Burmese Silver Art

Burmese Silver Art

The first publication in more than 100 years dedicated to the display and description of handcrafted Burmese silverwork from the "Burmese Silver Age"

Author: David C. Owens

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish International (Asia) Pte Limited

ISBN: 9814868884

Category: Art and mythology

Page: 216

View: 674

Burmese master silversmiths produced a magnificent body of work from the mid-19th to the early 20th centuries - the Burmese Silver Age. This aesthetic and functional work is characterized by a unique decorative style and superb technical artistry. Many of the artefacts are embellished with mysterious visual narratives drawn from ancient religious and mythological sources, communicating spiritual beliefs and values that resonate to this day. Burmese silverwork is a distinct and little-known genre of silver art. This book tackles this obscurity by illuminating and describing for the first time 100 Burmese silver artefacts in a stunning photographic gallery. This silverwork - from the Noble Silver Collection - represents some of the rarest and finest quality work from the Burmese Silver Age. The centerpiece gallery of silverwork masterpieces is bookended by two well-illustrated and informative chapters that provide readers with deeper insights into Burmese silverwork: a robust frame of reference chapter summarizes the 2,000-year history and cultural tradition of Burmese silverwork; and a chapter following the gallery deciphers the complex and allegorical iconography of the decoration, which gives the reader a deeper appreciation of its religious and cultural meaning and origin. This book captures the great, almost mystical, allure of Burmese silverwork - from the sublime artistry of the decoration, to the extraordinary skill of the silversmith and the profound meaning and importance of the visual narratives. In doing so, Burmese Silver Art takes its place as a definitive reference work for any art historian, collector, expert, student, or general reader interested in this hitherto-overlooked body of noble art.
Categories: Art and mythology

Burmese Silver Art Masterpieces Illuminating Buddhist Hindu and Mythological Stories of Purpose and Wisdom

Burmese Silver Art  Masterpieces Illuminating Buddhist  Hindu and Mythological Stories of Purpose and Wisdom

Burmese silverwork is a distinct and little-known genre of silver art. This book tackles this obscurity by illuminating and describing for the first time 100 Burmese silver artefacts in a stunning photographic gallery.

Author: David C. Owens

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish International Asia Pte Ltd

ISBN: 9789814893503

Category: Design

Page:

View: 906

Burmese master silversmiths produced a magnificent body of work from the mid-19th to the early 20th centuries – the Burmese Silver Age. This aesthetic and functional work is characterized by a unique decorative style and superb technical artistry. Many of the artefacts are embellished with mysterious visual narratives drawn from ancient religious and mythological sources, communicating spiritual beliefs and values that resonate to this day. Burmese silverwork is a distinct and little-known genre of silver art. This book tackles this obscurity by illuminating and describing for the first time 100 Burmese silver artefacts in a stunning photographic gallery. This silverwork – from the Noble Silver Collection – represents some of the rarest and finest quality work from the Burmese Silver Age. The centrepiece gallery of silverwork masterpieces is bookended by two well-illustrated and informative chapters that provide readers with deeper insights into Burmese silverwork: a robust frame of reference chapter summarises the 2,000-year history and cultural tradition of Burmese silverwork; and a chapter following the gallery deciphers the complex and allegorical iconography of the decoration, which gives the reader a deeper appreciation of its religious and cultural meaning and origin. This book captures the great, almost mystical, allure of Burmese silverwork – from the sublime artistry of the decoration, to the extraordinary skill of the silversmith and the profound meaning and importance of the visual narratives. In doing so, Burmese Silver Art takes its place as a definitive reference work for any art historian, collector, expert, student, or general reader interested in this hitherto-overlooked body of noble art.
Categories: Design

Burmese Silver from the Colonial Period

Burmese Silver from the Colonial Period

This stunning catalogue presents an exceptional collection of rare Burmese silver. Accompanied by detailed photographs and explanatory texts, this ground-breaking book proposes a new way of looking at Burmese silver.

Author: Alexandra Green

Publisher: Ad Ilissum

ISBN: 1912168278

Category:

Page: 256

View: 395

This stunning catalogue presents an exceptional collection of rare Burmese silver. Accompanied by detailed photographs and explanatory texts, this ground-breaking book proposes a new way of looking at Burmese silver. Names, dates, places, and stories - identifying the who, when, where, and what of Burmese silver has been the focus of publications on the topic. Are these questions the best way to understand silver, however? Alexandra Green argues that they are not. Too few pieces provide reliable information about silversmiths, production locations, and dates to allow for a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Instead, a close examination of silver patterns reveals strong links with Burmese art history reaching as far back as the Bagan period (11th to 13th centuries), connections with contemporary artistic trends, and participation within the wider world of silversmithing. The first European to write about Burmese silver was H L Tilly, a colonial official from the late 19th into the early 20th century. Tasked with collecting objects for various fairs and exhibitions, he took an interest in Burmese art, publishing articles and books from the 1880s onwards. While much of what he wrote was factually inaccurate and coloured by the prejudices and stereotypes common at the time, his two volumes on Burmese silver published in 1902 and 1904 contain pictures of pieces from the early to mid 19th century. These enable a reconstruction of how silver designs evolved as the country was absorbed into the Indian Raj, and British and other Westerners became consumers of local silver products. Tilly was also correct in his interest in silver designs. Green uses the visual information from his books to describe the continuities and innovations of designs found on silver from the mid 19th through the mid 20th century, and she places these trends within local, regional, and global flows of ideas. Many studies of Burmese silver have been plagued by a lack of understanding of the Burmese context. In contrast, Green examines silver from a local perspective, drawing on Burmese texts and information that allows for a nuanced view of the motifs, designs, and patterns that appear repetitively on silver pieces. Using Graham Honeybill's collection, formed over many years, as a basis, she explores how designs and patterns circulated around the country and were innovatively combined and recombined on pieces by silversmiths producing objects for Burmese, Western, and commercial clients.
Categories:

Journal of the Society of Arts

Journal of the Society of Arts

... who must have The art of encrusting copper and brass with had some part in the designing of these pieces silver and ... but the destroyed the art of the Burmese silversmith . artisans , feeling that something was wrong , The relief ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B2875624

Category: Arts

Page:

View: 472

Categories: Arts

Journal of the Royal Society of Arts

Journal of the Royal Society of Arts

The Burmese artist treats silver in the right way , obtaining the greatest possible effect that the nature of the material allows . The method employed by silversmiths in these works is — when giving his order the customer pays for the ...

Author: Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain)

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015012421023

Category: Industrial arts

Page:

View: 649

Categories: Industrial arts

Buddhist Visual Cultures Rhetoric and Narrative in Late Burmese Wall Paintings

Buddhist Visual Cultures  Rhetoric  and Narrative in Late Burmese Wall Paintings

Wicks, Robert S. “Telling Lives: Narrative Allegory on a Burmese Silver Bowl.” In Studies in Southeast Asian Art: Essays in Honor of Stanley J. O'Connor, edited by Nora A. Taylor, 158–71. Ithaca, NY: Southeast Asia Program Publications, ...

Author: Alexandra Green

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

ISBN: 9789888390885

Category: Art

Page: 248

View: 167

Step into a Burmese temple built between the late seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries and you are surrounded by a riot of color and imagery. The majority of the highly detailed wall paintings displays Buddhist biographical narratives, inspiring the devotees to follow the Buddha’s teachings. Alexandra Green goes one step further to consider the temples and their contents as a whole, arguing that the wall paintings mediate the relationship between the architecture and the main Buddha statues in the temples. This forges a unified space for the devotees to interact with the Buddha and his community, with the aim of transforming the devotees’ current and future lives. These temples were a cohesively articulated and represented Burmese Buddhist world to which the devotees belonged. Green’s visits to more than 160 sites with identifiable subject matter form the basis of this richly illustrated volume, which draws upon art historical, anthropological, and religious studies methodologies to analyze the wall paintings and elucidate the contemporary religious, political, and social concepts that drove the creation of this lively art form. “Buddhist Visual Cultures, Rhetoric, and Narrative in Late Burmese Wall Paintings is truly a tour de force that allows us to see Burmese temple paintings of the Life of the Buddha and similar themes as an open-ended genre that, like literary discourse, participates in wider social, intellectual, and religious contexts.” —Juliane Schober, Arizona State University “Alexandra Green introduces this relatively unknown material and subjects it to sophisticated analysis. This study is major step towards creating a template that could be used for analyzing other late traditions of Buddhist painting.” —Janice Leoshko, University of Texas at Austin
Categories: Art

The Journal of Indian Art

The Journal of Indian Art

The civilised Western world , however , is growing so prodigiously rich that it absorbs annually a larger quantity of the most costly products of the East than is generally believed , and it may be that the work of Burmese silver ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: BSB:BSB11471339

Category:

Page:

View: 183

Categories:

Eclectic Collecting

Eclectic Collecting

The collection of Burmese art housed at the Denison Museum in Granville, Ohio, USA, includes more than 1,500 objects dating from the late first millennium AD through the twentieth century.

Author: Alexandra Green

Publisher: NUS Press

ISBN: 9971694042

Category: Textile fabrics

Page: 256

View: 180

The collection of Burmese art housed at the Denison Museum in Granville, Ohio, USA, includes more than 1,500 objects dating from the late first millennium AD through the twentieth century. While particularly strong on textiles originating with minority groups in Burma, it also showcases Buddha images, lacquer objects, works on paper, manuscripts, wood carvings, and pieces made from bronze, silver, and ivory. Eclectic Collecting is both a catalogue of the collection and a scholarly examination of Burmese art.
Categories: Textile fabrics

Buddhist Art of Myanmar

Buddhist Art of Myanmar

Pagan: Art and Architecture of Old Burma. ... The Changing Nature of Conflict between Burma and Siam as Seen from the Growth and Development of Burmese States from the 16th to the 19th ... “Burmese Silver from the Colonial Period.” Arts ...

Author: Sylvia Fraser-Lu

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300209457

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 739

A stunning showcase of exceptional and rare works of Buddhist art, presented to the international community for the first time The practice of Buddhism in Myanmar (Burma) has resulted in the production of dazzling objects since the 5th century. This landmark publication presents the first overview of these magnificent works of art from major museums in Myanmar and collections in the United States, including sculptures, paintings, textiles, and religious implements created for temples and monasteries, or for personal devotion. Many of these pieces have never before been seen outside of Myanmar. Accompanied by brilliant color photography, essays by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Donald M. Stadtner, and scholars from around the world synthesize the history of Myanmar from the ancient through colonial periods and discuss the critical links between religion, geography, governance, historiography, and artistic production. The authors examine the multiplicity of styles and techniques throughout the country, the ways Buddhist narratives have been conveyed through works of art, and the context in which the diverse objects were used. Certain to be the essential resource on the subject, Buddhist Art of Myanmar illuminates two millennia of rarely seen masterpieces.
Categories: Art