Conversations with Saul Bellow

Conversations with Saul Bellow

Renowned writer Saul Bellow reflects on the times in which we live and the craft of writing.

Author: Saul Bellow

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 0878057188

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 903

Renowned writer Saul Bellow reflects on the times in which we live and the craft of writing. Bellow asks what meaningful words are left to write in the face of such events as revolutions, world wars, the atom bomb, and who would take the time to read them if new words were found or invented. Fortunately Faulkner is no longer alive, and unfortunately, neither is Hemingway.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow

"A Talk With Saul Bellow" New York Times Book Review, 20 Sep. 1953: 22. Rpt. Conversations with Saul Bellow. Ed. Gloria L. Cronin and Ben Siegel. Jackson: University Press Mississippi, 1994: 5. Print. 2. Steers, Nina.

Author: Mark Connelly

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786499267

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 894

A three-time National Book Award for Fiction winner, Saul Bellow (1915-2005) is one of the most highly regarded American authors to emerge since World War II. His 60-year career produced 14 novels and novellas, two volumes of nonfiction, short story collections, plays and a book of collected letters. His 1953 breakthrough novel The Adventures of Augie March was followed by Seize the Day (1956), Herzog (1964) and Mr. Sammler's Planet (1970). His Humboldt's Gift won a Pulitzer Prize in 1976 and contributed to his receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature that year. This literary companion provides more than 200 entries about his works, literary characters, events and persons in his life. Also included are an introduction and overview of Bellow's life, statements made by him during interviews, suggestions for writing and further study and an extensive bibliography.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Conversations with Robert Penn Warren

Conversations with Robert Penn Warren

Featuring interviews conducted by such writers and journalists as William Kennedy, Bill Moyers, C. Vann Woodward, and Roy Newquist, this collection's depth and focus are remarkable.

Author: Gloria L. Cronin

Publisher:

ISBN: 1578067332

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 231

View: 484

Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989) excelled in three written genres-fiction, poetry, and literary criticism-and is one of the few writers to be awarded Pulitzer Prizes for both his poetry and his fiction. With Cleanth Brooks, he inspired practitioners of New Criticism and revolutionized the way literature was taught and studied in the academy. His 1946 novel All the King's Men, a fictionalized account of Louisianan Huey P. Long's gubernatorial administration, remains the template for American political commentary in fiction. In 1985, Warren became the first U.S. Poet Laureate. Conversations with Robert Penn Warren collects interviews ranging from the 1950s to the 1980s. Featuring interviews conducted by such writers and journalists as William Kennedy, Bill Moyers, C. Vann Woodward, and Roy Newquist, this collection's depth and focus are remarkable. Warren's critical acumen is present in every piece here, as he talks forthrightly about literature's place in American culture, the role of history in his novels and poetry, and the contemporary events that raged during his lifetime. Conversations with Robert Penn Warren is a rewarding look at a man whose life and literary career spanned most of the twentieth century. Gloria L. Cronin, Provo, Utah, professor of English at Brigham Young University, is the author of A Room of His Own: In Search of the Feminine in the Novels of Saul Bellow, Small Planets: Saul Bellow and the Art of Short Fiction, and other books. Ben Siegel, Claremont, California, is professor of English at California State Polytechnic University in Pomona. Among other works, he is the author of The Puritan Heritage: America's Roots in the Bible, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and the editor of The American Writer in the University.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

A Political Companion to Saul Bellow

A Political Companion to Saul Bellow

Bruce Cook, “Saul Bellow: A Mood of Protest,” Perspectives on Ideas and the Arts (February 12, 1963), reprinted in Conversations with Saul Bellow, ed. Gloria L. Cronin and Ben Siegel (Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 1994), ...

Author: Gloria L. Cronin

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813141862

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 643

Saul Bellow is one of the twentieth century's most influential, respected, and honored writers. His novels The Adventures of Augie March, Herzog, and Mr. Sammler's Planet won the National Book Award, and Humboldt's Gift was awarded the 1976 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. In addition, his plays garnered popular and critical acclaim, and some were produced on Broadway. Known for his insights into life in a post-Holocaust world, Bellow's explorations of modernity, Jewish identity, and the relationship between art and society have resonated with his readers, but because his writing is not overtly political, his politics have largely been ignored. A Political Companion to Saul Bellow examines the author's novels, essays, short stories, and letters in order to illuminate his evolution from liberal to neoconservative. It investigates Bellow's exploration of the United States as a democratic system, the religious and ideological influences on his work, and his views on race relations, religious identity, and multiculturalism in the academy. Featuring a fascinating conclusion that draws from interviews with Bellow's sons, this accessible companion is an excellent resource for understanding the political thought of one of America's most acclaimed writers.
Categories: Political Science

The Cambridge Companion to Saul Bellow

The Cambridge Companion to Saul Bellow

192. Gordon Lloyd Harper, “The Art of Fiction: Saul Bellow,” Conversations, p. 63. David Remnick, “Mr. Bellow's Planet,” Conversations, p. 294. I am pleased to acknowledge discussions on this essay with Greg Bellow, although he bears no ...

Author: Victoria Aarons

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107108936

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 456

This book demonstrates the complexity of Bellow's work by emphasizing the ways in which it reflects the changing conditions of American identity.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Woman in the Novels of Saul Bellow

The Woman in the Novels of Saul Bellow

Enck , John , “ Saul Bellow : An Interview . ” Wisconsin Studies in Contemporary Literature , 6 ( 1965 ) , 156-60 . Kakutani , Michiko , “ A Talk With Saul Bellow : On His Work and Himself . ” The New York Times Book Review ...

Author: Ram Prakash Pradhan

Publisher: Atlantic Publishers & Dist

ISBN: 8126906545

Category: American fiction

Page: 144

View: 716

The Book Presents In Brief A Critical Study Of Saul Bellow S Vision Of Woman In General. As The Novelist Has Presented A Variety Of Women Having Contradictory Traits, Any Attempt At Flat Generalisation Has Been Considered Forbidding. In Spite Of His Jewish Lineage And Specific Jewish Themes, Saul Bellow Has Established Himself As A Humanistic And Conscientious American Novelist. Hence, Such Conception, As Popular In Jewish Tradition, That His Woman Characters Must Occupy A Subordinate Place And Their Freedom Of Mind Shall Be Restricted, Seems To Be Futile. Far From Being Misogynous As It Is Sometimes Alleged By A Few Critics, His Vision Of Woman Appears To Be Balanced, Objective And Free From Personal Prejudice.The Book Is A Valuable Study On Nobel Laureate Saul Bellow, And All Those Who Admire His Works Would Find It Interesting And Useful As It Will Enable Them To See His Characters From A Different Perspective. Students And Also The Teachers Of English Literature Will Find It Highly Informative.
Categories: American fiction

Conversations with Saul Bellow on Esoteric Spiritual Matters

Conversations with Saul Bellow on Esoteric Spiritual Matters

This book offers a personal account of the conversations and correspondence that followed their meeting through a mutual acquaintance, and includes the foreword Saul Bellow wrote then for the book of lectures by Rudolf Steiner, The ...

Author: Stephen E. Usher

Publisher:

ISBN: 1621482073

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 71

View: 197

In 1975, Saul Bellow published his eighth novel, Humboldt's Gift, in which the main protagonist is occupied with, among other things, the teachings of Rudolf Steiner. Although the novel was an immediate success and won a Pulitzer Prize, leading to Bellow's Nobel Prize for Literature in 1976, the unapologetic presence of Rudolf Steiner's Anthroposophy in a work of such obvious cultural importance was, and remains, puzzling for many commentators. A sentence from one contemporary review of the novel is typical: "I am not clear whether Charlie's devotion to Steiner's Anthroposophy is one of Mr. Bellow's more obscure jokes or is meant seriously." Those readers with more than a passing knowledge of Steiner's work, however, immediately recognized that an authentic effort to come to terms with anthroposophy in an unbiased way was behind Bellow's artful depiction of Charlie Citrine. Stephen Usher, who later became the manager of the Anthroposophic Press (now SteinerBooks), was one such reader. This book offers a personal account of the conversations and correspondence that followed their meeting through a mutual acquaintance, and includes the foreword Saul Bellow wrote then for the book of lectures by Rudolf Steiner, The Boundaries of Natural Science.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Life of Saul Bellow

The Life of Saul Bellow

Quoted in Pete Hamill, “A Look at Saul Bellow, Writer at the Top," New York Herald Tribune, 27 September 1964. ... Robert Gutwillig, “Talk with Saul Bellow,” New York Times Book Review, 20 September 1964, reprinted in Conversations with ...

Author: Zachary Leader

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9781101875179

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 484

When this second volume of The Life of Saul Bellow opens, Bellow, at forty-nine, is at the pinnacle of American letters - rich, famous, critically acclaimed. The expected trajectory is one of decline: volume 1, rise; volume 2, fall. Bellow never fell, producing some of his greatest fiction (Mr Sammler's Planet, Humboldt's Gift, all his best stories), winning two more National Book Awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and the Nobel Prize. At eighty, he wrote his last story; at eighty-five, he wrote Ravelstein. In this volume, his life away from the desk, including his love life, is if anything more dramatic than in volume 1. In the public sphere, he is embroiled in controversy over foreign affairs, race, religion, education, social policy, the state of culture, the fate of the novel. Bellow's relations with women were often fraught. In the 1960s he was compulsively promiscuous (even as he inveighed against sexual liberation). The women he pursued, the ones he married and those with whom he had affairs, were intelligent, attractive and strong-willed. At eighty-five he fathered his fourth child, a daughter, with his fifth wife. His three sons, whom he loved, could be as volatile as he was, and their relations with their father were often troubled. Although an early and engaged supporter of civil rights, in the second half of his life Bellow was angered by the excesses of Black Power. An opponent of cultural relativism, he exercised great influence in literary and intellectual circles, advising a host of institutes and foundations, helping those he approved of, hindering those of whom he disapproved. In making his case, he could be cutting and rude; he could also be charming, loyal, and funny. Bellow's heroic energy and will are clear to the very end of his life. His immense achievement and its cost, to himself and others, are also clear.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography