Forms of Exile in Jewish Literature and Thought

Forms of Exile in Jewish Literature and Thought

This study has covered the various forms that exile took in the twentieth century by way of analyzing Jewish writers and thinkers (and occasionally other artists who address Jewish topics). I have chosen Jewish writers and thinkers ...

Author: Bronislava Volková

Publisher: Academic Studies PRess

ISBN: 9781644694077

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 120

View: 592

Forms of Exile in Jewish Literature and Thought deals with the concept of exile on many levels—from the literal to the metaphorical. It combines analyses of predominantly Jewish authors of Central Europe of the twentieth century who are not usually connected, including Kafka, Kraus, Levi, Lustig, Wiesel, and Frankl. It follows the typical routes that exiled writers took, from East to West and later often as far as America. The concept and forms of exile are analyzed from many different points of view and great importance is devoted especially to the forms of inner exile. In Forms of Exile in Jewish Literature and Thought, Bronislava Volková, an exile herself and thus intimately familiar with the topic through her own experience, develops a unique typology of exile that will enrich the field of intellectual and literary history of twentieth-century Europe and America.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Exile and Restoration in Jewish Thought

Exile and Restoration in Jewish Thought

Conceptually as well as materially, the Gaonic era was conditioned by the experience of exile. The first millennium saw the institutionalizing of Diaspora Judaism manifested in the creation of the great Babylonian academies and the ...

Author: Ralph Keen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441118271

Category: Religion

Page: 182

View: 968

Exile and Restoration in Jewish Thought presents the history of an idea originating at the intersection of Judaic piety and the social history of the Jews: faith in a protective sovereign deity amid contrary conditions. Exiled primordially (Eden), during the Patriarchal era, in the sixth century bce, and from the first century to the twentieth, the Jewish experience of alienation has been the historical backdrop against which affirmations of divine benevolence have been constructed. While histories of Jewish thought have tended to accentuate the speculative creativity of medieval and modern Jewish philosophers, the intellectual tradition can come into focus only with attention to these thinkers' understanding of diaspora and persecution. Ralph Keen describes the distinguishing feature of Jewish thought as a religious hermeneutic in which the primitive promise made to Abraham is preserved not just as a pious memory but as a certain hope for eventual restoration. Intended for readers with some familiarity with the history of philosophy, this book offers the historical context necessary for understanding the distinctively Judaic character of this tradition of thought, and elucidates the role of religious experience in the long process of negotiating between adversity and expectation.
Categories: Religion

Jewish Exiles and European Thought during the Third Reich

Jewish Exiles and European Thought during the Third Reich

Born “in the nexus of Judaism and Christianity,” this approach embodies “one of the conditions of the literary project of the West.”5 Philology becomes an integral and formidable ideological tool and figural interpretation a powerful ...

Author: David Weinstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107166462

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 515

Hans Baron, Karl Popper, Leo Strauss and Erich Auerbach were among the many German-speaking Jewish intellectuals who fled Continental Europe with the rise of Nazism in the 1930s. Their scholarship, though not normally considered together, is studied here to demonstrate how, despite their different disciplines and distinctive modes of working, they responded polemically in the guise of traditional scholarship to their shared trauma. For each, the political calamity of European fascism was a profound intellectual crisis, requiring an intellectual response which Weinstein and Zakai now contextualize, ideologically and politically. They exemplify just how extensively, and sometimes how subtly, 1930s and 1940s scholarship was used not only to explain, but to fight the political evils that had infected modernity, victimizing so many. An original perspective on a popular area of research, this book draws upon a mass of secondary literature to provide an innovative and valuable contribution to twentieth-century intellectual history.
Categories: History

The Writer Uprooted

The Writer Uprooted

Profiles important new Jewish immigrant writers in America

Author: Alvin Hirsch Rosenfeld

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105131723939

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 477

Profiles important new Jewish immigrant writers in America
Categories: History

German Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife

German Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife

Highlighting these elements of theJewish tradition in the works of Franz Kafka, Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Hannah Arendt, and Paul Celan, Liska reflects on dialogues and conversations between themandonthereception of their work.She ...

Author: Vivian Liska

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253025005

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 839

InGerman-Jewish Thought and Its Afterlife,Vivian Liska innovatively focuses on the changing form, fate and function of messianism, law, exile, election, remembrance, and the transmission of tradition itself in three different temporal and intellectual frameworks: German-Jewish modernism, postmodernism, and the current period. Highlighting these elements of theJewish tradition in the works of Franz Kafka, Walter Benjamin, Gershom Scholem, Hannah Arendt, and Paul Celan, Liska reflects on dialogues and conversations between themandonthereception of their work.She shows how this Jewish dimension of their writings is transformed, but remains significant in the theories of Maurice Blanchot and Jacques Derrida and how it is appropriated, dismissed or denied by some of the most acclaimed thinkers at the turn of the twenty-first century such as Giorgio Agamben, Slavoj i ek, and Alain Badiou.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Use and Function of Scripture in 1 Maccabees

The Use and Function of Scripture in 1 Maccabees

The idea of a continuing exile was already expressed by Peter R. Ackroyd, Exile and Restoration: A Study of Hebrew ... exile as a continued condition, nevertheless identifies three types of exile in Jewish apocalyptic literature: (1) a ...

Author: Dongbin Choi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567695451

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 709

Dongbin Choi offers a philological and thematic analysis on the scriptural language in the book of 1 Maccabees, a text that is written with a linguistic technique that utilizes earlier Jewish texts in order to promote the religiopolitical agendas of its author. Choi engages in the dialogue between the traditional view that treats 1 Maccabees as a religious writing, and the radical view that considers it as political propaganda. Choi suggests that the author of 1 Maccabees deploys scriptural language in such a nuanced way that he both promotes the legitimacy of the Hasmonean rule in Judea under John Hyrcanus I, and shows his appreciation of conservative Jewish sensitivity toward their traditions relating to Deuteronomic covenant, biblical judges, and Jewish messianism. By discussing past scholarly literature on the use and function of Scripture in 1 Maccabees, analyzing various literary, political, and cultural aspects that influenced the creation of the text, and finally exploring philological and conceptual parallels between Scripture and 1 Maccabees and the use of Scripture in the eulogies of the Hasmoneans, Choi has created a singular reinterpretation of both text and author.
Categories: Religion

Gathered Around Jesus

Gathered Around Jesus

There are numerous texts that fall into this category, and this idea is especially prevalent in apocalyptic literature.192 There are essentially two ways in which the exile was thought to continue in the second temple period.

Author: Eric C Stewart

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9780227903124

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 719

This innovative study makes a major contribution to the long scholarly discussion of the problematic geography of Mark's Gospel. Using both modern spatial theory and an exhaustive review of ancient evidence, Stewart demonstrates how Mark's spatial perceptions reflect Greek, Roman and Jewish understandings of human geography. He addresses Mark's editorial and compositional control over the geographic presentation of Jesusis ministry, ultimately arguing that in Mark, Jesus offers a unique spatialpractice.
Categories: Religion

The People and the Books 18 Classics of Jewish Literature

The People and the Books  18 Classics of Jewish Literature

Just as consequentially, however, the Babylonian Exile marked the birth of a complex new form of Jewish life: Diaspora. Even when some Israelites returned to Judah, many, perhaps most, stayed behind. In Babylon they developed new forms ...

Author: Adam Kirsch

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393608311

Category: Religion

Page: 432

View: 982

An accessible introduction to the classics of Jewish literature, from the Bible to modern times, by "one of America’s finest literary critics" (Wall Street Journal). Jews have long embraced their identity as “the people of the book.” But outside of the Bible, much of the Jewish literary tradition remains little known to nonspecialist readers. The People and the Books shows how central questions and themes of our history and culture are reflected in the Jewish literary canon: the nature of God, the right way to understand the Bible, the relationship of the Jews to their Promised Land, and the challenges of living as a minority in Diaspora. Adam Kirsch explores eighteen classic texts, including the biblical books of Deuteronomy and Esther, the philosophy of Maimonides, the autobiography of the medieval businesswoman Glückel of Hameln, and the Zionist manifestoes of Theodor Herzl. From the Jews of Roman Egypt to the mystical devotees of Hasidism in Eastern Europe, The People and the Books brings the treasures of Jewish literature to life and offers new ways to think about their enduring power and influence.
Categories: Religion

Yale Companion to Jewish Writing and Thought in German Culture 1096 1996

Yale Companion to Jewish Writing and Thought in German Culture  1096 1996

The restrained discourse of the German - Jewish literary imagination in those years definitely had more to do with nineteenth and ... In the 1950s , German culture quickly adapted to this solution of extended displacement and exile .

Author: Sander Lawrence Gilman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300068245

Category: Reference

Page: 864

View: 773

A unique collection of essays--written by more than one hundred scholars and arranged chronologically--provides a history of Jewish writing and thought in German-speaking lands, highlighting the impact of Jewish writers on German culture. UP.
Categories: Reference

Leadership and Conflict

Leadership and Conflict

exile'.2 This negative ambience of galut in traditional Jewish literature has been highlighted and accentuated by ... from the Land of Israel and the end of exile as return to that land—is occasionally subverted in unexpected ways.

Author: Marc Saperstein

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781789627831

Category: History

Page: 379

View: 922

This masterly collection of essays offers a multifaceted analysis of how Jewish leaders in medieval and early modern times responded to the challenges presented by a changing world. Based largely on the study of sermons and response - genres that show them addressing real situations in the lives of their people - the book reveals how they handled intellectual, social, and political diversity and conflict. As medieval Jews were exposed to new philosophical ideas, many began to question and challenge rabbinical leadership. Leadership and Conflict explores the process by which these ideas became more accessible, the doubts that consequently arose regarding certain biblical and rabbinic texts, and the attempt by some leaders to ban the study of philosophical texts altogether. The book also addresses the rhetoric of rebuke used by preachers to criticize behavior within their community that they considered to be a violation of Jewish law and tradition. Another set of challenges to traditional Jewish life emerged from political developments in the wider world, including the unification of France, the Spanish Inquisition and Edict of Expulsion, and the beginning of the Counter-Reformation. Leadership and Conflict asks whether criticism of the talent and leadership of rabbis in such times of crisis was justified. The final section of the book is devoted to conflicting attitudes within Jewish society: towards the Holy Land, exile and diasporic existence, and messianic movements and personalities. Leadership and Conflict represents three decades of scholarship by Professor Marc Saperstein, a distinguished historian. Bringing his perceptive essays together in a single volume allows a new generation of students and scholars to have access to his insights and conclusions.
Categories: History