Dina or Familiar faces by W P Wilkie

Dina  or Familiar faces  by W P  Wilkie

The rain clouds had cut short the twilight , and Edith , who sat facing the window , began to experience those vague apprehensions — that feeling of insecurity to which timid persons are subject when night looks in upon them through an ...

Author: William Patrick Wilkie

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:600057800

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Page:

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Private Faces and Public Places

Private Faces and Public Places

I liked the new flat in Notting Hill Gate, the front room with its big ground-floor window overlooking Ladbroke Square, but I was glad that I was working non-stop. O'Toole was having an enormous success in The Long and the Short and the ...

Author: Sian Phillips

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781529373646

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 592

View: 926

'Modern classics: elegantly written and breathtaking in their honesty' Daily Express Siân Phillips has a long and celebrated career on both stage and screen. For the first time, her two bestselling volumes of memoir Private Faces and Public Places will be available as a single volume with a brand new foreword by the author. With wonderful stories and unflinching candour, Private Faces and Public Places covers her life from its beginnings in the remote Welsh countryside, where life hadn't changed for centuries, to finding herself at the epicentre of the acting world at its most glamorous alongside husband Peter O'Toole, whose career was about to take off with the spellbinding Lawrence of Arabia. Siân describes the mad and wonderfully impulsive times with O'Toole alongside the tempestuous, insecure, and often lonely periods in their marriage. Incredibly, it endures over 20 years. When it ends, surprising even herself, she plunges straight into another marriage, with the much younger actor Robin Sachs. Emerging alone from her second marriage, triumphant and unrepentant, the story Siân tells ranks alongside the very best in show business.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Faces in the Moon

Faces in the Moon

Lucie sat down on the step , cupped her face in her hands , and fell asleep . The first night on the farm was passed in restless journeys to and from the bedroom window . She heard Uncle Jerry in the parlor talking to his radio and ...

Author: Betty Louise Bell

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806127740

Category: Fiction

Page: 193

View: 544

Faces in the Moon is the story of three generations of Cherokee women, as viewed by the youngest, Lucie, a woman who has been able to use education and her imagination to escape the confines of her rootless, impoverished upbringing. When her mother’s illness summons her back to Oklahoma, Lucie finds herself confronted with the legacy of a childhood she has worked hard to separate from her adult self. Her mother, Gracie, and her maternal aunt, Auney, are members of the Cherokees’ "lost generation," women who rejected the traditional rural ways in search of a more glamorous life as autonomous working women.
Categories: Fiction

Faces In The Water

Faces In The Water

I waved asmall green flag inthe face oftheoncoming hoursandthey passed through thescarred countryside to theirdestination andasthe faces peered from the window atme I sawthey werethe faces ofthe people awaiting shocktreatment.

Author: Janet Frame

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780349006734

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 438

'Janet Frame's luminous words are the more precious because they were snatched from the jaws of the disaster of her early life . . . and yet to read her is no more difficult than breathing' Hilary Mantel When Janet Frame's doctor suggested that she write about her traumatic experiences in mental institutions in order to free herself from them, the result was Faces in the Water, a powerful and poignant novel. Istina Mavet descends through increasingly desolate wards, with the threat of leucotomy ever present. As she observes her fellow patients, long dismissed by hospital staff, with humour and compassion, she reveals her original and questing mind. This riveting novel became an international classic, translated into nine languages, and has also been used as a medical school text. Books included in the VMC 40th anniversary series include: Frost in May by Antonia White; The Collected Stories of Grace Paley; Fire from Heaven by Mary Renault; The Magic Toyshop by Angela Carter; The Weather in the Streets by Rosamond Lehmann; Deep Water by Patricia Highsmith; The Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West; Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston; Heartburn by Nora Ephron; The Dud Avocado by Elaine Dundy; Memento Mori by Muriel Spark; A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor; and Faces in the Water by Janet Frame
Categories: Fiction

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office

In a reversible window , the combination with the sliding stiles cooperating cam - surfaces on said meeting faces , substantially as and confined in grooves in the window - frame , and the window - sash , of for the purpose set forth ...

Author: United States. Patent Office

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89048454615

Category: Patents

Page:

View: 353

Categories: Patents

Faces in the Shadows

Faces in the Shadows

Exiting at the back door, I turned to see her blurred, shadowy face in the window just before me and then the flat of her hand as she gave a quick wave. I returned the wave and watched as the bus pulled away.

Author: Gregory El Harvey

Publisher: C. Harvey Publications

ISBN: 9781461019152

Category: Fiction

Page: 210

View: 603

Artist, photographer, and editor Stanly Le Haley faces the onslaught of multiple sclerosis and subsequent legal blindness. He has been image oriented all his life, but now realizes he will never again see anyone or anything clearly. As the disease progresses he lives in expectation of complete vision loss. But the three women he encounters – his neurologist, a professional colleague, and a public school teacher – discover that his scars run deeper than the optic nerves. Each in turn attempts to woo him from his lifelong guilt over simply being part of the human race.
Categories: Fiction

Faces

Faces

But the course and size of the moon changed until the face disappeared back into the pane of glass. Velma baked strawberry pie, ... Dutifully, they stood and waited for Jesus in the window, but he'd stopped coming. Velma didn't care.

Author: Leigh Kennedy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780575117167

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 981

It is hard to say how it started - all the unexplained little signs of a new baby about the house in 'The Silent Cradle' - but soon none of the O'Bannons could deny that there had been a highly irregular addition to the family. In 'Max Haunting' a middle-aged hippie, preserved almost intact from the Sixties, starts showing up on the doorsteps of his old friends and loves who, in acquiring jobs and furniture, have 'sold out' rather less than he thought. Hauntings of curious varieties continue in other stories: the sort manufactured out of glass by a man who thinks his godly wife deserves a miracle; the visitation of a mother's cruelty into the mind of her daughter as she confronts the frustrations of coping with her own child; the specters of opportunities lost or spurned which nag to be laid, like ghosts. Elsewhere Leigh Kennedy considers the impulse of cannibalism in a future world whose greed has induced ecological upheaval, and the phenomenon of speaking in tongues as investigated by a sociology professor. She views the world through the eyes of a victim of seizures and of a primatologist whose devotion to apes has gone a bit too far.
Categories: Fiction

Faces At the Office

Faces At the Office

Though the view outdoors had begun to fade due to the developing intensity of the lamp light inside. And their window soon became black. Brian carefully leaned toward Ella, a small ironic grin playing on his face.

Author: Paul Quintanilla

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 9781329466531

Category: Fiction

Page: 421

View: 973

Most novelists consider the daily routine of a menial job in an office to be too dull and uninteresting to merit the treatment of a full length novel. How can such an unchanging dull monotony hold the reader's attention, they may ask? Though the clashes of the titans at the top have been fully explored often enough. The daily experience, though, of being at work in an office is one of the most common experiences of everyday life. And for that reason merits our attention. What's more, these basic realities should be more openly dealt with. This is a novel about the simple daily experience of being on the job. Of going to work everyday. A drama which is large enough on its own.
Categories: Fiction

Eight Faces at Three

Eight Faces at Three

But I saw her sitting up in front of her window—” His voice broke suddenly and trailed away. “Exactly,” said Malone. “She was sitting up in front of the window when you found her dead, four hours later.” Again everyone started to speak ...

Author: Craig Rice

Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd

ISBN: 9781789540000

Category: Fiction

Page: 159

View: 417

John J. Malone, defender of the guilty, is notorious for getting his culpable clients off. It's the innocent ones who are problems. Like Holly Inglehart, accused of piercing the black heart of her well-heeled and tyrannical aunt Alexandria with a lovely Florentine paper cutter. No one who knew the old battle-ax liked her, but Holly's prints were found on the murder weapon. Plus, she had a motive: She was about to be disinherited for marrying a common bandleader. With each new lurid headline, Holly's friends and supporters start to rally. There's North Shore debutante Helene Brand; Holly's groom's press agent, Jake Justus; the madam of a local brothel, and Alexandria's hand-wringing servants. But not one of them can explain the queerest bent to the crime: At the time of the murder, every clock in the Inglehart mansion stopped dead. And that's only the first twist in a baffling case of "aunty-cide"—because Alexandria won't be the last to die. Making his debut in this fun and funny novel, Craig Rice's one-of-a-kind Chicago attorney is "an inspired creation . . . an unapologetic champion of the defense bar . . . a defender of the guilty whose contempt for society outstrips his contempt for criminals" (Jon L. Breen, Edgar Award–winning author). Eight Faces at Three is the 1st book in the John J. Malone Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.
Categories: Fiction

Faces on the Clock

Faces on the Clock

the door would open, Pat would walk in, still with a smile on his face, and return to his seat. ... Finally, Mr. Wolff went to the window, looked out and yelled, “Hey, you guys, what do you think you're doing?” We all got up and ran to ...

Author: Larry Bauer-Scandin

Publisher: Eagle Entertainment USA

ISBN: 9780615375168

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 278

View: 314

This guy is tough, and so is his message. (By Ruben Rosario, Pioneer Press, St. Paul, MN August 2011. Edited for length) Like the U.S. Postal Service, apparently nothing keeps Larry Bauer-Scandin - foster dad to 125 - from his self-appointed rounds. Not the weather. Not the heart ailments or the genetic neurological disorder that robbed him of movement and rendered him legally blind. The 64-year-old Vadnais Heights resident just gets up and does it. "My life was normal for the first nine years of my life until 1957 when my foot went to sleep, except that my foot never woke up," Bauer-Scandin told a group of inmates from the 3100 unit at the Dakota County Jail. But that's not the main message that Bauer-Scandin, a retired probation officer and jail counselor, wants to deliver on this day. "Whom do you blame for your problems?" he asks the group of 34 men, who are members of IMC, or Inmates Motivated to Change. Under the program, inmates with chemical dependency or mostly nonviolent offenses sign an agreement to take part in several programs and pledge not to make the same mistakes that keep landing them in lock-up. "What people need to do is stand in front of a mirror and ask: 'How much of the problem is mine and how much is it somebody else?' " I first wrote about Bauer-Scandin five years ago. It was centered on his life as a foster parent. As he told the inmates, two of his former foster kids are cops, one in St. Paul. Two are soldiers deployed to Iraq. One's a millionaire. One's an author. Most are raising families or staying out of trouble in spite of hardships. But "15 are dead," said Bauer-Scandin, author of "Faces on the Clock," an engrossing memoir about his life. The dead include suicide victims, including an 11-year-old, others from AIDS and "my last one, they found in three or four pieces, as I understand." Bauer-Scandin's worth writing about again for what he continues to do at great pain and sacrifice without pay or fanfare. He didn't sugarcoat or pull punches with his audience. "What I'm afraid is still happening is that the system is trying to figure out how to get tighter," he told them. "The sentences are getting tougher." And it's not the police, the sheriffs, the courts or even the folks in state and county-run corrections that are responsible for the race to incarcerate. "It's the legislature," Bauer-Scandin said. "And legislatures have been known to do very stupid things." He also faults the media and a gullible public that forms opinions and dehumanizes people strictly on what they watch on TV and not on real-life experiences or knowledge. "What do they see?" he said. "They see the Charlie Mansons. They see the unusual. They see the extreme. Most of you aren't that way. But that's what makes the news." Yet he doesn't divert from his main message: It's up to the inmate to take a positive step and choose the right way. "Get yourself back into a position where you can influence those people, to be able to go to a school board or a city council or legislative meeting and have your voice heard. "You can't fight the system from in here," he concluded. "You have to be out there." The inmates applauded and, one by one, stood in line to shake his hand on his way out the jail complex. His progressively debilitating disorder is taking more of a toll these days. But he steered the scooter inside the van and deftly wiggled his frail body into the driver's seat. He has no complaints, he told me. He will continue to go out and speak as long as God and his wife allow him. "I hope something stuck," he tells me before he drives off. I hope so too, Larry.
Categories: Family & Relationships