Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

The book tells about the vents and political attitudes during the reconstruction period in Alabama after the civil war.

Author: Walter L. Fleming

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN: EAN:4057664636041

Category: History

Page: 3345

View: 983

The book tells about the vents and political attitudes during the reconstruction period in Alabama after the civil war. It provides a great background for understanding the current political and economic situation of the state from a historical perspective. The author of the book, Walter Lynwood Fleming (1874–1932), a historian of the South and Reconstruction, prepared the Ph.D. thesis on the same topic, and some parts of the book are part of the materials he collected for the work.
Categories: History

Loyalty and Loss

Loyalty and Loss

Margaret M. Storey’s welcome study uncovers and explores those Alabamians who maintained allegiance to the Union when their state seceded in 1861—and beyond.

Author: Margaret M. Storey

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807130222

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 399

Though slavery was widespread and antislavery sentiment rare in Alabama, there emerged a small loyalist population, mostly in the northern counties, that persisted in the face of overwhelming odds against their cause. Margaret M. Storey’s welcome study uncovers and explores those Alabamians who maintained allegiance to the Union when their state seceded in 1861—and beyond. Storey’s extensive, groundbreaking research discloses a socioeconomically diverse group that included slaveholders and nonslaveholders, business people, professionals, farmers, and blacks. By considering the years 1861–1874 as a whole, she clearly connects loyalists’ sometimes brutal wartime treatment with their postwar behavior.
Categories: History

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

This is a comprehensive history beginning around the time of its secession and covering not only the war years but also the Reconstruction Era, which lasted until 1877.

Author: Walter Fleming

Publisher:

ISBN: 1507878443

Category:

Page: 368

View: 967

This is a comprehensive history beginning around the time of its secession and covering not only the war years but also the Reconstruction Era, which lasted until 1877.
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Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama the Original Classic Edition

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama   the Original Classic Edition

This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Walter L. Fleming, which is now, at last, again available to you. Get the PDF and EPUB NOW as well.

Author: Walter L. Fleming

Publisher: Tebbo

ISBN: 1486487300

Category: Fiction

Page: 458

View: 978

Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama. It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Walter L. Fleming, which is now, at last, again available to you. Get the PDF and EPUB NOW as well. Included in your purchase you have Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama in EPUB AND PDF format to read on any tablet, eReader, desktop, laptop or smartphone simultaneous - Get it NOW. Enjoy this classic work today. These selected paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama: Look inside the book: The successes claimed may be summarized as follows: (1) there was no more legislation for the negro similar to that of 1865-66, that following the Reconstruction being "infinitely milder"; (2) Reconstruction gave the negroes a civil status that a century of "restoration" would not have accomplished, for though the right to vote is a nullity, other undisputed rights of the black are due to the Reconstruction; the unchangeable organic laws of the state and of the United States favor negro suffrage, which will come the sooner for being thus theoretically made possible; (3) Reconstruction prevented the southern leaders from returning to Washington as irreconcilables, and gave them troubles enough to keep them busy until a new generation grew up which accepted the results of war; (4) by organizing the blacks it made them independent of white control in politics; (5) it gave the negro an independent church; (6) it gave the negro a right to education and gave to both races the public school system; (7) it made the negro economically free and showed that free labor was better than slave labor; (8) it destroyed the formerPg 802 leaders of the whites and "freed them from the baleful influence of old political leaders"; in general, as Sumner said, the ballot to the negro was "a peacemaker, a schoolmaster, a protector," soon making him a fairly good citizen, and secured peace and order-the "political hell" through which the whites passed being a necessary discipline which secured the greatest good to the greatest number. ...On the other hand, it may be maintained (1) that the intent of the legislation of 1865-1866 has been entirely misunderstood, that it was intended on the whole for the benefit of the negro as well as of the white, and that it has been left permanently off the statute book, not because the whites have been taught better by Reconstruction, but because of the amendments which prohibit in theory what has all along been practised (hence the gross abuses of peonage); (2) that the theoretical rights of the negro have been no inducement to grant him actual privileges, and that these theoretical rights have not proven so permanent as was supposed before the disfranchising movement spread through the South; (3) that the generation after Reconstruction is more irreconcilable than the conservative leaders who were put out of politics in 1865-1867-that the latter were willing to give the negro a chance, while the former, able, radical, and supported by the people, find less and less place for the negro; (4) that if the blacks were united, so were the whites, and in each case the advantage may be questioned; (5) that the value of the negro church is doubtful; (6) that as in politics, so in education, the negro has no opportunities now that were not freely offered him in 1865-1866, and the school system is not a product of Reconstruction, but came near being destroyed by it; (7) that negro free labor is not as efficient as slave labor was, and the negro as a cotton producer has lost his supremacy and his economic position is not at all assured; (8) that the whites have acquired new leaders, but the change has been on the whole from conservatives to radicals, from fri
Categories: Fiction

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Walter L 1874-1932 Fleming

Publisher: Andesite Press

ISBN: 1298529182

Category:

Page: 880

View: 310

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
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The Yellowhammer War

The Yellowhammer War

The soldiers’ nickname, “Yellowhammers,” came from this epithet. After the war, Alabama veterans proudly wore yellowhammer feathers in their hats or lapels when attending reunions.

Author: Kenneth W. Noe

Publisher: University Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817320555

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 672

Published to mark the Civil War sesquicentennial, The Yellowhammer War collects new essays on Alabama’s role in, and experience of, the bloody national conflict and its aftermath. During the first winter of the war, Confederate soldiers derided the men of an Alabama Confederate unit for their yellow-trimmed uniforms that allegedly resembled the plumage of the yellow-shafted flicker or “yellowhammer” (now the Northern Flicker, Colaptes auratus, and the state bird of Alabama). The soldiers’ nickname, “Yellowhammers,” came from this epithet. After the war, Alabama veterans proudly wore yellowhammer feathers in their hats or lapels when attending reunions. Celebrations throughout the state have often expanded on that pageantry and glorified the figures, events, and battles of the Civil War with sometimes dubious attention to historical fact and little awareness of those who supported, resisted, or tolerated the war off the battlefield. Many books about Alabama’s role in the Civil War have focused serious attention on the military and political history of the war. The Yellowhammer War likewise examines the military and political history of Alabama’s Civil War contributions, but it also covers areas of study usually neglected by centennial scholars, such as race, women, the home front, and Reconstruction. From Patricia A. Hoskins’s look at Jews in Alabama during the Civil War and Jennifer Ann Newman Treviño’s examination of white women’s attitudes during secession to Harriet E. Amos Doss’s study of the reaction of Alabamians to Lincoln’s Assassination and Jason J. Battles’s essay on the Freedman’s Bureau, readers are treated to a broader canvas of topics on the Civil War and the state. CONTRIBUTORS Jason J. Battles / Lonnie A. Burnett / Harriet E. Amos Doss / Bertis English / Michael W. Fitzgerald / Jennifer Lynn Gross / Patricia A. Hoskins / Kenneth W. Noe / Victoria E. Ott / Terry L. Seip / Ben H. Severance / Kristopher A. Teters / Jennifer Ann Newman Treviño / Sarah Woolfolk Wiggins / Brian Steel Wills Published in Cooperation with the Frances S. Summersell Center for the Study of the South
Categories: History

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama Primary Source Edition

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama   Primary Source Edition

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.

Author: Walter Lynwood Fleming

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN: 1293775746

Category:

Page: 874

View: 975

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification: ++++ Civil War And Reconstruction In Alabama Walter Lynwood Fleming Columbia University Press, 1905 History; United States; State & Local; South; Alabama; History / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877); History / United States / State & Local / South; Reconstruction; Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)
Categories:

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

Civil War and Reconstruction in Alabama

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Author: Walter Lynwood Fleming

Publisher: Arkose Press

ISBN: 1343799449

Category:

Page: 876

View: 247

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Categories:

Reconstruction in Alabama

Reconstruction in Alabama

Reconstruction in Alabama examines the Civil War and Reconstruction era in Alabama, the first full-scale reexamination in over a century.

Author: Michael W. Fitzgerald

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807166079

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 593

The civil rights revolutions of the 1950s and 1960s transformed the literature on Reconstruction in America by emphasizing the social history of emancipation and the hopefulness that reunification would bring equality. Much of this revisionist work served to counter and correct the racist and pro-Confederate accounts of Reconstruction written in the early twentieth century. While there have been modern scholarly revisions of individual states, most are decades old, and Michael W. Fitzgerald’s Reconstruction in Alabama is the first comprehensive reinterpretation of that state’s history in over a century. Fitzgerald’s work not only revises the existing troubling histories of the era, it also offers a compelling and innovative new look at the process of rebuilding Alabama following the war. Attending to an array of issues largely ignored until now, Fitzgerald’s history begins by analyzing the differences over slavery, secession, and war that divided Alabama’s whites, mostly along the lines of region and class. He examines the economic and political implications of defeat, focusing particularly on how freed slaves and their former masters mediated the postwar landscape. For a time, he suggests, whites and freedpeople coexisted mostly peaceably in some parts of the state under the Reconstruction government, as a recovering cotton economy bathed the plantation belt in profit. Later, when charting the rise and fall of the Republican Party, Fitzgerald shows that Alabama's new Republican government implemented an ambitious program of railroad subsidy, characterized by substantial corruption that eventually bankrupted the state and helped end Republican rule. He shows, however, that the state’s freedpeople and their preferred leaders were not the major players in this arena: they had other issues that mattered to them far more, like public education, civil rights, voting rights, and resisting the Klan’s terrorist violence. After Reconstruction ended, Fitzgerald suggests that white collective memory of the era fixated on black voting, big government, high taxes, and corruption, all of which buttressed the Jim Crow order in the state. This misguided understanding of the past encouraged Alabama's intransigence during the later civil rights era. Despite the power of faulty interpretations that united segregationists, Fitzgerald demonstrates that it was class and regional divisions over economic policy, as much as racial tension, that shaped the complex reality of Reconstruction in Alabama.
Categories: History