Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo

Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo

Rossell asserts that " in Buffalo mandatory reassignments followed five years of successful voluntary desegregation , and the mandatory reassignments were identified with a highly popular preschool program that has always had a surplus ...

Author: Steven J. L. Taylor

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791439194

Category: Political Science

Page: 259

View: 132

Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo examines how the citizens and the political leadership of the two cities dealt with controversial court orders to end the segregation of public schools. Although the cities shared many similarities, they witnessed very dissimilar outcomes. Taylor covers key factors such as inter-ethnic relations and the struggle of various ethnic groups for political empowerment, and focuses on the political development of African American communities in urban environments and the role of Black elected leadership in helping to diffuse potentially volatile situations.
Categories: Political Science

Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo

Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo

Examines how citizens and the political leadership of two cities dealt with controversial court orders to end the segregation of public schools.

Author: Steven J. L. Taylor

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791439208

Category: Social Science

Page: 259

View: 666

Examines how citizens and the political leadership of two cities dealt with controversial court orders to end the segregation of public schools.
Categories: Social Science

Boston Against Busing

Boston Against Busing

164 regarding Buffalo's school population; Gregory S. Jacobs, Getting Around Brown: Desegregation, Development, and the Columbus Public Schools (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1998), pp. 185, 192, 193,197; William Henry Kellar, ...

Author: Ronald P. Formisano

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807869703

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 216

Perhaps the most spectacular reaction to court-ordered busing in the 1970s occurred in Boston, where there was intense and protracted protest. Ron Formisano explores the sources of white opposition to school desegregation. Racism was a key factor, Formisano argues, but racial prejudice alone cannot explain the movement. Class resentment, ethnic rivalries, and the defense of neighborhood turf all played powerful roles in the protest. In a new epilogue, Formisano brings the story up to the present day, describing the end of desegregation orders in Boston and other cities. He also examines the nationwide trend toward the resegregation of schools, which he explains is the result of Supreme Court decisions, attacks on affirmative action, white flight, and other factors. He closes with a brief look at the few school districts that have attempted to base school assignment policies on class or economic status.
Categories: Political Science

The Myth of Southern Exceptionalism

The Myth of Southern Exceptionalism

13. Steven J. L. Taylor, Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo: The Influence of Local Leaders (Albany: SUNY Press, 1998), 49. 14. Batson, Chronology, 58. 15. Ruth Batson, “Presentation on Mental Health and Desegregation,” School ...

Author: Matthew D. Lassiter

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195384741

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 256

"More than one-third of the population of the United States now lives in the South, a region where politics, race relations, and the economy have changed dramatically since World War II. Yet scholars and journalists continue to disagree over whether the modern South is dominating, deviating from, or converging with the rest of the nation. This collection asks how the stories of American history chance if the South is no longer seen as a region apart--as the conservative exception to a liberal nation."--Back cover.
Categories: History

Visiones contempor neas de la cultura y la literatura norteamericana en los sesenta

Visiones contempor  neas de la cultura y la literatura norteamericana en los sesenta

Opposing the court's orders , much of the city's leadership worked against desegregation . ... Steven Taylor's The Segregation of Boston and Buffalo demonstrates how advanced planning and a less adversarial leadership made Buffalo's ...

Author: Pilar Marín Madrazo

Publisher: Universidad de Sevilla

ISBN: 8447207293

Category: Fiction

Page: 247

View: 830

Categories: Fiction

A More Beautiful and Terrible History

A More Beautiful and Terrible History

Robert Taylor, Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo: The Influence of Local Leaders (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998), 85. 20. Robert Levey, “Busing—A Non-Word with Racial Emphasis, Boston Globe, June 6, 1965. 21.

Author: Jeanne Theoharis

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807075883

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 606

Praised by The New York Times; O, The Oprah Magazine; Bitch Magazine; Slate; Publishers Weekly; and more, this is “a bracing corrective to a national mythology” (New York Times) around the civil rights movement. The civil rights movement has become national legend, lauded by presidents from Reagan to Obama to Trump, as proof of the power of American democracy. This fable, featuring dreamy heroes and accidental heroines, has shuttered the movement firmly in the past, whitewashed the forces that stood in its way, and diminished its scope. And it is used perniciously in our own times to chastise present-day movements and obscure contemporary injustice. In A More Beautiful and Terrible History award-winning historian Jeanne Theoharis dissects this national myth-making, teasing apart the accepted stories to show them in a strikingly different light. We see Rosa Parks not simply as a bus lady but a lifelong criminal justice activist and radical; Martin Luther King, Jr. as not only challenging Southern sheriffs but Northern liberals, too; and Coretta Scott King not only as a “helpmate” but a lifelong economic justice and peace activist who pushed her husband’s activism in these directions. Moving from “the histories we get” to “the histories we need,” Theoharis challenges nine key aspects of the fable to reveal the diversity of people, especially women and young people, who led the movement; the work and disruption it took; the role of the media and “polite racism” in maintaining injustice; and the immense barriers and repression activists faced. Theoharis makes us reckon with the fact that far from being acceptable, passive or unified, the civil rights movement was unpopular, disruptive, and courageously persevering. Activists embraced an expansive vision of justice—which a majority of Americans opposed and which the federal government feared. By showing us the complex reality of the movement, the power of its organizing, and the beauty and scope of the vision, Theoharis proves that there was nothing natural or inevitable about the progress that occurred. A More Beautiful and Terrible History will change our historical frame, revealing the richness of our civil rights legacy, the uncomfortable mirror it holds to the nation, and the crucial work that remains to be done. Winner of the 2018 Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize in Nonfiction
Categories: Political Science

Declaring Disaster

Declaring Disaster

... Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo; Bahr, The Blizzard, 26. 7. By 1976 Buffalo was besieged by malls. The Boulevard Mall opened outside of North Buffalo in 1962; the Seneca Mall opened outside of South Buffalo in 1969; ...

Author: Timothy W. Kneeland

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815655114

Category: Nature

Page: 221

View: 938

On Friday, January 28, 1977, it began to snow in Buffalo. The second largest city in New York State, located directly in line with the Great Lakes’ snowbelt, was no stranger to this kind of winter weather. With their city averaging ninety-four inches of snow per year, the citizens of Buffalo knew how to survive a snowstorm. But the blizzard that engulfed the city for the next four days was about to make history. Between the subzero wind chill and whiteout conditions, hundreds of people were trapped when the snow began to fall. Twenty- to thirty-foot-high snow drifts isolated residents in their offices and homes, and even in their cars on the highway. With a dependency on rubber-tire vehicles, which lost all traction in the heavily blanketed urban streets, they were cut off from food, fuel, and even electricity. This one unexpected snow disaster stranded tens of thousands of people, froze public utilities and transportation, and cost Buffalo hundreds of millions of dollars in economic losses and property damages. The destruction wrought by this snowstorm, like the destruction brought on by other natural disasters, was from a combination of weather-related hazards and the public policies meant to mitigate them. Buffalo’s 1977 blizzard, the first snowstorm to be declared a disaster in US history, came after a century of automobility, suburbanization, and snow removal guidelines like the bare-pavement policy. Kneeland offers a compelling examination of whether the 1977 storm was an anomaly or the inevitable outcome of years of city planning. From the local to the state and federal levels, Kneeland discusses governmental response and disaster relief, showing how this regional event had national implications for environmental policy and how its effects have resounded through the complexities of disaster politics long after the snow fell.
Categories: Nature

Crossing Segregated Boundaries

Crossing Segregated Boundaries

Bradley and the Controversy over Desegregation (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2011); Steven J. L. Taylor, Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo: The Influence of Local Leaders (Albany: State University of ...

Author: Dionne Danns

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781978810075

Category: Education

Page: 246

View: 962

Scholars have long explored school desegregation through various lenses, examining policy, the role of the courts and federal government, resistance and backlash, and the fight to preserve Black schools. However, few studies have examined the group experiences of students within desegregated schools. Crossing Segregated Boundaries centers the experiences of over sixty graduates of the class of 1988 in three desegregated Chicago high schools. Chicago’s housing segregation and declining white enrollments severely curtailed the city’s school desegregation plan, and as a result desegregation options were academically stratified, providing limited opportunities for a chosen few while leaving the majority of students in segregated, underperforming schools. Nevertheless, desegregation did provide a transformative opportunity for those students involved. While desegregation was the external impetus that brought students together, the students themselves made integration possible, and many students found that the few years that they spent in these schools had a profound impact on broadening their understanding of different racial and ethnic groups. In very real ways, desegregated schools reduced racial isolation for those who took part.
Categories: Education

Groundwork

Groundwork

... and desegregation-related conflicts led the public to have an overinflated sense of the costs and problems with desegregation, and thus the public was more likely to oppose it (Taylor, Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo, 85). 101.

Author: Jeanne Theoharis

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814782842

Category: Political Science

Page: 328

View: 466

A groundbreaking collection of essays on the civil rights movement focusing on smaller, regional civil organizations across the country - not just in the South.
Categories: Political Science

Encyclopedia of African American Education

Encyclopedia of African American Education

It was an important strategy to help parents become invested in the desegregation of the Buffalo Public School System. The update of the school system contained in ... Desegregation in Boston and Buffalo: The influence of local leaders.

Author: Kofi Lomotey

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781412940504

Category: Education

Page: 1111

View: 902

The Encyclopedia of African American Education covers educational institutions at every level, from preschool through graduate and professional training, with special attention to historically black and predominantly black colleges and universities. Other entries cover individuals, organizations, associations, and publications that have had a significant impact on African American education. The Encyclopedia also presents information on public policy affecting the education of African Americans, including both court decisions and legislation. It includes a discussion of curriculum, concepts, theories, and alternative models of education, and addresses the topics of gender and sexual orientation, religion, and the media. The Encyclopedia also includes a Reader's Guide, provided to help readers find entries on related topics. It classifies entries in sixteen categories: " Alternative Educational Models " Associations and Organizations " Biographies " Collegiate Education " Curriculum " Economics " Gender " Graduate and Professional Education " Historically Black Colleges and Universities " Legal Cases " Pre-Collegiate Education " Psychology and Human Development " Public Policy " Publications " Religious Institutions " Segregation/Desegregation. Some entries appear in more than one category. This two-volume reference work will be an invaluable resource not only for educators and students but for all readers who seek an understanding of African American education both historically and in the 21st century.
Categories: Education