Endangered Maize

Endangered Maize

“Germplasm Resources Information (GRIP) Update,” Maize Crop Advisory Committee, First Meeting Report, 1981, Goodman Papers, box 49, folder 4. 38. “A National Program for Germplasm Enhancement,” encl. in Douglas Dewey to Crop Advisory ...

Author: Helen Anne Curry

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520307681

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 400

"Many people worry that we're losing genetic diversity in the foods we eat. Over the past century, crop varieties standardized for industrial agriculture have increasingly dominated farm fields. Concerned about what this transition means for the future of food, scientists, farmers, and eaters have sought to protect crop plants they consider endangered. They have organized high-tech genebanks and heritage seed swaps. They have combed fields for ancient landraces and sought farmers growing Indigenous varieties. Behind this widespread concern for the loss of plant diversity lies another extinction narrative about the survival of farmers themselves, a story that is often obscured by urgent calls to collect and preserve. Endangered Maize draws on the rich history of corn in Mexico and the United States to trace the motivations behind these hidden extinction stories and show how they shaped the conservation strategies adopted by scientists, states, and citizens. In Endangered Maize, historian Helen Anne Curry investigates more than a hundred years of agriculture and conservation practices to understand the tasks that farmers and researchers have considered essential to maintaining crop diversity. Through the contours of efforts to preserve diversity in one of the world's most important crops, Curry reveals how conservationists forged their methods around expectations of social, political, and economic transformations that would eliminate diverse communities and cultures. In this fascinating study of how cultural narratives shape science, Curry argues for new understandings of endangerment and alternative strategies to protect and preserve crop diversity"--
Categories: History

Endangered Maize

Endangered Maize

Endangered Maize draws on the rich history of corn in Mexico and the United States to trace the motivations behind these hidden extinction stories and show how they shaped the conservation strategies adopted by scientists, states, and ...

Author: Helen Anne Curry

Publisher:

ISBN: 0520307690

Category:

Page: 336

View: 271

Charting the political, social, and environmental history of efforts to conserve crop diversity. Many people worry that we're losing genetic diversity in the foods we eat. Over the past century, crop varieties standardized for industrial agriculture have increasingly dominated farm fields. Concerned about what this transition means for the future of food, scientists, farmers, and eaters have sought to protect crop plants they consider endangered. They have organized high-tech genebanks and heritage seed swaps. They have combed fields for ancient landraces and sought farmers growing Indigenous varieties. Behind this widespread concern for the loss of plant diversity lies another extinction narrative about the survival of farmers themselves, a story that is often obscured by urgent calls to collect and preserve. Endangered Maize draws on the rich history of corn in Mexico and the United States to trace the motivations behind these hidden extinction stories and show how they shaped the conservation strategies adopted by scientists, states, and citizens. In Endangered Maize, historian Helen Anne Curry investigates more than a hundred years of agriculture and conservation practices to understand the tasks that farmers and researchers have considered essential to maintaining crop diversity. Through the contours of efforts to preserve diversity in one of the world's most important crops, Curry reveals how conservationists forged their methods around expectations of social, political, and economic transformations that would eliminate diverse communities and cultures. In this fascinating study of how cultural narratives shape science, Curry argues for new understandings of endangerment and alternative strategies to protect and preserve crop diversity.
Categories:

New Approaches to the Economics of Plant Health

New Approaches to the Economics of Plant Health

By identifying the regions where maize is grown and overlaying it with climatic areas suitable for WCR development , the annual area of endangered maize could be determined ( Baker et al . 2003 ) . The model also used a triangular ...

Author: Alfons G.J.M. Oude Lansink

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402058268

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 202

View: 354

Governments respond to increased phytosanitary risks by imposing trade-restricting measures.
Categories: Business & Economics

Plants Genes and Crop Biotechnology

Plants  Genes  and Crop Biotechnology

Myth 1 : The monarch butterfly is endangered by Bt corn . The beautiful monarch butterfly ( Figure 20.2 ) has become a powerful rallying symbol for the forces opposed to GM technology . They maintain that Bt maize threatens the ...

Author: Maarten J. Chrispeels

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning

ISBN: 0763715867

Category: Science

Page: 562

View: 614

This book integrates many fields to help students understand the complexity of the basic science that underlies crop and food production.
Categories: Science

Biological Control

Biological Control

Sweet maize is planexpect that T. nubilale could not parasitize eggs of ted and matures over a longer period than field the rare or endangered species of Lepidoptera in maize in Minnesota . Because O. nubilalis oviposit Minnesota when ...

Author: Heikki M. T. Hokkanen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 052154405X

Category: Medical

Page: 328

View: 870

This book is the outcome of a unique gathering of thirty top specialists in the world to discuss and debate the benefits and risks associated with biological control.
Categories: Medical

Eating to Extinction

Eating to Extinction

When I talk about diversity and people say to me “it's only maize”, I tell them about these farmers.' The grassroots movement Sin Maíz, No Hay País (Without Maize ... he is giving Mexico's endangered landrace maize varieties a lifeline.

Author: Dan Saladino

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9780374605339

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 455

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice What Saladino finds in his adventures are people with soul-deep relationships to their food. This is not the decadence or the preciousness we might associate with a word like “foodie,” but a form of reverence . . . Enchanting." —Molly Young, The New York Times Dan Saladino's Eating to Extinction is the prominent broadcaster’s pathbreaking tour of the world’s vanishing foods and his argument for why they matter now more than ever Over the past several decades, globalization has homogenized what we eat, and done so ruthlessly. The numbers are stark: Of the roughly six thousand different plants once consumed by human beings, only nine remain major staples today. Just three of these—rice, wheat, and corn—now provide fifty percent of all our calories. Dig deeper and the trends are more worrisome still: The source of much of the world’s food—seeds—is mostly in the control of just four corporations. Ninety-five percent of milk consumed in the United States comes from a single breed of cow. Half of all the world’s cheese is made with bacteria or enzymes made by one company. And one in four beers drunk around the world is the product of one brewer. If it strikes you that everything is starting to taste the same wherever you are in the world, you’re by no means alone. This matters: when we lose diversity and foods become endangered, we not only risk the loss of traditional foodways, but also of flavors, smells, and textures that may never be experienced again. And the consolidation of our food has other steep costs, including a lack of resilience in the face of climate change, pests, and parasites. Our food monoculture is a threat to our health—and to the planet. In Eating to Extinction, the distinguished BBC food journalist Dan Saladino travels the world to experience and document our most at-risk foods before it’s too late. He tells the fascinating stories of the people who continue to cultivate, forage, hunt, cook, and consume what the rest of us have forgotten or didn’t even know existed. Take honey—not the familiar product sold in plastic bottles, but the wild honey gathered by the Hadza people of East Africa, whose diet consists of eight hundred different plants and animals and who communicate with birds in order to locate bees’ nests. Or consider murnong—once the staple food of Aboriginal Australians, this small root vegetable with the sweet taste of coconut is undergoing a revival after nearly being driven to extinction. And in Sierra Leone, there are just a few surviving stenophylla trees, a plant species now considered crucial to the future of coffee. From an Indigenous American chef refining precolonial recipes to farmers tending Geechee red peas on the Sea Islands of Georgia, the individuals profiled in Eating to Extinction are essential guides to treasured foods that have endured in the face of rampant sameness and standardization. They also provide a roadmap to a food system that is healthier, more robust, and, above all, richer in flavor and meaning.
Categories: Social Science

Efficient Conservation Of Crop Genetic Diversity

Efficient Conservation Of Crop Genetic Diversity

Thirteen maize - breeding countries in the Americas agreed to collaborate in a germplasm project called the Latin American ... a subsidiary project entitled Regenerating Endangered Latin American Maize Germplasm was developed by USA1D ...

Author: Detlef Virchow

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3540000062

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 247

View: 454

The book deals with the economics of conservation of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture in low income countries. This is done by developing concepts and discussing case studies. Only discussing the issues of access to and benefit sharing of plant genetic resources, unfortunately public discussion has neglected the serious problem of financing the conservation efforts because to date the issues of access to and benefit sharing of plant genetic resources have merely been discussed. The global situation of the conserved genetic resources is alarming, mainly due to the fact that the institutes, above all those in developing countries, do not have enough financial resources. Hence, it is imperative that the costs are taken into consideration. The contributions are grouped around theoretical approaches and empirical studies. The estimation of conservation costs help to allocate the appropriate financial assistance to the relevant countries for conserving their natural resources and assist in rationing scarce resources among competing crops which need to be covered under the conservation programmes.
Categories: Business & Economics

CIMMYT in

CIMMYT in

rarchi lers of itional melo from Saving Endangered Maize Collections The effort to save endangered collections of maize landraces in Latin America continued apace in 1993. The CIMMYT maize germplasm bank received back - up samples of ...

Author: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center

Publisher:

ISBN: UTEXAS:059172135787033

Category: Corn

Page:

View: 475

Categories: Corn

The Second Report on the State of the World s Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

The Second Report on the State of the World   s Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

The secondary genepool includes Tripsacum species (~16 species), some of which are endangered. The variability among maize landraces (some 300 have been identified) exceeds that for any other crop.62 Great variation exists for plant ...

Author: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Publisher: Food & Agriculture Org.

ISBN: 9789251065341

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 399

View: 528

Plant genetic resources provide a basis for food security, livelihood support and economic development as a major component of biodiversity. The Second Report on the State of the World’s Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture demonstrates the central role plant genetic diversity continues to play in shaping agriculture growth in the face of climate change and other environmental challenges. It is based on information gathered from Country Reports, regional syntheses, thematic studie s and scientific literature, documenting the major achievements made in this sector during the past decade and identifying the critical gaps and needs that should urgently be addressed. The Report provides the decision-makers with a technical basis for updating the Global Plan of Action on Conservation and Sustainable Use of Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. It also aims to attract the attention of the global community to set priorities for the effective management of plant genet ic resources for the future. Purchase a print copy.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

Integration of Insect Resistant Genetically Modified Crops within IPM Programs

Integration of Insect Resistant Genetically Modified Crops within IPM Programs

(1987) demonstrated how widespread planting of insect-resistant maize, which suppressed early season populations of Helicoverpa ... non-target species, especially those that are threatened or endangered would be particularly serious.

Author: Jörg Romeis

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402083730

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 441

View: 223

Insect pests remain one of the main constraints to food and fiber production worldwide despite farmers deploying a range of techniques to protect their crops. Modern pest control is guided by the principles of integrated pest management (IPM) with pest resistant germplasm being an important part of the foundation. Since 1996, when the first genetically modified (GM) insect-resistant maize variety was commercialized in the USA, the area planted to insect-resistant GM varieties has grown dramatically, representing the fastest adoption rate of any agricultural technology in human history. The goal of our book is to provide an overview on the role insect-resistant GM plants play in different crop systems worldwide. We hope that the book will contribute to a more rational debate about the role GM crops can play in IPM for food and fiber production.
Categories: Technology & Engineering