Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy

Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy

“The Imaginary Piazza: Tommaso Garzoni and the Late Italian Renaissance.” In Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Memory of David Herlihy, edited by Samuel K. Cohn and Steven epstein, 439–54. Ann Arbor: University of ...

Author: Deborah L Krohn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317134565

Category: Art

Page: 284

View: 205

Though Bartolomeo Scappi's Opera (1570), the first illustrated cookbook, is well known to historians of food, up to now there has been no study of its illustrations, unique in printed books through the early seventeenth century. In Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy, Krohn both treats the illustrations in Scappi's cookbook as visual evidence for a lost material reality; and through the illustrations, including several newly-discovered hand-colored examples, connects Scappi's Opera with other types of late Renaissance illustrated books. What emerges from both of these approaches is a new way of thinking about the place of cookbooks in the history of knowledge. Krohn argues that with the increasing professionalization of many skills and trades, Scappi was at the vanguard of a new way of looking not just at the kitchen-as workshop or laboratory-but at the ways in which artisanal knowledge was visualized and disseminated by a range of craftsmen, from engineers to architects. The recipes in Scappi's Opera belong on the one hand to a genre of cookery books, household manuals, and courtesy books that was well established by the middle of the sixteenth century, but the illustrations suggest connections to an entirely different and emergent world of knowledge. It is through study of the illustrations that these connections are discerned, explained, and interpreted. As one of the most important cookbooks for early modern Europe, the time is ripe for a focused study of Scappi's Opera in the various contexts in which Krohn frames it: book history, antiquarianism, and visual studies.
Categories: Art

Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy

Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy

In Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy, Krohn both treats the illustrations in Scappi's cookbook as visual evidence for a lost material reality; and through the illustrations, including several newly-discovered hand-colored examples, ...

Author: Deborah L Krohn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317134558

Category: Art

Page: 284

View: 612

Though Bartolomeo Scappi's Opera (1570), the first illustrated cookbook, is well known to historians of food, up to now there has been no study of its illustrations, unique in printed books through the early seventeenth century. In Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy, Krohn both treats the illustrations in Scappi's cookbook as visual evidence for a lost material reality; and through the illustrations, including several newly-discovered hand-colored examples, connects Scappi's Opera with other types of late Renaissance illustrated books. What emerges from both of these approaches is a new way of thinking about the place of cookbooks in the history of knowledge. Krohn argues that with the increasing professionalization of many skills and trades, Scappi was at the vanguard of a new way of looking not just at the kitchen-as workshop or laboratory-but at the ways in which artisanal knowledge was visualized and disseminated by a range of craftsmen, from engineers to architects. The recipes in Scappi's Opera belong on the one hand to a genre of cookery books, household manuals, and courtesy books that was well established by the middle of the sixteenth century, but the illustrations suggest connections to an entirely different and emergent world of knowledge. It is through study of the illustrations that these connections are discerned, explained, and interpreted. As one of the most important cookbooks for early modern Europe, the time is ripe for a focused study of Scappi's Opera in the various contexts in which Krohn frames it: book history, antiquarianism, and visual studies.
Categories: Art

Food and Women in Italian Literature Culture and Society

Food and Women in Italian Literature  Culture and Society

In Italy in particular, this shift is only notable in the late nineteenth century, following unification, as witnessed in ... Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens (New York: Routledge, 2017).

Author: Claudia Bernardi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350137790

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 318

This book explores how women's relationship with food has been represented in Italian literature, cinema, scientific writings and other forms of cultural expression from the 19th century to the present. Italian women have often been portrayed cooking and serving meals to others, while denying themselves the pleasure of the table. The collection presents a comprehensive understanding of the symbolic meanings associated with food and of the way these intersect with Italian women's socio-cultural history and the feminist movement. From case studies on Sophia Loren and Elena Ferrante, to analyses of cookbooks by Italian chefs, each chapter examines the unique contribution Italian culture has made to perceiving and portraying women in a specific relation to food, addressing issues of gender, identity and politics of the body.
Categories: Social Science

The World of Renaissance Italy A Daily Life Encyclopedia 2 volumes

The World of Renaissance Italy  A Daily Life Encyclopedia  2 volumes

Cooking and Eating; Politics and Warfare: Arms and Armor; Science and Technology: Academies; Agriculture and Agronomy; Alchemy; Astronomy before Copernicus ... Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens.

Author: Joseph P. Byrne

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440829604

Category: History

Page: 797

View: 322

Students of the Italian Renaissance who wish to go beyond the standard names and subjects will find in this text abundant information on the lives, customs, beliefs, and practices of those who lived during this exciting time period. • Synthesizes the latest research and publication in the Italian Renaissance era by the top scholars in their respective historical fields • Covers a range of types of people and issues rarely covered in other books on the Italian Renaissance and supplies detailed coverage that adds a social dimension to traditional topics such as art, religion, and war • Authored by a prolific and highly regarded author of history texts, Joseph P. Byrne, PhD, who is expert in the Italian Renaissance • Appropriate for advanced high school and undergraduate college students as well as general readers interested in the Renaissance period in Italy
Categories: History

Text Food and the Early Modern Reader

Text  Food and the Early Modern Reader

A version of this article has appeared in Deborah L. Krohn, Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens (London: Routledge, 2016). 3 Michel de Certeau, The Practice of Everyday Life, trans.

Author: Jason Scott-Warren

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317045724

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 400

In early modern culture, eating and reading were entangled acts. Our dead metaphors (swallowed stories, overcooked narratives, digested information) are all that now remains of a rich interplay between text and food, in which every element of dining, from preparation to purgation, had its equivalent in the literary sphere. Following the advice of the poet George Herbert, this essay collection "looks to the mouth", unfolding the charged relationship between ingestion and expression in a wide variety of texts and contexts. With contributions from leading scholars in the field, Text, Food and the Early Modern Reader: Eating Words fills a significant gap in our understanding of early modern cultural history. Situated at the lively intersection between literary, historical and bibliographical studies, it opens new lines of dialogue between the study of material textuality and the history of the body.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food

The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Food

Savoring Power, Consuming the Times: The Metaphors of Food in Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. ... Krohn, Deborah L. Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo 264 selected guide to further reading.

Author: J. Michelle Coghlan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108427364

Category: Cooking

Page: 320

View: 998

This Companion rethinks food in literature from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to contemporary food blogs, and recovers cookbooks as literary texts.
Categories: Cooking

Food Hawkers

Food Hawkers

She is the author of articles on Italian Renaissance art and patronage, the history of collecting, and culinary history, and a book, Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens (Ashgate, 2015).

Author: Melissa Calaresu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317134343

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 276

Street vendors are ubiquitous across the world and throughout history. They are part of almost any distribution chain, and play an important role in the marketing of consumer goods particularly to poorer customers. Focusing on the food trades, this multi-disciplinary volume explores the dynamics of street selling and its impact on society. Through an investigation of food hawking, the volume both showcases the latest results from a subject that has seen the emergence of a significant body of innovative and adventurous scholarship, and advances the understanding of street vending and its impact on society by stimulating interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary discussions. Covering a time span of approximately two millennia, from antiquity to the present, the book includes chapters on Europe and Asia, and covers a diverse range of themes such as the identity of food sellers (in terms of gender, ethnicity, and social status); the role of the street seller in the distribution of food; the marketing of food; food traders and the establishment; the representation of food hawkers; and street traders and economic development. By taking a dynamic approach, the collection has enabled its contributors to cross disciplinary boundaries and engage in discussions which extend beyond the limits of their own academic fields, and thus provide a fresh appreciation of this ancient phenomenon.
Categories: History

The Hungry Eye

The Hungry Eye

Eating, Drinking, and European Culture from Rome to the Renaissance Leonard Barkan ... See as well Deborah L. Krohn, Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens (London and New York, 2015). 57.

Author: Leonard Barkan

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691222387

Category: Art

Page: 328

View: 674

An enticing history of food and drink in Western art and culture Eating and drinking can be aesthetic experiences as well as sensory ones. The Hungry Eye takes readers from antiquity to the Renaissance to explore the central role of food and drink in literature, art, philosophy, religion, and statecraft. In this beautifully illustrated book, Leonard Barkan provides an illuminating meditation on how culture finds expression in what we eat and drink. Plato's Symposium is a timeless philosophical text, one that also describes a drinking party. Salome performed her dance at a banquet where the head of John the Baptist was presented on a platter. Barkan looks at ancient mosaics, Dutch still life, and Venetian Last Suppers. He describes how ancient Rome was a paradise of culinary obsessives, and explains what it meant for the Israelites to dine on manna. He discusses the surprising relationship between Renaissance perspective and dinner parties, and sheds new light on the moment when the risen Christ appears to his disciples hungry for a piece of broiled fish. Readers will browse the pages of the Deipnosophistae—an ancient Greek work in sixteen volumes about a single meal, complete with menus—and gain epicurean insights into such figures as Rabelais and Shakespeare, Leonardo and Vermeer. A book for anyone who relishes the pleasures of the table, The Hungry Eye is an erudite and uniquely personal look at all the glorious ways that food and drink have transfigured Western arts and high culture.
Categories: Art

Food and Landscape Proceedings of the 2017 Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery

Food and Landscape  Proceedings of the 2017 Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery

Ross, Italian Sketches (London: 1887); Florentine Palaces and Their Stories (London. 1905); Old Florence and Modern ... Deborah Krohn, Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (New York: Routledge, 2015). 19. John Farley, The London Art ...

Author: Mark McWilliams

Publisher: Oxford Symposium

ISBN: 9781909248625

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 985

The proceedings of the 2017 Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery includes 43 essays by international scholars. The topics included agro-ecology, food sovereignty and economic democracy in the agricultural landscape, argued by Colin Tudge, James Rebanks on family life as a hill-farmer in the Lake District, and many talks that illustrate Catalan historian Joseph Pla's axiom that 'Cuisine is the landscape in a saucepan'.
Categories: Social Science

The Oxford Handbook of History and Material Culture

The Oxford Handbook of History and Material Culture

Krohn, Deborah L. Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy: Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens. Abingdon, UK: Ashgate, 2015. Parshall, Peter. “Antonio Lafreri's Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae.” The Print Quarterly 23 (2006): 3–28.

Author: Ivan Gaskell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780197500132

Category: Social Science

Page: 696

View: 387

Most historians rely principally on written sources. Yet there are other traces of the past available to historians: the material things that people have chosen, made, and used. This book examines how material culture can enhance historians' understanding of the past, both worldwide and across time. The successful use of material culture in history depends on treating material things of many kinds not as illustrations, but as primary evidence. Each kind of material thing-and there are many-requires the application of interpretive skills appropriate to it. These skills overlap with those acquired by scholars in disciplines that may abut history but are often relatively unfamiliar to historians, including anthropology, archaeology, and art history. Creative historians can adapt and apply the same skills they honed while studying more traditional text-based documents even as they borrow methods from these fields. They can think through familiar historical problems in new ways. They can also deploy material culture to discover the pasts of constituencies who have left few or no traces in written records. The authors of this volume contribute case studies arranged thematically in six sections that respectively address the relationship of history and material culture to cognition, technology, the symbolic, social distinction, and memory. They range across time and space, from Paleolithic to Punk.
Categories: Social Science