Farewell to Innocence

Farewell to Innocence

Until now, the Christian church had chosen to move through history with a bland kind of innocence, hiding the painful truths of oppression behind a facade of myths and real or imagined anxieties. This is no longer possible.

Author: Allan Aubrey Boesak

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725235694

Category: Religion

Page: 198

View: 638

While we acknowledge that all expressions of liberation theology are not identical, we must protest very strongly against the false divisions that some make: between black theology in South Africa and black theology in the United States, between black theology and African theology, and between black theology and Latin American liberation theology. But moving away from the illusioned universality of western theology to the contextuality of liberation theology is a risky business; one that cannot be done innocently. In the search for theological and human authenticity in its own situation, black theology does not stand alone. It is but one expression of this search going on within many different contexts. Until now, the Christian church had chosen to move through history with a bland kind of innocence, hiding the painful truths of oppression behind a facade of myths and real or imagined anxieties. This is no longer possible. The oppressed who believe in God, the Father of Jesus Christ, no longer want to believe in the myths created to subjugate them. It is no longer possible to innocently accept history "as it happens," silently hoping that God would take the responsibility for human failure. The theology of liberation spells out this realization. For the Christian church it constitutes, in no uncertain terms, farewell to innocence.
Categories: Religion

Farewell Innocence

Farewell Innocence

Farewell Innocence takes you into every department of the foundry. We see the crusher crushing silica bricks to be milled in the compo shed for making cores in the core shop. We visit the smithy and the fitting shop and the canteen.

Author: William Glynne-Jones

Publisher: Parthian Books

ISBN: 9781910901632

Category: Fiction

Page: 250

View: 521

"A world of green: a new and weird world of grim, dark shadows and frenzied activity; of conflicting sounds varying from the roar and thunder of overhead gantries, the sharp, shrill staccato beat of automatic hammers, to the echoing ring of steel upon steel, and the hollow wheezing and thumping of the hydraulic moulding machines." Starting as an apprentice at Bevan's foundry, Ieuan Morgan enters a new and testing world. His colleagues soon turn out to be his tormentors while life at home is not without its challenges. It is hard for the young man to sustain his dreams of one day being a writer, and of a better world. Things have to get worse before getting better so unemployment casts its long shadow over the town. But the lay-offs give the gifted Ieuan time to read and think and on a visit to the fair to meet Sally, a gentle, consumptive young woman from the wrong side of the tracks. With this, his destiny changes course. Written with a deep authenticity born from bitter experience, William Glynne-Jones depicts life in the fictional town of Abermor and especially the daily grind of foundry life, in a workplace fraught with dangers. Farewell Innocence is a heartfelt and affecting account of a young man's rites of passage in hard times.
Categories: Fiction

Farewell to Innocence

Farewell to Innocence

Author: Allan Aubrey Boesak

Publisher:

ISBN: 9024200474

Category: Black power

Page: 140

View: 299

Categories: Black power

Farewell to Innocence

Farewell to Innocence

Author: Allan A. Boesak

Publisher:

ISBN: 0783755236

Category: Black power

Page: 197

View: 469

Categories: Black power

Farewell to Innocence

Farewell to Innocence

Author: Allan Boesak

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015004872332

Category: Black power

Page: 156

View: 790

Categories: Black power

Confessional Theology

Confessional Theology

... was to bid farewell to a pseudo-innocence125 which tempted one to close one's eyes and ears to what one had seen and heard. Barth deals extensively with this pseudo-innocence when he insists that it is not necessary and possible to ...

Author: Rothney S. Tshaka

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443822138

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 750

Christian confessions are usually seen as statements of faith which has no relationship with politics. The result is a tendency to view these documents as theological but not political. This study discusses this misconception but adds that although these documents are not to be perceived as political per se, that they can nonetheless not ignore the political contexts from which they emerge. Two confesional documents are discussed to illustrate the point, viz the Barmen Theological Declaration (1934) in Nazi-Germany as well as the Belhar Confession (1986) during apartheid South Africa. The findings of the study is that the theology of Karl Barth and therefore the Belhar Confession establishes and unavoidable link between christian confessions and politics. The word ‘confession’ is used here in relation to Barth’s interpretation of our responsibility to speak about God because of the fact that we are christian and also our inability to speak about God as if God is known in God’s entirety to us. Seen in this way, confesional theology is opposed to tendencies that gives the impresion that we are able to speak about God as if we know Him in His entirety. Five characteristics in the theology of Barth are investigaed. These characteristics illustrate the degree to which theology is related to politics. It also point to the fact that politics was never a marginal factor in the theological reflections of Barth. The study suggests that the theology of Barth remains relevant because it interprets the Word in a manner that does not ignore the contexts in which this interpretation of the Word takes place. The study furthermore suggests that the entire theology of Barth can be construed as confessional theology. It arrives at this end and makes very clear that confessional theology differs fundamentally from ‘confessonalism,’ but that confessional theology always calls for those who espouse it to embody that which is confessed. To uphold the characteristics of confessional theology in the theology of Barth, it is agreed that his theology continued to play significant roles in different theological contexts. It is because of this view that it is argued that the theology of Barth had a great influence on the Belhar Confession. The debate around the Belhar Confession brings further important questions about the theological situation in South Africa today. In the end it is suggested that confessional theology is a significant theological method which can safeguard theology from the claws of ‘theologised politics.’ Confessional theology can thus make a significant contribution to the current theological debates in democratic South Africa.
Categories: Religion

Globalisation Volume 1

Globalisation Volume 1

4. farewell to innocenceFarewell to Innocence”28 is the title of the dissertation I wrote in 1976 . It was meant then to help black and white people in South Africa to understand what it meant to live in a world forged by our ...

Author: Allan Aubrey Boesak

Publisher: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA

ISBN: 9781920338039

Category: Religion

Page: 184

View: 641

Since the adoption of the Accra Declaration by the World Alliance of Reformed Churches in Accra, Ghana, 2004 churches in the Reformed communion all over the world have been confronted with some of the most burning issues of our day: globalisation in the myriad life-changing ways it impacts on the world and the lives of ordinary people in communities everywhere.
Categories: Religion

Freedom s Distant Shores

Freedom s Distant Shores

Desmond Tutu, “The South African Struggle,” an unpublished speech, delivered at the Partners in Ecumenism Conference of the National Council of Churches, Washington, D.C. (September 26, 1984), 1; Allan A. Boesak, Farewell to Innocence: ...

Author: R. Drew Smith

Publisher: Baylor University Press

ISBN: 9781932792379

Category: Religion

Page: 294

View: 207

This volume examines relations between U.S. Protestants and Africa since the end of colonial rule. It draws attention to shifting ecclesiastical and socio-political priorities, especially the decreased momentum of social justice advocacy and the growing missionary influence of churches emphasizing spiritual revival and personal prosperity. The book provides a thought-provoking assessment of U.S. Protestant involvements with Africa, and it proposes forms of engagement that build upon ecclesiastical dynamism within American and African contexts.
Categories: Religion

The Oxford Handbook of the New Cultural History of Music

The Oxford Handbook of the New Cultural History of Music

Moreover, it seems clear from Mahler's contemporary comments that the melody and orchestration of this farewell to innocence were composed, at least in his mind, before he suddenly remembered the text that seemed to fit them so ...

Author: Jane F. Fulcher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199354092

Category: History

Page: 605

View: 563

This volume demonstrates a new approach to cultural history, as it now being practiced by both historians and musicologists, and the field's quest to grasp the realms of human experience, understanding, communication and meaning through the study of music and of musical practices. The contributors employ a resonant new methodological synthesis which combines the theoretical perspectives drawn from the "new cultural history" and "new musicology" of the 1980s with recent social, sociological, and anthropological theories.
Categories: History

The Rise and Demise of Black Theology

The Rise and Demise of Black Theology

Boesak's most important book, Farewell to Innocence: a socio-ethical study on Black Theology and Black Power, was originally published in 1976. It was dedicated 'in memory of Steve Biko with respect' and is indebted to black ...

Author: Alistair Kee

Publisher: SCM Press

ISBN: 9780334041641

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 445

Black Theology emerged in the 1960s as a response to black consciousness. In South Africa, it is a critique of power; in the UK it is a political theology of black culture. The dominant form of Black Theology has been in the USA, originally influenced by Black Power and the critique of white racism. Since then, it claims to have broadened its perspective to include oppression on the grounds of race, gender and class. In this book, Alistair Kee contests this claim, arguing that Black and Womanist Theologies present inadequate analysis of race and gender and no account at all of class or economic oppression.With a few notable exceptions, Black Theology in the USA repeats the mantras of the 1970s, the discourse of modernity. Content with American capitalism, it fails to address the source of the impoverishment of black Americans at home. Content with a romantic image of Africa, this 'African-American' movement fails to defend contemporary Africa against predatory American global ambitions. Blacks in the West, Kee claims here, are no longer the victims; they are the voters and consumers who should be able to influence western governments - the American government in particular - into changing policies towards Africa in particular and the third world in general. This book does not argue that Black theologians should give up, but that they should move on, for the sake of the black poor in America, the black poor in Africa and the third world. The failure of Black theologians to do so is a cause for concern beyond the circle of practitioners of Black theology.
Categories: Religion