DIY Citizenship

DIY Citizenship

DIY citizenship require a more robust account of power relations to avoid familiar and empty invocations surrounding “democracy” rhetoric that too easily slide into liberal assumptions of individualized agency. Hartley's DIY Citizenship ...

Author: Matt Ratto

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262321228

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 464

View: 991

How social media and DIY communities have enabled new forms of political participation that emphasize doing and making rather than passive consumption. Today, DIY—do-it-yourself—describes more than self-taught carpentry. Social media enables DIY citizens to organize and protest in new ways (as in Egypt's “Twitter revolution” of 2011) and to repurpose corporate content (or create new user-generated content) in order to offer political counternarratives. This book examines the usefulness and limits of DIY citizenship, exploring the diverse forms of political participation and “critical making” that have emerged in recent years. The authors and artists in this collection describe DIY citizens whose activities range from activist fan blogging and video production to knitting and the creation of community gardens. Contributors examine DIY activism, describing new modes of civic engagement that include Harry Potter fan activism and the activities of the Yes Men. They consider DIY making in learning, culture, hacking, and the arts, including do-it-yourself media production and collaborative documentary making. They discuss DIY and design and how citizens can unlock the black box of technological infrastructures to engage and innovate open and participatory critical making. And they explore DIY and media, describing activists' efforts to remake and reimagine media and the public sphere. As these chapters make clear, DIY is characterized by its emphasis on “doing” and making rather than passive consumption. DIY citizens assume active roles as interventionists, makers, hackers, modders, and tinkerers, in pursuit of new forms of engaged and participatory democracy. Contributors Mike Ananny, Chris Atton, Alexandra Bal, Megan Boler, Catherine Burwell, Red Chidgey, Andrew Clement, Negin Dahya, Suzanne de Castell, Carl DiSalvo, Kevin Driscoll, Christina Dunbar-Hester, Joseph Ferenbok, Stephanie Fisher, Miki Foster, Stephen Gilbert, Henry Jenkins, Jennifer Jenson, Yasmin B. Kafai, Ann Light, Steve Mann, Joel McKim, Brenda McPhail, Owen McSwiney, Joshua McVeigh-Schultz, Graham Meikle, Emily Rose Michaud, Kate Milberry, Michael Murphy, Jason Nolan, Kate Orton-Johnson, Kylie A. Peppler, David J. Phillips, Karen Pollock, Matt Ratto, Ian Reilly, Rosa Reitsamer, Mandy Rose, Daniela K. Rosner, Yukari Seko, Karen Louise Smith, Lana Swartz, Alex Tichine, Jennette Weber, Elke Zobl
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Digital Disability

Digital Disability

“ citizenship " is no longer simply a matter of a social contract between a state and subject , no longer even a ... Let us consider the DIY citizen in the light of the representation of disability on television , as , for example ...

Author: Gerard Goggin

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0742518442

Category: Social Science

Page: 183

View: 313

Media representation of and for the disabled has been recharged in recent years with the expansion of new media worldwide. Interactive digital communications -- such as the Interact, new varieties of voice and text telephones, and digital broadcasting -- have created a need for a more innovative understanding of new media and disability issues. This engaging analysis offers a global perspective on how people with disabilities are represented as users, consumers, viewers, or listeners of new media, by policymakers, corporations, programmers, and the disabled themselves.
Categories: Social Science

DIY Citizenship

DIY Citizenship

This book examines the usefulness and limits of DIY citizenship, exploring the diverse forms of political participation and “critical making” that have emerged in recent years.

Author: Matt Ratto

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262026819

Category: Computers

Page: 450

View: 919

How social media and DIY communities have enabled new forms of political participation that emphasize doing and making rather than passive consumption. Today, DIY—do-it-yourself—describes more than self-taught carpentry. Social media enables DIY citizens to organize and protest in new ways (as in Egypt's “Twitter revolution” of 2011) and to repurpose corporate content (or create new user-generated content) in order to offer political counternarratives. This book examines the usefulness and limits of DIY citizenship, exploring the diverse forms of political participation and “critical making” that have emerged in recent years. The authors and artists in this collection describe DIY citizens whose activities range from activist fan blogging and video production to knitting and the creation of community gardens. Contributors examine DIY activism, describing new modes of civic engagement that include Harry Potter fan activism and the activities of the Yes Men. They consider DIY making in learning, culture, hacking, and the arts, including do-it-yourself media production and collaborative documentary making. They discuss DIY and design and how citizens can unlock the black box of technological infrastructures to engage and innovate open and participatory critical making. And they explore DIY and media, describing activists' efforts to remake and reimagine media and the public sphere. As these chapters make clear, DIY is characterized by its emphasis on “doing” and making rather than passive consumption. DIY citizens assume active roles as interventionists, makers, hackers, modders, and tinkerers, in pursuit of new forms of engaged and participatory democracy. Contributors Mike Ananny, Chris Atton, Alexandra Bal, Megan Boler, Catherine Burwell, Red Chidgey, Andrew Clement, Negin Dahya, Suzanne de Castell, Carl DiSalvo, Kevin Driscoll, Christina Dunbar-Hester, Joseph Ferenbok, Stephanie Fisher, Miki Foster, Stephen Gilbert, Henry Jenkins, Jennifer Jenson, Yasmin B. Kafai, Ann Light, Steve Mann, Joel McKim, Brenda McPhail, Owen McSwiney, Joshua McVeigh-Schultz, Graham Meikle, Emily Rose Michaud, Kate Milberry, Michael Murphy, Jason Nolan, Kate Orton-Johnson, Kylie A. Peppler, David J. Phillips, Karen Pollock, Matt Ratto, Ian Reilly, Rosa Reitsamer, Mandy Rose, Daniela K. Rosner, Yukari Seko, Karen Louise Smith, Lana Swartz, Alex Tichine, Jennette Weber, Elke Zobl
Categories: Computers

Rethinking Youth Citizenship After the Age of Entitlement

Rethinking Youth Citizenship After the Age of Entitlement

DIY citizenship is often associated with democratic innovation. As Harris and Roose note, 'this emergent citizen-type' is associated with 'new kinds of definitions, styles and practices of civic engagement' (2013:8).

Author: Lucas Walsh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781474248044

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 232

View: 513

Rethinking Youth Citizenship After the Age of Entitlement provides a primer for exploring hard questions about how young people understand, experience and enact their citizenship in uncertain times and about their senses of membership and belonging. It examines how familiar modes of exclusion are compounded by punitive youth policies in ways that are concealed by neoliberal discourses. It considers the role of key institutions in constructing young people's citizenship and looks at the ways in which some young people are opting out of established enactments of citizenship while creating new ones. Critically reflecting on recent scholarly interest in the geographical, relational, affective and temporal dimensions of young people's experiences of citizenship, it also reinvigorates the discussion about citizenship rights and entitlements, and what these might mean for young people. The book draws on global research and theories of citizenship but has a particular focus on Australia, which provides a unique example of a country that has fared well economically yet is mimicking the austerity measures of the United Kingdom and Europe. It concludes with an argument for a rethinking of citizenship which recognises young people's rights as citizens and the ways in which these interact with their lived experience at a time that has been characterised as 'the end of the age of entitlement'.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Themes and Critical Debates in Contemporary Journalism

Themes and Critical Debates in Contemporary Journalism

This can be seen in the concept of DIY-citizenship. Hartley (1999, 2010) has claimed that such a form of citizenship is based upon a “radically decontextualized network of meanings which locate identity in the mediasphere” (179) and on ...

Author: Verica Rupar

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443873703

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 165

View: 867

The old definitions of journalism are under fire; its occupational identity and importance to democracy, public life, and social justice are contested, while the content, technologies, practices and cultural conditions of production of news are changing. Contemporary developments signal significant shifts in the ways journalism is practiced, conceptualized and taught. This book, written in the context of the World Journalism Education Congress (WJEC) held in 2016 at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, offers a collection of essays on some of the key concepts, categories and models that have underpinned WJEC discussions about journalism research and pedagogy. The overall theme of the congress – integrity and the identity of journalism and journalism education across the globe – generated rigorous debate about journalism studies and its distinctiveness and subject matter, and the journalism curriculum today.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Changing on the Fly

Changing on the Fly

In: DIY. Citizenship. If there is no will to remember certain people, events, or artifacts (Parsons & Stern, 2012), it is difficult to challenge the dominant narrative. The obvious answer is to alter the institutional barriers by ...

Author: Courtney Szto

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9781978807952

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 208

View: 393

Hockey and multiculturalism are often noted as defining features of Canadian culture; yet, rarely are we forced to question the relationship and tensions between these two social constructs. This book examines the growing significance of hockey in Canada’s South Asian communities. The Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi broadcast serves as an entry point for a broader consideration of South Asian experiences in hockey culture based on field work and interviews conducted with hockey players, parents, and coaches in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. This book seeks to inject more “color” into hockey’s historically white dominated narratives and representations by returning hockey culture to its multicultural roots. It encourages alternative and multiple narratives about hockey and cultural citizenship by asking which citizens are able to contribute to the webs of meaning that form the nation’s cultural fabric.
Categories: Sports & Recreation

Digital Materialities

Digital Materialities

In the set of practices and discourses around DIY the concept of citizenship/citizen is a huge concern; it is now at the core of almost all references around the topic. For the people who are involved in activities that they believe are ...

Author: Sarah Pink

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000189766

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 655

As the distinction between the digital and the material world becomes increasingly blurred, the ways in which we think about design are also shifting and evolving. How can the human, digital and material be brought together to intervene in the world? What constitutes our digital-material environments? How can we engage with digital technologies to make sustainable, healthy and meaningful decisions, both now and in the future? Digital Materialities presents twelve chapters by scholars and practitioners working at the intersection between design and digital research in the UK, Spain, Australia and the USA. By incorporating in-depth understandings of the digital-material world from both the social sciences and design, the book considers how this combined knowledge might advance our capacity to design for the future. Divided into three parts, the focus of the book moves from the theoretical to the practical: how different digital materialities are imagined and emerge, through software emulation, urban sensors and smart homes; how new digital designs are sparked through collaborations between social scientists and designers; and finally, how digital design emerges from the insider work of everyday designers. A fascinating, ground-breaking book for students and scholars of digital anthropology, media and communication, and anyone interested in the future of digital design.
Categories: Social Science

Uses of Television

Uses of Television

She is the 'D-I-Y' or Do-It-Yourself citizen. In Britain, 'DIY' is familiar as the amateur end of home-improvement – installing the material basis for the ideology of domesticity in the form of particle-board, paint and a patio.

Author: John Hartley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134886456

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 865

How does television function within society? Why have both its programmes and its audiences been so widely denigrated? Taking inspiration from Richard Hoggarts classic study The Uses of Literacy, John Hartleys new book is a lucid defence of the place of television in our lives, and of the usefulness of television studies. Hartley re-conceptualizes television as a transmodern medium, capable of reuniting government, education and media, and of creating a new kind of cultural teaching which facilitates communication across social and geographical boundaries. He provides a historical framework for the development of both television and television studies, his focus ranging from an analysis of the early documentary Housing Problems, to the much-overlooked cultural impact of the refrigerator.
Categories: Social Science

Crafting Dissent

Crafting Dissent

This expansion elaborates on the work of sociologist Kate Orton-Johnson who, in her essay DIY Citizenship, Critical Making, and Community, argues that (digitally mediated) knitting creates spaces for local and global connectivity as ...

Author: Hinda Mandell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781538118405

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 169

Pussyhats, typically crafted with yarn, quite literally created a sea of pink the day after Donald J. Trump became the 45th president of the United States in January 2017, as the inaugural Women’s March unfolded throughout the U.S., and sister cities globally. But there was nothing new about women crafting as a means of dissent. Crafting Dissent: Handicraft as Protest from the American Revolution to the Pussyhats is the first book that demonstrates how craft, typically involving the manipulation of yarn, thread and fabric, has also been used as a subversive tool throughout history and up to the present day, to push back against government policy and social norms that crafters perceive to be harmful to them, their bodies, their families, their ideals relating to equality and human rights, and their aspirations. At the heart of the book is an exploration for how craft is used by citizens to engage with the rhetoric and policy shaping their country’s public sphere. The book is divided into three sections: "Crafting Histories," Politics of Craft," and "Crafting Cultural Conversations." Three features make this a unique contribution to the field of craft activism and history: The inclusion of diverse contributors from a global perspective (including from England, Ireland, India, New Zealand, Australia) Essay formats including photo essays, personal essays and scholarly investigations The variety of professional backgrounds among the book’s contributors, including academics, museum curators, art therapists, small business owners, provocateurs, artists and makers. This book explains that while handicraft and craft-motivated activism may appear to be all the rage and “of the moment,” a long thread reveals its roots as far back as the founding of American Democracy, and at key turning points throughout the history of nations throughout the world.
Categories: History

Citizenship Activism and the City

Citizenship  Activism and the City

'Just Say Yes: DIY-ing the Yes Men', in Matt Ratto and Megan Boler (eds), DIY Citizenship: Critical Making and Social Media, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 127–136. Ridgley, Jennifer. 2008. 'Cities of Refuge: Immigration Enforcement, Police, ...

Author: Patricia Burke Wood

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781351719292

Category: Science

Page: 136

View: 178

Were the occupations of 2010–11 – from Spain to Tahrir Square to Occupy Wall Street – a success or failure? Are they the model for urban radical politics? This book challenges common understandings and underlying assumptions of what constitutes activism and resistance. It proposes a critical urban theory of politics and citizenship that is grounded in the city as it is inhabited. For those who are marginalized, the city is a double-edged sword of oppression and emancipation. This book argues for an intersectional approach that actively dismantles hierarchies and embraces a wider range of acts of resistance and creative transformation, one in which we recognize these acts of citizenship as a form of constitutionalism. Wood reframes the theorization of protest and of the city, 'post-political' literature and the history of protest, and Marxist and anarchist ideas about the time and space of politics. Through this, she adopts a unique approach to provide new theoretical insights and challenges to post-political thinking. This book will be valuable reading for those interested in political, urban and social geography, in addition to political economy and progressive politics in the urban context.
Categories: Science