English Modernism National Identity and the Germans 1890 1950

English Modernism  National Identity and the Germans  1890   1950

This is the first systematic study to trace the way representations of 'Germanness' in modernist British literature from 1890 to 1950 contributed to the development of English identity.

Author: Petra Rau

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317143017

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 480

This is the first systematic study to trace the way representations of 'Germanness' in modernist British literature from 1890 to 1950 contributed to the development of English identity. Petra Rau examines the shift in attitudes towards Germany and Germans, from suspicious competitiveness in the late Victorian period to the aggressive hostility of the First World War and the curious inconsistencies of the 1930s and 1940s. These shifts were no simple response to political change but the result of an anxious negotiation of modernity in which specific aspects of Englishness were projected onto representations of Germans and Germany in English literature and culture. While this incisive argument clarifies and deepens our understanding of cultural and national politics in the first half of the twentieth century, it also complicates current debates surrounding race and 'otherness' in cultural studies. Authors discussed include major figures such as Conrad, Woolf, Lawrence, Ford, Forster and Bowen, as well as popular or less familiar writers such as Saki, Graham Greene, and Stevie Smith. Accessibly written and convincingly argued, Rau's study will not only be an important book for scholars but will serve as a valuable guide to undergraduates working in modernism, literary history, and European cultural relations.
Categories: Literary Criticism

English Modernism National Identity and the Germans 1890 1950

English Modernism  National Identity and the Germans  1890   1950

For the optimistic Ford Madox Ford, the modern metropolis became a medium for assimilation, in which national signifiers ... yields to metropolitan transculturation to the 56 English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950.

Author: Dr Petra Rau

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409475415

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 761

This is the first systematic study to trace the way representations of 'Germanness' in modernist British literature from 1890 to 1950 contributed to the development of English identity. Petra Rau examines the shift in attitudes towards Germany and Germans, from suspicious competitiveness in the late Victorian period to the aggressive hostility of the First World War and the curious inconsistencies of the 1930s and 1940s. These shifts were no simple response to political change but the result of an anxious negotiation of modernity in which specific aspects of Englishness were projected onto representations of Germans and Germany in English literature and culture. While this incisive argument clarifies and deepens our understanding of cultural and national politics in the first half of the twentieth century, it also complicates current debates surrounding race and 'otherness' in cultural studies. Authors discussed include major figures such as Conrad, Woolf, Lawrence, Ford, Forster and Bowen, as well as popular or less familiar writers such as Saki, Graham Greene, and Stevie Smith. Accessibly written and convincingly argued, Rau's study will not only be an important book for scholars but will serve as a valuable guide to undergraduates working in modernism, literary history, and European cultural relations.
Categories: Literary Criticism

An Introduction to Ford Madox Ford

An Introduction to Ford Madox Ford

33 Rau, English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950, p. 92. 34 This, for example, is a topic at the heart of Kazuo Ishiguro's 1989 novel The Remains of the Day, which deals with the idea of Englishness in crisis.

Author: Ashley Chantler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317181774

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 606

For students and readers new to the work of Ford Madox Ford, this volume provides a comprehensive introduction to one of the most complex, important and fascinating authors. Bringing together leading Ford scholars, the volume places Ford's work in the context of significant literary, artistic and historical events and movements. Individual essays consider Ford's theory of literary Impressionism and the impact of the First World War; illuminate The Good Soldier and Parade's End; engage with topics such as the city, gender, national identity and politics; discuss Ford as an autobiographer, poet, propagandist, sociologist, Edwardian and modernist; and show his importance as founding editor of the groundbreaking English Review and transatlantic review. The volume encourages detailed close reading of Ford's writing and illustrates the importance of engaging with secondary sources.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Violence Without God

Violence Without God

In 1916—or any year thereafter—references to German culture in an English text had political significance. In English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950, Petra Rau surveys the frequent use of Germany as a trope in ...

Author: Joyce Wexler

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781501325304

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 841

As twentieth-century writers confronted the political violence of their time, they were overcome by rhetorical despair. Unspeakable acts left writers speechless. They knew that the atrocities of the century had to be recorded, but how? A dead body does not explain itself, and the narrative of the suicide bomber is not the story of the child killed in the blast. In the past, communal beliefs had justified or condemned the most horrific acts, but the late nineteenth-century crisis of belief made it more difficult to come to terms with the meaning of violence. In this major new study, Joyce Wexler argues that this situation produced an aesthetic dilemma that writers solved by inventing new forms. Although Symbolism, Expressionism, Modernism, Magic Realism, and Postmodernism have been criticized for turning away from public events, these forms allowed writers to represent violence without imposing a specific meaning on events or claiming to explain them. Wexler's investigation of the way we think and write about violence takes her across national and period boundaries and into the work of some of the greatest writers of the century, among them Joseph Conrad, T. S. Eliot, D. H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Alfred Döblin, Günter Grass, Gabriel García Márquez, Salman Rushdie, and W. G. Sebald.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Women s Writing Englishness and National and Cultural Identity

Women s Writing  Englishness and National and Cultural Identity

Ranasinha, Ruvani, South Asian Writers in Twentieth-Century Britain: Culture in Translation (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007). Rau, Petra, English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans 18901950 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2009).

Author: Maroula Joannou

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780230285774

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 478

An exciting new mapping of women's writing in the 1940s and 1950s, this book examines Englishness and national identity in women's writing. Taking as a starting point the premise that mobility is a metaphor for the times, this book uses a synthesis of historical retrieval, literary theory and textual analysis to provide culturally situated and historically-specific readings of a wide range of texts addressing issues that relate to the changing experience of women in this time. Themes addressed include the displacements of war, women's radically altered understandings of their own sexuality, the retreat from Empire, the relationship of women to the idea of nation, the migrant experience, the literary representation of Welsh, Scottish and English identity, and the meanings of home. The book includes accessible scholarly commentary on Englishness and gender by women from Scotland, Wales, Ireland the Indian subcontinent and Africa and discusses the work of authors such as Elizabeth Bowen, Virginia Woolf, Dodie Smith, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym, Daphne Du Maurier, Jessie Kesson, Lynette Roberts, Doris Lessing and Muriel Spark.
Categories: Literary Criticism

War Nation and Europe in the Novels of Storm Jameson

War  Nation and Europe in the Novels of Storm Jameson

(2013b), Obscene Modernism: Literary Censorship and Experimentation, 1900–1940, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Rau, Petra. (2009), English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950, Farnham: Ashgate. Reagin, Nancy Ruth.

Author: Katherine Cooper

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350094451

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 251

The novels of Storm Jameson and their depictions of Britain's relationship to Europe around the Second World War represent a crucial departure from the work of her contemporaries. As the first female President of English PEN, Jameson led her country's wartime literary community through turbulent times in history by focusing on European – rather than pointedly British – experiences of war. War, Nation and Europe in the Novels of Storm Jameson is a timely critique situated within the historical and theoretical contexts so fundamental to understanding her work. Presenting previously unpublished archival material that documents her work as an ambassador for British writers during a time of national upheaval, Katherine Cooper reveals how the novelist's pacifism and evolving attitudes to war and peace were underpinned by her overarching vision for the post-war world. Drawing comparisons to the works of Virginia Woolf, Arthur Koestler, Graham Greene and others, this study shows how Jameson's novels gesture towards prevalent internationalist perspectives and reshapes how we view the literary history of the period.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Cities Mountains and Being Modern in fin de si cle England and Germany

Cities  Mountains and Being Modern in fin de si  cle England and Germany

167–83. Rau, Petra (2009) English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950 (Farnham). Readman, Paul (2005) 'The Place of the Past in English Culture, c. 1890–1914', Past and Present 186:1, pp. 147–99.

Author: Ben Anderson

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9781137540003

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 414

This book is the first transnational history of rambling and mountaineering. Focussing on the critical turn-of-the-century era, it offers new insights into alpine development, attitudes to danger, cultures of time, internationalism and domesticity in the outdoors. It charts an emerging group of mass tourist activities, and argues that these thousands of walkers and climbers can only be understood within the context of the urban cultures from which most of them came. In doing so, it offers a fresh perspective on the relationship of alpinists and countryside enthusiasts to the modern world. Instead of an escape from or rejection of modernity, it finds that upland trampers and climbers contested what it meant to be modern, used those modern identities to make political claims on rural space and rural people, and sought to define what a more modern future society should be like.
Categories: History

Katherine Mansfield and World War One

Katherine Mansfield and World War One

Petra Rau, English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950 (Farnham: Ashgate, 2009), p. 68. 24. For a discussion of Saki and Buchan see: 'Flirting with the Beastly Hun: Imperial Anxiety and Modern Militarism in the ...

Author: Gerri Kimber

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748695355

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 700

Examines Katherine Mansfield's engagement with the First World War and its impact on her writingsThis special issue of Katherine Mansfield Studies is in remembrance of the centenary of one of the most significant events of the modernist period. Like the reclamation of women's war writings that we have already seen in relation to Virginia Woolf and others, Mansfield's literary response to the key political event of her time is fundamental to our understanding of her developing writerly style. It is in her responses to the war that we find a 'political Mansfield', and the articles in this volume provide us with a greater appreciation of Mansfield in her socio-historical context. In offering new readings of Mansfield's explicit and implicit war stories, the contributions to this volume refine and extend our knowledge of particular stories and their genealogy. They illuminate the specific and more general influences of the war on Mansfield's evolving technique and, jointly, they reveal the importance of the war on her literary language, as well as for her own particular brand of modernism. This volume helps develop our ideas of what constitute war writings and, in so doing, expands the scope of Mansfield scholarship and the field of First World War studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Handbook of British Literature and Culture of the First World War

Handbook of British Literature and Culture of the First World War

Veteran Poetics: British Literature in the Age of Mass Warfare, 1790–2015. ... Virginia Woolf, Jane Ellen Harrison, and the Spirit of Modernist Classicism. ... English Modernism, National Identity and the Germans, 18901950.

Author: Ralf Schneider

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110422467

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 540

View: 99

The First World War has given rise to a multifaceted cultural production like no other historical event. This handbook surveys British literature and film about the war from 1914 until today. The continuing interest in World War I highlights the interdependence of war experience, the imaginative re-creation of that experience in writing, and individual as well as collective memory. In the first part of the handbook, the major genres of war writing and film are addressed, including of course poetry and the novel, but also the short story; furthermore, it is shown how our conception of the Great War is broadened when looked at from the perspective of gender studies and post-colonial criticism. The chapters in the second part present close readings of important contributions to the literary and filmic representation of World War I in Great Britain. All in all, the contributions demonstrate how the opposing forces of focusing and canon-formation on the one hand, and broadening and revision of the canon on the other, have characterised British literature and culture of the First World War.
Categories: Literary Criticism