Cinematic Art and Reversals of Power

Cinematic Art and Reversals of Power

Bringing together Deleuze, Blanchot, and Foucault, this book provides a detailed and original exploration of the ideas that influenced Deleuze's thought leading up to and throughout his cinema volumes and, as a result, proposes a new ...

Author: Eugene B. Young

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350176102

Category: Art

Page: 344

View: 741

Bringing together Deleuze, Blanchot, and Foucault, this book provides a detailed and original exploration of the ideas that influenced Deleuze's thought leading up to and throughout his cinema volumes and, as a result, proposes a new definition of art. Examining Blanchot's suggestion that art and dream are “outside” of power, as imagination has neither reality nor truth, and Foucault's theory that power forms knowledge by valuing life, Eugene Brent Young relates these to both Deleuze's philosophy of time and his work with Guattari on art. In doing so, he uses case studies from literature and popular film, including Kafka's Castle, Villeneuve's Arrival, and Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut. Providing important new insights for those working in literary and cinematic studies, this book advances a new definition of art as that which reverses the realities and truths of power to express obscure ideas and values beyond both our exterior and interior worlds.
Categories: Art

Cinematic Art and Reversals of Power

Cinematic Art and Reversals of Power

Subordinate to time in cinematic art (VIII; 5a), whether through internal limits (incessance) or outer limits (coexistence) (VIII; 2c; 3b–c). OBSTINATE UNGRASPABILITY (II–III, V, VIII)—In reversals of power, Blanchot's second feature of ...

Author: Eugene B. Young

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350176119

Category: Art

Page: 344

View: 789

Bringing together Deleuze, Blanchot, and Foucault, this book provides a detailed and original exploration of the ideas that influenced Deleuze's thought leading up to and throughout his cinema volumes and, as a result, proposes a new definition of art. Examining Blanchot's suggestion that art and dream are “outside” of power, as imagination has neither reality nor truth, and Foucault's theory that power forms knowledge by valuing life, Eugene Brent Young relates these to both Deleuze's philosophy of time and his work with Guattari on art. In doing so, he uses case studies from literature and popular film, including Kafka's Castle, Villeneuve's Arrival, and Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut. Providing important new insights for those working in literary and cinematic studies, this book advances a new definition of art as that which reverses the realities and truths of power to express obscure ideas and values beyond both our exterior and interior worlds.
Categories: Art

British Cinema in the 1950 s

British Cinema in the 1950 s

An Art in Peacetime Ian MacKillop, Neil Sinyard ... Losey's films brought the form / content debate to the surface because the visual power and ornateness seemed , to many eyes , out of all proportion to the mundaneness of the subject ...

Author: Ian MacKillop

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719064899

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 656

Covering a variety of genres, such as war films and women's pictures, as well as social issues which affect film-making, this is a re-evaluation of what has until now been seen as the most critically lacklustre period of the British film industry.
Categories: History

Contemporary British Art

Contemporary British Art

In practice, this has resulted in film narratives which explore borders, boundaries, the translation of meaning ... When in power, Ali Bhutto had been a firm supporter of nuclear technology and its deterrent effect, promising to ...

Author: Grant Pooke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415389730

Category: Art

Page: 287

View: 534

The last few decades have been among the most dynamic within recent British cultural history. Artists across all genres and media have developed and re-fashioned their practice against a radically changing social and cultural landscape – both national and global. This book takes a fresh look at some of the themes, ideas and directions which have informed British art since the later 1980s through to the first decade of the new millennium. In addition to discussing some iconic images and examples, it also looks more broadly at the contexts in which a new 'post-conceptual' generation of artists, those typically born since the late 1950s and 1960s have approached and developed aspects of their professional practice. Contemporary British Art is an ideal introduction to the field. To guide the reader, the book is organised around genres or related practices – painting; sculpture and installation; and film, video and performance. The first chapter explores aspects of the contemporary art market and some of the contexts within which art is made, supported and exhibited. The chapters that discuss various genres of art practice also mention books that may be useful to support further reading. Extensively illustrated with a wide range of work (both known, and less well-known) from artists such as Chris Ofili, Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, Banksy, Anthony Gormley, Jack Vettriano, Sam Taylor-Wood, Steve McQueen and Tracey Emin, and many more.
Categories: Art

Cinema and Intermediality

Cinema and Intermediality

About the role of ironic reversals that can be seen in Hitchcock's cinema see also David George Menard's essay (2008). ... classical narrative cinema deals with the power of the imaginary, criticizing it in favour of a sense of realism.

Author: Ágnes Pethő

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443830348

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 525

View: 189

Within the last two decades “intermediality” has emerged as one of the most challenging concepts in media theory with no shortage of various taxonomies and definitions. What prompted the writing of the essays gathered in this volume, however, was not a desire for more classifications applied to the world of moving pictures, but a strong urge to investigate what the “inter-” implied by the idea of “intermediality” stands for, and what it actually entails in the cinema. The book offers in each of the individual chapters a cross-section view of specific instances in which cinema seems to consciously position itself “in-between” media and arts, employing techniques that tap into the multimedial complexity of cinema, and bring into play the tensions generated by media differences. The introductory theoretical writings deal with the historiography of approaching intermedial phenomena in cinema presenting at the same time some of the possible “gateways” that can open up the cinematic image towards the perceptual frames of other media and arts. The book also contains essays that examine more closely specific paradigms in the poetics of cinematic intermediality, like the allure of painting in Hitchcock’s films, the exquisite ways of framing and un-framing haptical imagery in Antonioni’s works, the narrative allegories of media differences, the word and image plays and ekphrastic techniques in Jean-Luc Godard’s “total” cinema, the flâneuristic intermedial gallery of moving images created by José Luis Guerín, or the types of intermedial metalepses in Agnès Varda’s “cinécriture.” From a theoretical vantage point these essays break with the tradition of thinking of intermediality in analogy with intertextuality and attempt a phenomenological (re)definition of intermedial relations. Moreover, some of the analyses target films that expose the coexistence of the hypermediated experience of intermediality and the illusion of reality, connecting the questions of intermediality both to the indexical nature of cinematic representation and to the specific ideological and cultural context of the films, thus offering insights into a few questions regarding the “politics” of intermediality as well.
Categories: Performing Arts

Avant Gardes in Crisis

Avant Gardes in Crisis

Broodthaers's and Godard's two “realities” might be summarized respectively as “the artworld” and the cinema milieu, ... The historical avant-garde of Dada was perhaps the first to seize upon the power of historical reversals when it ...

Author: Jean-Thomas Tremblay

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438485171

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 556

Charts underexamined genealogies of minoritarian aesthetic responses to the multiple crises of the long 1970s. Avant-Gardes in Crisis claims that the avant-gardes of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries are in crisis, in that artmaking both responds to political, economic, and social crises and reveals a crisis of confidence regarding resistance's very possibility. Specifically, this collection casts contemporary avant-gardes as a reaction to a crisis in the reproduction of life that accelerated in the 1970s—a crisis that encompasses living-wage rarity, deadly epidemics, and other aspects of an uneven management of vitality indexed by race, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, class, and disability. The contributors collectively argue that a minoritarian concept of the avant-garde, one attuned to uneven patterns of resource depletion and infrastructural failure (broadly conceived), clarifies the interplay between art and politics as it has played out, for instance, in discussions of art's autonomy or institutionality. Writ large, this book seeks to restore the historical and political context for the debates on the avant-garde that have raged since the 1970s. Jean-Thomas Tremblay is Assistant Professor of English at New Mexico State University. They are currently completing a monograph titled Breathing Aesthetics. Andrew Strombeck is Professor of English at Wright State University. He is the author of DIY on the Lower East Side: Books, Buildings, and Art after the 1975 Fiscal Crisis, also published by SUNY Press.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility and Other Writings on Media

The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility  and Other Writings on Media

This field of action is the space in which a cinematic audience is transformed through " simultaneous collective ... The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility " plays , then , on a series of reversals : the ...

Author: Walter Benjamin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674024451

Category: Art

Page: 426

View: 975

Benjamin’s famous “Work of Art“ essay sets out his boldest thoughts—on media and on culture in general. This book contains the second, and most daring, of the four versions of the “Work of Art“ essay—the one that addresses the utopian developments of the modern media.
Categories: Art

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory

poetic power to tell much more than just a narrative tale: 'At every moment, the entire room is saturated with drama. ... has finally foundan art capable ofdoing itjustice, an art in which the intelligencethat creates the reversals of ...

Author: Edward Branigan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136472626

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 526

View: 153

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory is an international reference work representing the essential ideas and concepts at the centre of film theory from the beginning of the twentieth century, to the beginning of the twenty-first. When first encountering film theory, students are often confronted with a dense, interlocking set of texts full of arcane terminology, inexact formulations, sliding definitions, and abstract generalities. The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory challenges these first impressions by aiming to make film theory accessible and open to new readers. Edward Branigan and Warren Buckland have commissioned over 50 scholars from around the globe to address the difficult formulations and propositions in each theory by reducing these difficult formulations to straightforward propositions. The result is a highly accessible volume that clearly defines, and analyzes step by step, many of the fundamental concepts in film theory, ranging from familiar concepts such as ‘Apparatus’, ‘Gaze’, ‘Genre’, and ‘Identification’, to less well-known and understood, but equally important concepts, such as Alain Badiou’s ‘Inaesthetics’, Gilles Deleuze’s ‘Time-Image’, and Jean-Luc Nancy’s ‘Evidence’. The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory is an ideal reference book for undergraduates of film studies, as well as graduate students new to the discipline.
Categories: Performing Arts

Russia s New Fin de Si cle

Russia   s New Fin de Si  cle

In a sense, Voroshilov Sniper marked ground zero of the gradual privatization of violence in Russian cinema: from Ivan ... Presenting its social provocations within the tradition of street art and carnivalesque reversals of hierarchies, ...

Author: Birgit Beumers

Publisher: Intellect Books

ISBN: 9781783200863

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 200

View: 830

This volume investigates Russian culture at the turn of the twenty-first century, with scholars from Britain, Sweden, Russia and the United States exploring aspects of culture with regards to one overarching question: What is the impact of the Soviet discourse on contemporary culture? This question comes at a time when Russia is concerned with integrating itself into European arts and culture while enhancing its uniqueness through references to its Soviet past. Thus, contributions investigate the phenomenon of post-Soviet culture and try to define the relationship of contemporary art to the past.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Andr Bazin s Film Theory

Andr   Bazin s Film Theory

Art, Science, Religion Angela Dalle Vacche ... Thanks to the destabilizing power of motion, Bazin's anti-anthropocentric film theory implies that photography's transformation into cinema brings about a centrifugal whirlwind that ...

Author: Angela Dalle Vacche

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190067298

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 279

Through metaphors and allusions to art, science, and religion, Andr� Bazin's writings on the cinema explore a simple yet profound question: what is a human? For the famous French film critic, a human is simultaneously a rational animal and an irrational being. Bazin's idea of the cinema is a mind-machine where the ethical implications have priority over aesthetic issues. And in its ability to function as an art form for the masses, cinema is the only medium that can address an audience at the individual and community levels simultaneously-- the audience sees the same film, but each individual relates to the narrative in a different way. In principle, cinema can unsettle our routines in productive ways and expand our sense of belonging to a much larger picture. By arguing that this dissident Catholic's worldview is anti-anthropocentric, Angela Dalle Vacche concludes that Andr� Bazin's idea of the cinema recapitulates the histories of biological evolution and modern technology inside our consciousness. Through the projection of recorded traces of the world onto a brain-like screen, the cinema can open viewers up to self-interrogation and empathy towards Otherness. Bazin was neither a spiritualist nor an animist or a pantheist, yet his film theory leads also to ideas of a more cosmological persuasion: through editing and camera movement, cinema explores our belonging to a vast universe that extends from the microbes of the microscope to the stars of the telescope. Such ideas of connectedness, coupled with Bazin's well-known emphasis of realism, form the foundation for his film theory's embrace of Italian neorealism. Choosing to avoid a quantitative naturalism based on accumulation of details, Bazin's theory instead promotes the kind of cinema that celebrates perceptual displacement, the objectification of human behavior, and one's own critical self-awareness.
Categories: Art