Embodying the Dead

Embodying the Dead

In our practice, we embody and encounter deadness in forms that are contradictory; we play dead, embody zombies, imitate dead icons, we animate stuffed animals to playfully critique the living. We reimagine dead acts as an anagram for ...

Author: Claire Hind

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781137602930

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 232

View: 961

Where do we find the dead? Do the dead appear in our dreams? What is it like to play dead? This book is an exciting exploration of the relationship between death and play in performance. Exploring a range of artists and creative disciplines that remember, personify and re-imagine the dead, it playfully unpacks the psychoanalytic concepts of the Death Drive, Desire and the Uncanny as a way of thinking about performance. Embodying the Dead draws on work of Gary Winters and Claire Hind and the various qualities of deadness found in their projects. The authors' work includes live art, theatre, installation, Super 8mm film, walking arts practice and durational performance. This book includes scripts and scores of their performances, original creative texts, interviews with internationally renowned artists and a series of practice-led research tasks to support readers creating their own imaginative performance work. Rich in creative and critical content, this book is ideal for students of drama, theatre and performance studies who have an interest in devised theatre, theatre making, writing for performance and intermedial practice.
Categories: Performing Arts

Embodying Mexico

Embodying Mexico

After the Revolution: Imaging and Embodying Mexico In the twenty-first century, the Dance of the Old Men and Night of the Dead of Lake Pátzcuaro are engaged as iconic embodied referents of Mexicanness and of authentic and indigenous ...

Author: Ruth Hellier-Tinoco

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199712731

Category: Music

Page: 360

View: 729

Embodying Mexico examines two performative icons of Mexicanness--the Dance of the Old Men and Night of the Dead of Lake Pátzcuaro--in numerous manifestations, including film, theater, tourist guides, advertisements, and souvenirs. Covering a ninety-year period from the postrevolutionary era to the present day, Hellier-Tinoco's analysis is thoroughly grounded in Mexican politics and history, and simultaneously incorporates choreographic, musicological, and dramaturgical analysis. Exploring multiple contexts in Mexico, the USA, and Europe, Embodying Mexico expands and enriches our understanding of complex processes of creating national icons, performance repertoires, and tourist attractions, drawing on wide-ranging ethnographic, archival, and participatory experience. An extensive companion website illustrates the author's arguments through audio and video.
Categories: Music

Embodying Health Identities

Embodying Health Identities

Through a form of rite of passage (see Chapter 6) which involves attaching the child to a whole variety of machines and monitors, children 'lie enigmatically between being alive and being dead, and between being social and non-social ...

Author: Allison James

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780230211759

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 745

How do we know we are ill? Are health, illness and disability universal categories? How important is the body in our understanding of health? These crucial questions are just some of the issues tackled in this comprehensive and insightful new book. Embodying Health Identities offers a fundamental account of the sociology of health, exploring the relationship between health and identity through a focus on embodiment. Bringing together existing literature with new cutting edge theories, the authors investigate the implications of the body on our experiences of health and illness and its role in how health, illness and identity relate to each other. The text begins by outlining the key concepts of health and illness, and then continues with an exploration of the social factors which impact on health and a consideration of the journey of illness, from causation to treatment, across the life course. Throughout the text, theoretical arguments are effectively illustrated with contemporary examples taken from every day life and a diverse range of cultures. Written by two reputed authors in the field, this accessible text offers stimulating and refreshing reading for all students of the sociology and anthropology of health.
Categories: Social Science

Embodied Archive

Embodied Archive

Frenk's focus, however, is on the disability of our contemporary times, understood, in a troubling sense, as embodied by those who are neither “entirely healthy” nor “entirely dead.” This devaluation of disabled life, ...

Author: Susan Antebi

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472038503

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 109

Disability and racial difference in Mexico's early post-revolutionary period
Categories: Social Science

Television and the Embodied Viewer

Television and the Embodied Viewer

death. As Thompson explains, in the Western view of death, “there cannot be any phenomenology of death, for experience ceases to exist at death” (2015, 285). This aligns with Vivian Sobchack's view, who writes that “... the event of ...

Author: Marsha F. Cassidy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315282633

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 216

View: 697

Television and the Sensate Body in the Digital Age appraises the medium’s capacity to evoke sensations and bodily feelings in the viewer. Presenting a fresh approach to television studies, the book examines the sensate force of onscreen bodies and illustrates how TV’s multisensory appeal builds viewer empathy and animates meaning. The book draws extensively upon interpretive viewpoints in the humanities to shed light on a range of provocative television works, notably The Americans, Mad Men, Little Women: LA, and Six Feet Under, with emphasis on the dramatization of gender, disability, sex, childbearing, and death. Advocating a biocultural approach that takes into account the mind sciences, Cassidy argues that interpretive meanings, shaped within today’s dynamic cultural matrix, are amplified by somatic experience. At a time when questions of embodiment and affect are crossing disciplines, this book will appeal to scholars and students working in the fields of television, film, and media studies, both in the humanities and cognitive traditions.
Categories: Performing Arts

Embodied Lives

Embodied Lives

... gods created worlds through scat- tering their sperm; men had gigantic genitalia; and their penises enjoyed erec- tion in death. There is ample evidence here that human beings were embodied differently in the phenomenal world, ...

Author: Rosemary A. Joyce

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317724551

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 895

Examining a wide range of archaeological data, and using it to explore issues such as the sexual body, mind/body dualism, body modification, and magical practices, Lynn Meskell and Rosemary Joyce offer a new approach to the Ancient Egyptian and Mayan understanding of embodiment. Drawing on insights from feminist theory, art history, phenomenology, anthropology and psychoanalysis, the book takes bodily materiality as a crucial starting point to the understanding and formation of self in any society, and sheds new light on Ancient Egyptian and Maya cultures. The book shows how a comparative project can open up new lines of inquiry by raising questions about accepted assumptions as the authors draw attention to the long-term histories and specificities of embodiment, and make the case for the importance of ancient materials for contemporary theorization of the body. For students new to the subject, and scholars already familiar with it, this will offer fresh and exciting insights into these ancient cultures.
Categories: Social Science

A Traffic of Dead Bodies

A Traffic of Dead Bodies

A Traffic of Dead Bodies enters the sphere of bodysnatching medical students, dissection-room pranks, and anatomical fantasy.

Author: Michael Sappol

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691186146

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 340

A Traffic of Dead Bodies enters the sphere of bodysnatching medical students, dissection-room pranks, and anatomical fantasy. It shows how nineteenth-century American physicians used anatomy to develop a vital professional identity, while claiming authority over the living and the dead. It also introduces the middle-class women and men, working people, unorthodox healers, cultural radicals, entrepreneurs, and health reformers who resisted and exploited anatomy to articulate their own social identities and visions. The nineteenth century saw the rise of the American medical profession: a proliferation of practitioners, journals, organizations, sects, and schools. Anatomy lay at the heart of the medical curriculum, allowing American medicine to invest itself with the authority of European science. Anatomists crossed the boundary between life and death, cut into the body, reduced it to its parts, framed it with moral commentary, and represented it theatrically, visually, and textually. Only initiates of the dissecting room could claim the privileged healing status that came with direct knowledge of the body. But anatomy depended on confiscation of the dead--mainly the plundered bodies of African Americans, immigrants, Native Americans, and the poor. As black markets in cadavers flourished, so did a cultural obsession with anatomy, an obsession that gave rise to clashes over the legal, social, and moral status of the dead. Ministers praised or denounced anatomy from the pulpit; rioters sacked medical schools; and legislatures passed or repealed laws permitting medical schools to take the bodies of the destitute. Dissection narratives and representations of the anatomical body circulated in new places: schools, dime museums, popular lectures, minstrel shows, and sensationalist novels. Michael Sappol resurrects this world of graverobbers and anatomical healers, discerning new ligatures among race and gender relations, funerary practices, the formation of the middle-class, and medical professionalization. In the process, he offers an engrossing and surprisingly rich cultural history of nineteenth-century America.
Categories: History

Embodied Geographies

Embodied Geographies

Along with birth, death claims a central place in many cultures as one of the universal rites of passage. In positing a tripartite structure of rites (namely, separation, transition and incorporation), van Gennep (1960) is of the view ...

Author: Elizabeth Kenworthy Teather

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134668823

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 832

Embodied Geographies provides a comprehensive account of different types of life crises which develop our identities and affect how we live our lives. Chapters focus on: * pregnancy, childbirth, teenagers and parenthood * migration * the threat and reality of violence * illness and disability * bereavement, the ensuing family responsibilities and death itself. It includes case studies from the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, Canada and the USA.
Categories: Science

Embodied Collective Memory

Embodied Collective Memory

Similarly, such Quixotic gestures are dead embodied collective memory. But when alive, shared gestural memories provide a shared phenomenology of mutual recognizability for social actors, so that, beyond cognition, individuals can sense ...

Author: Rafael F. Narvaez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780761858799

Category: Philosophy

Page: 222

View: 965

The human body is not a given fact—it is acquired, achieved, and learned. The body remembers, and it does so in collectively relevant ways. This book discusses how, why, and to what extent corporeal memories are constructed but also resisted, modified, or created anew.
Categories: Philosophy

Embodied History

Embodied History

Dead. Bodies. Illness, disease, and injury were everyday occurrences and experiences for Philadelphia's lower sort, and while some recovered their health many more died in and around their homes and workplaces. Death was a public ritual ...

Author: Simon P. Newman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812218480

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 222

Offering a new view into the lives and experiences of plebeian men and women, and a provocative exploration of the history of the body itself, Embodied History approaches the bodies of the poor in early national Philadelphia as texts to be read and interpreted. Through a close examination of accounts of the bodies that appeared in runaway advertisements and in seafaring, almshouse, prison, hospital, and burial records, Simon P. Newman uses physical details to paint an entirely different portrait of the material circumstances of the poor, examining the ways they became categorized in the emerging social hierarchy, and how they sought to resist such categorization. The Philadelphians examined in Embodied History were members of the lower sort, a social category that emerged in the early modern period from the belief in a society composed of natural orders and ranks. The population of the urban poor grew rapidly after the American Revolution, and middling and elite citizens were frightened by these poor bodies, from the tattooed professional sailor, to the African American runaway with a highly personalized hairstyle and distinctive mannerisms and gestures, to the vigorous and lively Irish prostitute who refused to be cowed by the condemnation of others, to the hardworking laboring family whose weakened and diseased children played and sang in the alleys. In a new republic premised on liberty and equality, the rapidly increasing ranks of unruly bodies threatened to overwhelm traditional notions of deference, hierarchy, and order. Affluent Philadelphians responded by employing runaway advertisements, the almshouse, the prison, and to a lesser degree the hospital to incarcerate, control, and correct poor bodies and transform them into well-dressed, hardworking, deferential members of society. Embodied History is a compelling and accessible exploration of how poverty was etched and how power and discipline were enacted upon the bodies of the poor, as well as how the poor attempted to transcend such discipline through assertions of bodily agency and liberty.
Categories: History