Ethiopia and the Bible

Ethiopia and the Bible

A good deal of legendary information about the Falashas appears already in such medieval writings as Sefer Eldad and in an ... June 1957 ; Aescoly , Sefer ha - Falashim ; idem , Recueil de Textes Falachas ; Leslau , Falasha Anthology ...

Author: Edward Ullendorff

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0197260764

Category: Religion

Page: 173

View: 494

Traditionally Ethiopia has formed a bridge between civilizations, with Jerusalem as vital as Aksum in the national consciousness of the Ethiopians. In this volume, Professor Ullendorff investigates the relationship of Ethiopia to the Bible. He considers the historical background, translations of the Bible into Ethiopian languages, and the impact of the Old Testament, which goes beyond anything experienced in the other Oriental Christian Churches. The book concludes with an examination of the story of the Queen of Sheba, based on the Biblical account of the queen's visit to King Solomon. It shows how this account has undergone extensive Arabian, Ethiopian, Jewish and other elaborations, to become the subject of one of the most ubiquitous and fertile cycles of legends in the Near East.
Categories: Religion

Falasha Anthology

Falasha Anthology

This book offers a cross section of their sacred literature, translated for the first time into English from Ethiopic sources.

Author: Wolf Leslau

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105007595684

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 543

"The Falashas, who are the most isolated and most ancient Jewish community extant, have preserved their own religious writings through the centuries. This book offers a cross section of their sacred literature, translated for the first time into English from Ethiopic sources. In addition, the translator provides a detailed description of the life and mores of the Falashas, based on his personal experience and observation during a prolonged stay in their community"--Back cover.
Categories: Religion

The Beta Israel Falasha in Ethiopia

The Beta Israel  Falasha  in Ethiopia

It is strange to find Kessler, Falashas, 42, quoting this passage with approval given his claim that Elephantine practice was “remarkably reminiscent” of that of the Beta Israel. Wolf Leslau, Falasha Anthology (New Haven: Yale ...

Author: Steven Kaplan

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814746640

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 395

...balanced and well informed...a striking piece of scholarship aimed at demythologizing the origins of the Ethiopian Falasha. -Foreign Affairs Kaplan's definitive treatment will be of interest to students and scholars of Jewish history, African history, and comparative religion, as well as anyone interested in Jewish affairs and the modern Middle East. The Midwest Book Review Kaplan's conceptualizations are judicious and clearly expressed...incisive and well documented... and provides essential background for the process of assimilation now taking lace in Israel. -The International Journal of African Historical Studies Kaplan's able interdisciplinary approach is of great value for persons interested in religion, civilization, and process of change. -Religious Studies Review Kaplan's well-written, lucid presentation make[s] this important, competent contribution accessible to all levels of readers. Highly recommended. Choice Insightful and thorough, a welcome contribution.Kay Kaufman Shelemay, Professor of Music, Harvard University Undoubtedly the most detailed, most scholarly, and most dispassionate argument of Falasha history hitherto published. [T]his work deserves ... the most careful study by all those (and in particular in Israel) who have any practical or scholarly connection with the Beta Israel. -- Edward UllendorffEmeritus Professor of Ethiopian Studies, University of LondonFellow of the British Academy Given Kaplan's facility with both written and oral sources, he is in a unique position to synthesize and reconcile the new historical findings of ethnographers with the written sources and differing conclusions of earlier historians and linguists. His work is insightful and thorough, a welcome contribution. -- Kay Shelemay, Wesleyan University The origin of the Black Jews of Ethiopia has long been a source of fascination and controversy. Their condition and future continues to generate debate. The culmination of almost a decade of research, The Beta Israel (Falasha) in Ethiopia marks the publication of the first book-length scholarly study of the history of this unique community. In this volume, Steven Kaplan seeks to demythologize the history of the Falasha and to consider them in the wider context of Ethiopian history and culture. This marks a clear departure from previous studies which have viewed them from the external perspective of Jewish history. Drawing on a wide variety of sources including the Beta Israel's own literature and oral traditions, Kaplan demonstrates that they are not a lost Jewish tribe, but rather an ethnic group which emerged in Ethiopia between the 14th and 16th century. Indeed, the name, Falasha, their religious hierarchy, sacred texts, and economic specialization can all be dated to this period. Among the subjects the book addresses are their links with Ethiopian Christianity, the medieval legends concerning their existence, their wars with the Ethiopian emperors, their relegation to the status of a despised semi-caste, their encounters with European missionaries, and the impact of the Great Famine of 1888-1892. Kaplan's definitive treatment will be of interest to students and scholars of Jewish history, African history, and comparative religion, as well as anyone interested in Jewish affairs and the modern Middle East.
Categories: History

Falasha Anthology

Falasha Anthology

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:152541016

Category: Ethiopic literature

Page: 222

View: 392

Categories: Ethiopic literature

For Our Soul

For Our Soul

See Ullendorff , The Ethiopians ; Wolf Leslau , Falasha Anthology ( New Haven and London : Yale University Press , 1951 ) ; David Kessler , The Falashas : The Forgotten Jews of Ethiopia ( London : George Allen & Unwin , 1982 ) ; Robert ...

Author: Teshome G. Wagaw

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814324584

Category: Social Science

Page: 293

View: 146

Between 1977 and 1992, practically all Ethiopian Jews migrated to Israel. This mass move followed the 1974 revolution in Ethiopia and its ensuing economic and political upheavals, compounded by the brutality of the military regime and the willingness - after years of refusal - of the Israeli government to receive them as bona fide Jews entitled to immigrate to that country. Based on fieldwork conducted over several years, For Our Soul describes the ongoing process of adjustment and absorption that the Ethiopian Jewish immigrants, also known as Falasha or Beta Israel, have experienced in Israel. As the sole black Jewish community from sub-Sahara Africa in Israel, the Ethiopian Jews have met with unique difficulties. Teshome Wagaw examines the problems between the Falasha and Israeli Jews that have resulted from dissimilarities in language, culture, religious practices, education, technology, race, and class. Further, he considers the various conflicts that have arisen in villages, schools, and workplaces as the immigrants have interacted with the larger community. In these contexts, Wagaw analyzes the issues of modernity, work skills and habits, family formation, and methods of presenting self. To further clarify the concerns that have developed among both the immigrants and the Israeli society, the author addresses the history of the Falasha; their religious and occupational practices in Ethiopia; their social, occupational, and religious status in Ethiopia; and the adversity they experienced as they navigated from their homeland to Israel. He also provides a brief but insightful analysis of the history of Israel prior to and since statehood.
Categories: Social Science

Testament of Abraham

Testament of Abraham

So Leslau, Falasha Anthology, 94–95 (“almost certainly”). * Aescoly, Recueil de textes falachas, 66–75. There is a second French translation by Marius Chaine and André Caquot in Delcor, Testament, 221–24. Conti Rossini, “Nuovi appunti ...

Author: Dale C. Allison

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110923971

Category: Religion

Page: 543

View: 219

This first verse-by-verse commentary on the Greek text of the Testament of Abraham places the work within the history of both Jewish and Christian literature. It emphasizes the literary artistry and comedic nature of the Testament, brings to the task of interpretation a mass of comparative material, and establishes that, although the Testament goes back to a Jewish tale of the first or second century CE, the Christian elements are much more extensive than has previously been realized. The commentary further highlights the dependence of the Testament upon both Greco-Roman mythology and the Jewish Bible. This should be the standard commentary for years to come.
Categories: Religion