An Intimate Distance

An Intimate Distance

A feminist reclamation of these images suggests how the permeable boundaries between the female body and technology, nature and culture are being crossed in the work of women artists.

Author: Rosemary Betterton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136155628

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 293

An Intimate Distance considers a wide range of visual images of women in the context of current debates which centre around the body, including reproductive science, questions of ageing and death and the concept of 'body horror' in relation to food, consumption and sex. A feminist reclamation of these images suggests how the permeable boundaries between the female body and technology, nature and culture are being crossed in the work of women artists.
Categories: Art

An Intimate Distance

An Intimate Distance

Drawing on recent theories of embodiment developed within feminist philosophy and psychoanalytic theory, the essays reveal how the permeable boundaries between nature and culture, the female body and technology are being crossed in the work ...

Author: Rosemary Betterton

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 041511084X

Category: Architecture

Page: 240

View: 476

How have women artists taken possession of the female body? What is the relationship between looking and embodiment in art made by women? In a series of original readings of the work of artists from Kathe Kollwitz and Georgia O'Keeffe to Helen Chadwick and Laura Godfrey-Isaacs, Rosemary Betterton explores how women artists have addressed the changing relationship between women, the body and its representation in art. In detailed critical essays that range from the analysis of maternal imagery in the work of German artists at the turn of the century to the unrepresented body in contemporary abstract painting, Betterton argues that women's art practices offer new ways of engaging with our fascinations with and fears about the female body. Reflecting the shift within feminist art over the last decade, An Intimate Distance sets the reinscription of the body within women's art practice in the context of current debates on the body, including reproductive science, maternal subjectivity and the concept of 'body horror' in relation to food, ageing and sex. Drawing on recent theories of embodiment developed within feminist philosophy and psychoanalytic theory, the essays reveal how the permeable boundaries between nature and culture, the female body and technology are being crossed in the work of women artists.
Categories: Architecture

An Intimate Distance

An Intimate Distance

Author: Rosemary Betterton

Publisher:

ISBN: 0756763606

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 318

How have women artists taken possession of the female body? What is the relationship between looking & embodiment in art made by women? In a series of original readings of the work of artists from Kathe Kollwitz & Georgia O'Keeffe to Helen Chadwick & Laura Godfrey Issacs, Betterton explores how women artists have addressed the changing relationship between women, the body & its representation in art. Women's art practices offer new ways of engaging with our fascinations & fears of the female body. Drawing on theories of embodiment, the essays reveal how the boundaries between nature & culture, the female body & technology are being crossed in the work of women artists. 50 illustrations.
Categories: Art

Addiction and British Visual Culture 1751 919

 Addiction and British Visual Culture  1751 919

The woman's smile does not signify motherly devotion and adoration, but rather the emotional affects of alcohol. ... 6 See, for instance, Rosemary Betterton, An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and the Body (New York and London: ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351577489

Category: Art

Page: 200

View: 586

Highly innovative and long overdue, this study analyzes the visual culture of addiction produced in Britain during the long nineteenth century. The book examines well-known images such as William Hogarth's Gin Lane (1751), as well as lesser-known artworks including Alfred Priest's painting Cocaine (1919), in order to demonstrate how visual culture was both informed by, and contributed to, discourses of addiction in the period between 1751 and 1919. Through her analysis of more than 30 images, Julia Skelly deconstructs beliefs and stereotypes related to addicted individuals that remain entrenched in the popular imagination today. Drawing upon both feminist and queer methodologies, as well as upon extensive archival research, Addiction and British Visual Culture, 1751-1919 investigates and problematizes the long-held belief that addiction is legible from the body, thus positioning visual images as unreliable sources in attempts to identify alcoholics and drug addicts. Examining paintings, graphic satire, photographs, advertisements and architectural sites, Skelly explores such issues as ongoing anxieties about maternal drinking; the punishment and confinement of addicted individuals; the mobility of female alcoholics through the streets and spaces of nineteenth-century London; and soldiers' use of addictive substances such as cocaine and tobacco to cope with traumatic memories following the First World War.
Categories: Art

Feminist Visual Culture

Feminist Visual Culture

Body Politic: Female Sexuality and Women Artists Since 1970« in Parker and Pollock, Framing Feminism, pp. 266 and 272. 17. Betterton, An Intimate Distance, ch. 6 and especially p. 138. 18. M. Whitford (ed.) ...

Author: Fiona Carson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136708602

Category: Art

Page: 336

View: 766

First Published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Art

Reconciling Art and Mothering

Reconciling Art and Mothering

Betterton, Rosemary. An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and the Body. New York and London: Routledge, 1996. — . “Bodies in the Work.” In An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and The Body. London and New York: Routledge, 1996, 79–105.

Author: RachelEpp Buller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351552011

Category: Art

Page: 340

View: 695

Reconciling Art and Mothering contributes a chorus of new voices to the burgeoning body of scholarship on art and the maternal and, for the first time, focuses exclusively on maternal representations and experiences within visual art throughout the world. This innovative essay collection joins the voices of practicing artists with those of art historians, acknowledging the fluidity of those categories. The twenty-five essays of Reconciling Art and Mothering are grouped into two sections, the first written by art historians and the second by artists. Art historians reflect on the work of artists addressing motherhood-including Marguerite G?rd, Chana Orloff, and Ren?Cox-from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Contributions by contemporary artist-mothers, such as Gail Rebhan, Denise Ferris, and Myrel Chernick, point to the influence of past generations of artist-mothers, to the inspiration found in the work of maternally minded literary and cultural theorists, and to attempts to broaden definitions of maternity. Working against a hegemonic construction of motherhood, the contributors discuss complex and diverse feminist mothering experiences, from maternal ambivalence to queer mothering to quests for self-fulfillment. The essays address mothering experiences around the globe, with contributors hailing from North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia.
Categories: Art

Radical Decadence

Radical Decadence

“Killing Joy: Feminism and the History of Happiness,” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 35, no. ... Food (and Sex and Death) in Women's Art,” in An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and the Body (New York and London: ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472569431

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 185

This pioneering book explores the notion of 'radical decadence' as concept, aesthetic and lived experience, and as an analytical framework for the study of contemporary feminist textile art. Gendered discourses of decadence that perpetuate anxieties about women's power, consumption and pleasure are deconstructed through images of drug use, female sexuality and 'excessive' living, in artworks by several contemporary textile artists including Orly Cogan, Tracey Emin, Allyson Mitchell, and Rozanne Hawksley. Perceptions of decadence are invariably bound to the negative connotations of decay and degradation, particularly with regard to the transgression of social norms related to femininity and the female body. Excessive consumption by women has historically been represented as grotesque, and until now, women's pleasure in relation to drug and alcohol use has largely gone unexamined in feminist art history and craft studies. Here, representations of female consumption, from cupcakes to alcohol and cocaine, are opened up for critical discussion. Drawing on feminist and queer theories, Julia Skelly considers portrayals of 'bad girls' in artworks that explore female sexuality - performative pieces designed to subvert and exceed feminine roles. In this provocative book, decadence is understood not as a destructive force but as a liberating aesthetic.
Categories: Social Science

The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600 010

 The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture  1600 010

22 Rosemary Betterton, “Body Horror?: Food (and Sex and Death) in Women's Art,” in An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and the Body (New York and London: Routledge, 1996), 131. See Rosemary Betterton, “'A Perfect Woman': The Political ...

Author: Julia Skelly

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351539746

Category: Art

Page: 326

View: 448

Directing unprecedented attention to how the idea of ?excess? has been used by both producers and consumers of visual and material culture, this collection examines the discursive construction of excess in relation to art, material goods and people in various global contexts. The contributors illuminate how excess has been perceived, quantified and constructed, revealing in the process how beliefs about excess have changed over time and how they have remained consistent. The collection as a whole underscores the fact that the concept of excess must always be considered critically, whether in scholarship or in lived experience. Although the idea of excess has often been used to shame and degrade, many of the essays in this collection demonstrate how it has also been used as a strategy for self-fashioning, transgression and empowerment, particularly by women and queer subjects. This volume examines a range of material, including diamonds, ceramics, paintings, dollhouses, caricatures, interior design and theatrical performances. Each case study sheds new light on how excess was used in a specific cultural context, including canonical sites of study such as the Netherlands in the eighteenth century, Victorian Britain and Paris in the 1920s, and under-studied contexts such as Canada and Sweden.
Categories: Art

The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture 1600 2010

The Uses of Excess in Visual and Material Culture  1600   2010

Rosemary Betterton, “Body Horror?: Food (and Sex and Death) in Women's Art,” in An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists and the Body (New York and London: Routledge, 1996), 131. See Rosemary Betterton, “'A Perfect Woman': The Political ...

Author: Ms Julia Skelly

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409442370

Category: Art

Page: 300

View: 397

Although the idea of excess has often been used to degrade, many of the essays in this collection demonstrate how it has also been used as a strategy for self-fashioning and empowerment, particularly by women and queer subjects. This volume examines a range of material - including ceramics, paintings, caricatures, interior design and theatrical performances - in various global contexts. Each case study sheds new light on how excess has been perceived and constructed, revealing how beliefs about excess have changed over time.
Categories: Art

Women Artists in Interwar France

Women Artists in Interwar France

On Paula Modersohn-Becker, see Rosemary Betterton, “Maternal Figures: The Maternal Nude in the Work of Käthe Kollwitz and Paula Modersohn-Becker,” in An Intimate Distance: Women, Artists, and the Body, ed.

Author: PaulaJ. Birnbaum

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351536714

Category: Art

Page: 358

View: 555

Women Artists in Interwar France: Framing Femininities illuminates the importance of the Soci? des Femmes Artists Modernes, more commonly known as FAM, and returns this group to its proper place in the history of modern art. In particular, this volume explores how FAM and its most famous members?Suzanne Valadon, Marie Laurencin, and Tamara de Lempicka?brought a new approach to the most prominent themes of female embodiment: the self-portrait, motherhood, and the female nude. These women reimagined art's conventions and changed the direction of both art history and the politics of their contemporary art world. FAM has been excluded from histories of modern art despite its prominence during the interwar years. Paula Birnbaum's study redresses this omission, contextualizing the group's legacy in light of the conservative politics of 1930s France. The group's artistic response to the reactionary views and images of women at the time is shown to be a key element in the narrative of modernist formalism. Although many FAM works are missing?one reason for the lack of attention paid to their efforts?Birnbaum's extensive research, through archives, press clippings, and first-hand interviews with artists' families, reclaims FAM as an important chapter in the history of art from the interwar years.
Categories: Art