settings, providing thorough, accessible treatment of central topics and specific media from around the globe.
Categories: Social Science

Men Masculinities and Sexualities in Dance

Men  Masculinities and Sexualities in Dance

Negotiating the Gay Male Stereotype in Ballet and Modern Dance. ... Theatre Under Louis XIV: Cross-Casting and the Performance of Gender in Drama, Ballet and Opera. Palgrave Macmillan. ... A Queer History of the Ballet. Routledge.

Author: Andria Christofidou

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030772185

Category:

Page:

View: 637

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The Routledge Dance Studies Reader

The Routledge Dance Studies Reader

Choreographing History, Bloomington: Indiana UP. Jordan, S. (2000) Moving Music: Dialogues with Music in Twentieth Century Ballet, London: Dance Books. ... Stoneley, P. (2006) A Queer History of the Ballet, London: Routledge.

Author: Jens Richard Giersdorf

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135173487

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 406

View: 840

The second edition of The Routledge Dance Studies Reader offers fresh critical perspectives on classic and modern dance forms, including ballroom, tango, Hip-hop, site-specific performance, and disability in dance. Alexandra Carter and Janet O’Shea deliver a substantially revised and updated collection of key texts, featuring an enlightening new introduction, which tracks differing approaches to dance studies. Important articles from the first edition are accompanied by twenty new works by leading critical voices. The articles are presented in five thematic sections, each with a new editorial introduction and further reading. Sections cover: Making dance Performing dance Ways of looking Locating dance in history and society Debating the discipline The Routledge Dance Studies Reader gives readers access to over thirty essential texts on dance and provides expert guidance on their critical context. It is a vital resource for anyone interested in understanding dance from a global and contemporary perspective.
Categories: Performing Arts

Performance and Professional Wrestling

Performance and Professional Wrestling

Peter Stonley, A Queer History of the Ballet (London and New York: Routledge, 2007), 10. Ibid., 14. A. Oppliger Patrice, Wrestling and Hypermasculinity (Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland, 2003), ...

Author: Broderick Chow

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317385073

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 226

View: 670

Performance and Professional Wrestling is the first edited volume to consider professional wrestling explicitly from the vantage point of theatre and performance studies. Moving beyond simply noting its performative qualities or reading it via other performance genres, this collection of essays offers a complete critical reassessment of the popular sport. Topics such as the suspension of disbelief, simulation, silence and speech, physical culture, and the performance of pain within the squared circle are explored in relation to professional wrestling, with work by both scholars and practitioners grouped into seven short sections: Audience Circulation Lucha Gender Queerness Bodies Race A significant re-reading of wrestling as a performing art, Performance and Professional Wrestling makes essential reading for scholars and students intrigued by this uniquely theatrical sport.
Categories: Performing Arts