Everyday Las Vegas

Everyday Las Vegas

Instead, I prefer the moniker provided by a book of essays about the personality, unique spirit, and mystique of the state: East of Eden, West of Zion. The name comes from an analysis by William D. Rowley11, a historian at the ...

Author: Rex J. Rowley

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874179064

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 458

Every year, more than thirty-five million people from all over the world visit Las Vegas; only two million call the city home. Everyday Las Vegas takes a close look at the lives of those who live in a place the rest of the world considers exotic, even decadent. Using broad research, including interviews with more than one hundred Las Vegans, Rex Rowley--who grew up in Las Vegas--examines everyday life in a place that markets itself as an escape from mundane reality. Rowley considers such topics as why people move to Las Vegas, the nature of their work and personal lives, the impact of growth and rapid change, and interaction with the overwhelmingly touristic side of the city. He also considers the benefits and perils of living in a nonstop twenty-four-hour city rich in entertainment options and easy access to gambling, drugs, and other addictions. His examination includes the previously unstudied role of neighborhood casinos patronized by locals rather than tourists and the impact that a very mobile population has on schools, churches, and community life. Rowley considers the very different ways people perceive a place as insiders or outsiders, a dichotomy that arises when tourism is a mainstay of the local economy. His work offers insights into what Las Vegas can teach us about other cities and American culture in general. It also contributes to our understanding of how people relate to places and how the personality of a place influences the lives of people who live there.
Categories: Social Science

American West

American West

East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989). Stegner, Page, Marking the Sparrow's Fall: The Making of the American West (New York: Henry Holt, 1998). Stevens, Joseph, Hoover Dam: An American ...

Author: Karen R. Jones

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748629732

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 789

The American West used to be a story of gunfights, glory, wagon trails, and linear progress. Historians such as Frederick Jackson Turner and Hollywood movies such as Stagecoach (1939) and Shane (1953) cast the trans-Mississippi region as a frontier of epic proportions where 'savagery' met 'civilization' and boys became men.During the late 1980s, this old way of seeing the West came under heavy fire. Scholars such as Patricia Nelson Limerick and Richard White forged a fresh story of the region, a new vision of the West, based around the conquest of peoples and landscapes.This book explores the bipolar world of Turner's Old West and Limerick's New West and reveals the values and ambiguities associated with both historical traditions. Sections on Lewis and Clark, the frontier and the cowboy sit alongside work on Indian genocide and women's trail diaries. Images of the region as seen through the arcade Western, Hollywood film and Disney theme parks confirm the West as a symbolic and contested landscape.Tapping into popular fascination with the Cowboy, Hollywood movies, the Indian Wars, and Custer's Last Stand, the authors show the reader how to deconstruct the imagery and reality surrounding Western history.Key Features*Uses popular subjects (the Cowboy, Hollywood westerns, the Indian Wars, and Custer's Last Stand) to enliven the text*Includes 13 b+w illustrations*Interdisciplinary approach covers film, literature, art and historical artefacts
Categories: History

Reclaiming the Arid West

Reclaiming the Arid West

Russell R. Elliott , “ Nevada's Mining Heritage : Blessing and Burden , " in East of Eden , West of Zion : Essays on Nevada , Wilbur S. Shepperson , ed . ( Reno : University of Nevada Press , 1989 ) , 47–48 . Yerington to D. O. Mills ...

Author: William D. Rowley

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253330025

Category: Political Science

Page: 199

View: 232

Widely noted for his role in the passage of the National Reclamation Act of 1902, Francis G. Newlands of Nevada was a champion of the growth of federal power in the modernization of America. One of the few liberal national Democrats at the beginning of the twentieth century, he is known as a key architect of the modern regulatory state. Newlands worked to irrigate the Nevada desert and other arid western states with nationally funded reclamation and dam-building projects. As a leading western Progressive, he supported national planning for the utilization of all the nation's water resources, the Progressive conservation cause espoused by Republican Theodore Roosevelt, and the supervision of private corporations by an enlarged and more powerful federal government. Yet he opposed Progressives on many issues, voicing suspicions about centralized banking, defending the right of private corporations to fair treatment by public regulatory agencies, even advocating the denial of suffrage to African Americans through the repeal of the Fifteenth Amendment. William Rowley's biography reveals a complicated and sophisticated man who successfully lived a dual political life under a cloud of personal and public scandal. It is a fascinating story of American politics in a time of immense national change.
Categories: Political Science

God s Red Son

God s Red Son

Smith quoted in C. Elizabeth Raymond, “Sense of Place in the Great Basin,” in East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada, edited by Wilbur S. Shepperson (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989), 18; John C. Frémont and William Hemsley ...

Author: Louis S. Warren

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780465098682

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 535

The definitive account of the Ghost Dance religion, which led to the infamous massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890 Winner of the Bancroft Prize in American History In 1890, on Indian reservations across the West, followers of a new religion danced in circles until they collapsed into trances. In an attempt to suppress this new faith, the US Army killed over two hundred Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee Creek. In God's Red Son, historian Louis Warren offers a startling new view of the religion known as the Ghost Dance, from its origins in the visions of a Northern Paiute named Wovoka to the tragedy in South Dakota. To this day, the Ghost Dance remains widely mischaracterized as a primitive and failed effort by Indian militants to resist American conquest and return to traditional ways. In fact, followers of the Ghost Dance sought to thrive in modern America by working for wages, farming the land, and educating their children, tenets that helped the religion endure for decades after Wounded Knee. God's Red Son powerfully reveals how Ghost Dance teachings helped Indians retain their identity and reshape the modern world.
Categories: History

Nevada

Nevada

East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989. ———. Mirage-Land: Images of Nevada. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1992. ———. Restless Strangers: Nevada's Immigrants and Their Interpreters.

Author: Michael S. Green

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874179743

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 926

Nevada: A History of the Silver State has been named a CHOICE Outstanding Title. Michael S. Green, a leading Nevada historian, provides a detailed survey of the Silver State’s past, from the arrival of the early European explorers, to the predominance of mining in the 1800s, to the rise of world-class tourism in the twentieth century, and to more recent attempts to diversify the economy. Of the numerous themes central to Green’s analysis of Nevada’s history, luck plays a significant role in the state’s growth. The miners and gamblers who first visited the state all bet on luck. Today, the biggest contributor to Nevada’s tourist economy, gaming, still relies on that same belief in luck. Nevada’s financial system has generally been based on a “one industry” economy, first mining and, more recently, gaming. Green delves deeply into the limitations of this structure, while also exploring the theme of exploitation of the land and the overuse of the state’s natural resources. Green covers many more aspects of the Silver State’s narrative, including the dominance of one region of the state over another, political forces and corruption, and the citizens’ often tumultuous relationship with the federal government. The book will appeal to scholars, students, and other readers interested in Nevada history.
Categories: History

A Great Basin Mosaic

A Great Basin Mosaic

Westering Man: The Life of Joseph Walker. New York: Atheneum, 1983. ... “Wall Street West: Action in West Wendover,” in East of Eden: West of Zion: Essays on Nevada, Wilbur S. Shepperson, ed. Reno, Las Vegas: University of Nevada Press, ...

Author: James W. Hulse

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874174663

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 582

The Nevada of lesser-known cities, towns, and outposts deserve their separate chronicles, and here Hulse fills a wide gap. He contributes in a text rich with memories tramping through rural Nevada as a child, then as a journalist seeking news and gossip, then later as an academic historian and a parent trying to share the wonders of the high desert with his family. Nobody is more qualified to write about the cultural nuances of rural Nevada than Hulse, who retired after 35 years as a professor of history at University of Nevada, Reno. Robert Laxalt wrote an article in National Geographic in 1974 entitled “The Other Nevada” in which he referred to “the Nevada that has been eclipsed by the tinsel trimmings of Las Vegas, the round-the-clock casinos, the ski slopes of the Sierra. It is a Nevada that few tourists see.” With this book Hulse reflects on Laxalt’s insights and shows changes—often slow-moving and incremental—that have occurred since then. Much of the terrain of rural Nevada has not changed at all, while others have adapted to technological revolutions of recent times. Hulse states that there is no single “other” Nevada, but several subcultures with distinct features. He offers a tour of sorts to what John Muir called the “bewildering abundance” of the Nevada landscape.
Categories: History

Believing In Place

Believing In Place

In East of Eden, West of Zion. Ed. Wilbur S. Shepperson, 17–29. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989. ———. “Desert/Paradise: Images of Nevada Landscape.” Nevada Public Affairs Review no. 1 (1988): 12–18. Redfield, James.

Author: Richard V. Francaviglia

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874175806

Category: Nature

Page: 312

View: 784

The austere landscape of the Great Basin has inspired diverse responses from the people who have moved through or settled in it. Author Richard V. Francaviglia is interested in the connection between environment and spirituality in the Great Basin, for here, he says, "faith and landscape conspire to resurrect old myths and create new ones." As a geographer, Francaviglia knows that place means more than physical space. Human perceptions and interpretations are what give place its meaning. In Believing in Place, he examines the varying human perceptions of and relationships with the Great Basin landscape, from the region's Native American groups to contemporary tourists and politicians, to determine the spiritual issues that have shaped our connections with this place. In doing so, he considers the creation and flood myths of several cultures, the impact of the Judeo-Christian tradition and individualism, Native American animism and shamanist traditions, the Mormon landscape, the spiritual dimensions of gambling, the religious foundations of Cold War ideology, stories of UFOs and alien presence, and the convergence of science and spirituality. Believing in Place is a profound and totally engaging reflection on the ways that human needs and spiritual traditions can shape our perceptions of the land. That the Great Basin has inspired such a complex variety of responses is partly due to its enigmatic vastness and isolation, partly to the remarkable range of peoples who have found themselves in the region. Using not only the materials of traditional geography but folklore, anthropology, Native American and Euro-American religion, contemporary politics, and New Age philosophies, Francaviglia has produced a fascinating and timely investigation of the role of human conceptions of place in that space we call the Great Basin.
Categories: Nature

Literary Nevada

Literary Nevada

East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989. 189 pp. A fine set of interpretive essays by historians and novelists, reflecting on Nevada's past to understand its present at century's end.

Author: Cheryll Glotfelty

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874170122

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 896

View: 941

Over 200 writings about Nevada with selections from Native American tales to contemporary writings on urban experience and environmental concerns. The state of Nevada embodies paradox and contradiction—home to one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and to isolated ranches scattered across a sparsely populated backcountry. Nevada is a place where the lust for sudden wealth has prompted both wild mining booms and glittering casinos, and where forbidding atomic test sites coexist with alluring tourist meccas. The variety and distinctiveness of Nevada’s landscape and peoples have inspired writers from the beginning of immigrant contact with the region. This contact has produced abundant literary wealth that includes the rich oral traditions of Native American peoples and an amazing spectrum of contemporary voices. Literary Nevada is the first comprehensive literary anthology of Nevada. It contains over 200 selections ranging from traditional Native American tales, explorers’ and emigrants’ accounts, and writing from the Comstock Lode and other mining boomtowns, as well as compelling fiction, poetry, and essays from throughout the state’s history. There is work by well-known Nevada writers such as Sarah Winnemucca, Mark Twain, and Robert Laxalt, by established and emerging writers from all parts of the state, and by some nonresident authors whose work illuminates important facets of the Nevada experience. The book includes cowboy poetry, travel writing, accounts of nuclear Nevada, narratives about rural life and urban life in Las Vegas and Reno, poetry and fiction from the state’s best contemporary writers, and accounts of the special beauty of wild Nevada’s mountains and deserts. Editor Cheryll Glotfelty provides insightful introductions to each section and author. The book also includes a photo gallery of selected Nevada writers and a generous list of suggested further readings. Nevada has inspired an exceptionally rich panorama of fine writing and a dazzling array of literary voices. The selections in Literary Nevada will engage and delight readers while revealing the complex and exciting diversity of the state’s history, people, and life.
Categories: Literary Collections

At Pyramid Lake

At Pyramid Lake

In History and Humanities: Essays in Honor of Wilbur S. Shepperson, edited by Francis X. Hartigan, 105–20. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989. ———. “Sense of Place in the Great Basin.” In East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada ...

Author: Bernard Mergen

Publisher: University of Nevada Press

ISBN: 9780874179408

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 136

Pyramid Lake is one of the largest lakes in the Great Basin, the terminus of the Truckee River flowing from Lake Tahoe into northern Nevada. This desert oasis, with a surface area of nearly two hundred square miles, is a unique geological feature and was home to the Paiute for thousands of years before the arrival of explorer John C. Frémont in 1844. For the Paiute, it was a spiritual center that provided life-sustaining resources, such as the cui-ui, a fish unique to the lake and now endangered. For the ranchers and farmers who settled on tribal lands, the waters that flowed into it were necessary to raise cattle and crops. Mergen tells how these competing interests have interacted with the lake and with each other, from the Paiute War of 1860 to the present. The lake’s very existence was threatened by dams and water diversion; it was saved by tribal claims, favorable court decisions, improved water laws, and the rise of environmentalism. At Pyramid Lake is about more than Indians and water wars, however. It is the story of railroads on the reservation and the role of federal, state, and private groups interested in sportfishing. It is about scientists, artists, and tourists who were captivated by the lake’s beauty. Finally, it is also a story of the lake as a place of spiritual renewal and celebration. Mergen grew up near its shores in the 1940s and returned frequently through the years. In this cultural history, he combines his personal remembrances with other source material, including novels, poetry, newspaper and magazine journalism, unpublished manuscripts, and private conversations, to paint a fascinating portrait of one of Nevada’s natural wonders.
Categories: History

Historic Nevada Waters

Historic Nevada Waters

East of Eden, West of Zion: Essays on Nevada.” Edited and introduction by Wilber S. Shepperson, Shepperson Series in History and Humanities No. 26. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1989, pp. 30–40. _____. Nevada: A History.

Author: Hunt Janin

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476672618

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 676

The Great Basin is a hydrographic region that includes most of Nevada and parts of five other Western states. The histories of four of the Western rivers of the Great Basin—the Walker, the Truckee, the Carson and the Humboldt—are explored in this book, along with three of the western lakes of the Great Basin: Lake Tahoe, Pyramid Lake, and Walker Lake. Drawing on a range of sources, the coauthors address both the natural and the human aspects of the history and likely futures of Great Basin waterways.
Categories: History