Democracy s High School

Democracy s High School

Two earlier reports from the U.S. Office of Education were followed up in 1958 with a third bulletin , called Block - Time Classes and the Core Program in the Junior High School , prepared again by Grace S. Wright ( 1958 ) .

Author: William G. Wraga

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0819191620

Category: Education

Page: 290

View: 978

Traces the development of the comprehensive high school model in the US, evaluating the influence of sociopolitical forces on - and historical interpretations of - the model. He assesses the impact of successive reform movements and offers recommendations for enhancing its effectiveness.
Categories: Education

Democratic Public Discourse and Small Group Discussion in a High School Social Studies Classroom

Democratic Public Discourse and Small Group Discussion in a High School Social Studies Classroom

Wertsch, J. V. (1991). Voices ind: A sociocultural approach to mediated action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Westbrook, R. B. (1996). In R. Soder (Ed.), Democracy, education, and the schools (pp. 125-150).

Author: Lynn Marie Brice

Publisher:

ISBN: MSU:31293017127329

Category: Communication in small groups

Page: 580

View: 985

Categories: Communication in small groups

Living Democracy in Secondary Schools

Living Democracy in Secondary Schools

All this means democracy in action for the common good . Other extracurricular activities . ... The club program of a high school is profitably considered a matter of management for the student council . Students desiring to form a ...

Author: Anne Laura McGregor

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951D035434320

Category: Democracy

Page: 32

View: 236

Categories: Democracy

Democratic Education for Social Studies

Democratic Education for Social Studies

DEMOCRATIC. SHOULD. A. HIGH. SCHOOL. BE? Please check the statements which you agree should be a high school practice. Please cross off those statements that you judge should not be a high school practice. The purpose of these questions ...

Author: Anna S. Ochoa-Becker

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 9781607525837

Category: Education

Page: 365

View: 367

In the first edition of this book published in 1988, Shirley Engle and I offered a broader and more democratic curriculum as an alternative to the persistent back-to-the-basics rhetoric of the ‘70s and ‘80s. This curriculum urged attention to democratic practices and curricula in the school if we wanted to improve the quality of citizen participation and strengthen this democracy. School practices during that period reflected a much lower priority for social studies. Fewer social studies offerings, fewer credits required for graduation and in many cases, the job descriptions of social studies curriculum coordinators were transformed by changing their roles to general curriculum consultants. The mentality that prevailed in the nation’s schools was “back to the basics” and the basics never included or even considered the importance of heightening the education of citizens. We certainly agree that citizens must be able to read, write and calculate but these abilities are not sufficient for effective citizenship in a democracy. This version of the original work appears at a time when young citizens, teachers and schools find themselves deluged by a proliferation of curriculum standards and concomitant mandatory testing. In the ‘90s, virtually all subject areas including United States history, geography, economic and civics developed curriculum standards, many funded by the federal government. Subsequently, the National Council for the Social Studies issued the Social Studies Curriculum Standards that received no federal support. Accountability, captured in the No Child Left Behind Act passed by Congress, has become a powerful, political imperative that has a substantial and disturbing influence on the curriculum, teaching and learning in the first decade of the 21st century.
Categories: Education

Does Everyone Want Democracy

Does Everyone Want Democracy

̄ A small group of people believes that political freedoms will also lead to the institutionalization of democracy in Mongolia (17, or 2.0 percent in 1998; 9, or 2.2 percent in 2003). Most are urban dwellers with a high school or ...

Author: Paula L. W. Sabloff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315430195

Category: Social Science

Page: 281

View: 947

Do all people desire democracy? For at least a century, the idea that democracy is a universal good has been an article of faith for American policy makers. Paula Sabloff challenges this conventional wisdom about who wants democracy and why. Arguing that certain universal human aspirations exist, she shows how local realities are highly particularistic and explains that culture, history, and values are critical to the study of political systems. Her fascinating study of Mongolia—feudal until it became the first country to follow Russia into communism and now struggling with post-socialist democratization—is a model for investigating how everyday people around the world actually think about and implement democracy on their own terms.
Categories: Social Science

Democracy s Schools

Democracy s Schools

zens, the new high school was a gift to the wealthy; the high school's supporters tended to be wealthier and better ... small-town children were much more likely to enroll.71 One of the ironies of the expansion of American democracy, ...

Author: Johann N. Neem

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421423210

Category: Education

Page: 257

View: 106

The unknown history of American public education. At a time when Americans are debating the future of public education, Johann N. Neem tells the inspiring story of how and why Americans built a robust public school system in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. It’s a story in which ordinary people in towns across the country worked together to form districts and build schoolhouses and reformers sought to expand tax support and give every child a liberal education. By the time of the Civil War, most northern states had made common schools free, and many southern states were heading in the same direction. Americans made schooling a public good. Yet back then, like today, Americans disagreed over the kind of education needed, who should pay for it, and how schools should be governed. Neem explores the history and meaning of these disagreements. As Americans debated, teachers and students went about the daily work of teaching and learning. Neem takes us into the classrooms of yore so that we may experience public schools from the perspective of the people whose daily lives were most affected by them. Ultimately, Neem concludes, public schools encouraged a diverse people to see themselves as one nation. By studying the origins of America’s public schools, Neem urges us to focus on the defining features of democratic education: promoting equality, nurturing human beings, preparing citizens, and fostering civic solidarity.
Categories: Education

We the Students and Teachers

We  the Students and Teachers

A second high school candidate believed that “democratic teaching allows students the choice to participate in the construction of the classroom” and a middle school candidate proposed “democratic teaching would include students having ...

Author: Robert W. Maloy

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438455587

Category: Education

Page: 258

View: 215

Provides practical applications of democratic teaching for classes in history/social studies education, multicultural and social justice education, community service and civic engagement, and education and public policy. We, the Students and Teachers shows history and social studies educators how to make school classrooms into democratic spaces for teaching and learning. The book offers practical strategies and lesson ideas for transforming democratic theory into instructional practice. It stresses the importance of students and teachers working together to create community and change. The book serves as an essential text for history and social studies teaching methods courses as well as professional development and inservice programs for history and social studies teachers at all grade levels. “The key to the excellent potential of this book is its assertion that democratic teaching can be linked to content, especially historical content, not just to a generic notion of ‘student-centered instruction.’ The theory-to-practice emphasis is very explicit, as is the emphasis on the voices of the teachers and students who participated in the research. The book also takes a highly creative approach to its topic that I find very refreshing.” — Elizabeth Washington, University of Florida “This is an important book. Maloy and LaRoche reveal the challenges that face historians as we grapple with increasingly fraught public and political perceptions of our discipline. Their strategies for reconstituting the classroom as a laboratory for instilling democratic values and practices are both ingenious and practical.” — Dane Morrison, author of True Yankees: Sea Captains, the South Seas, and the Discovery of American Identity
Categories: Education

Education for Public Democracy

Education for Public Democracy

To this end , when I sought to examine the organization and practices of the two alternative high schools described in this book , it was necessary first to present a set of ideas that challenged dominant , privatized notions and ...

Author: David T. Sehr

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791431673

Category: Education

Page: 216

View: 705

Examines the kinds of school structures and educational practices that nurture the development of young people as public, democratic citizens. Education for Public Democracy identifies two competing traditions of American democracy and citizenship: a dominant, privately-oriented citizenship tradition and an alternative tradition of public democratic citizenship. Based on the second tradition, public democracy, the author outlines a set of qualities an effective democratic citizen must possess, as well as a number of ideal school practices that promote these qualities in young people. This discussion provides a framework for analyzing two democratic urban alternative high schools. The book provides an essential bridge between democratic theory and promising school practices that promote public democratic citizenship. Its insights will be indispensable to teachers, school administrators, teacher educators, and theorists who seek to recreate American education in the service of a revitalized democracy.
Categories: Education

School Reform and Democracy in East Asia

School Reform and Democracy in East Asia

Heung-deok High School started as a high school innovation school surrounded by such concerns. In struggling with the issue of Korean school education, Lee has been trying to find a new school model, but he expects that the innovative ...

Author: Masamichi Ueno

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429794384

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 801

This book discusses how East Asia has introduced school and curricular reform to reflect democratic citizenship and globalized skills, knowledge, dispositions, and competencies in the 21st century. It also focuses on the tendencies and reasons students from Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore receive the highest scores in international students’ assessment such as PISA and TIMSS; yet their curiosity and motivation for learning are the lowest internationally. Moreover, Indonesian and Vietnamese students are likely to receive the lowest testing scores, yet their motivation for learning is quite high. It is worth investigating high academic achievement in East Asia in light of the trend towards democratization. The authors consider controversial issues such as whether the goals of democratic education should be the attainment of high academic scores, consideration of whether to implement competency-based curriculums or meritocratic systems of academic competition, and the provision of equal opportunities in the community of learning. The book illuminates each country’s struggle to realise school reform on the basis of its social and cultural settings, and looks at what connects East Asia’s past, present, and future.
Categories: Education

Consolidating Democracy in South Korea

Consolidating Democracy in South Korea

Doh Chull Shin , " The Democratization of Korean Politics and Culture in Progress and Repose : Public Opinion Survey ... 23.6 percent of those with a middle school diploma , and 30.4 percent for those with a high school diploma .

Author: Larry Jay Diamond

Publisher: Lynne Rienner Publishers

ISBN: 1555878482

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 854

A review of the dilemmas, tensions and contradictions arising from democratic consolidation in South Korea. It explores the turbulent features of Korean democracy in its first decade, assesses the progress that has been made, and identifies the key obstacles to effective democratic governance.
Categories: Political Science