Hazlitt the Dissenter

Hazlitt the Dissenter

Hazlitt Sr's Discourses was particularly popular among the students, tutors, and governorsof New College, Hackney. ... that Hazlitt's literary debut was printed on 4 November, a day of great significance in the Dissenters' calendar.

Author: Stephen Burley

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137364449

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 679

Hazlitt the Dissenter is unique in providing the first book-length account of Hazlitt's early life as a dissenter, and how this shaped his literary apprenticeship until 1816. Each chapter draws on a substantial body of new material – including a range of previously unattributed writings by Hazlitt and his father - to offer fresh readings of important early writings. Its multidisciplinary approach, chronological focus, and appreciation of denominational difference and theological nuance make it invaluable reading for anyone interested in literary and religious history on both sides of the Atlantic. As the first multi-disciplinary account of Hazlitt's early literary career, it provides a new insight into the literary, intellectual, political and religious culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Challenging the prevailing critical understanding of Hazlitt as a 'Romantic essayist' or 'radical journalist', Hazlitt the Dissenter presents an innovative portrait of one of the great English prose writers.
Categories: History

Hazlitt the Dissenter

Hazlitt the Dissenter

Hazlitt the Dissenter is unique in providing the first book-length account of Hazlitt's early life as a dissenter.

Author: Stephen Burley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137364432

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 111

Hazlitt the Dissenter is unique in providing the first book-length account of Hazlitt's early life as a dissenter. As the first multi-disciplinary account of Hazlitt's early literary career, it provides a new insight into the literary, intellectual, political and religious culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century.
Categories: History

The works of Daniel De Foe ed by W Hazlitt

The works of Daniel De Foe  ed   by W  Hazlitt

Daniel Defoe William Hazlitt. THE SINCERITY OF THE DISSENTERS VINDICATED . In the argument against occasional conformity , was itself a trick , being pretended to be not it is not improper to observe there are two sorts against them ...

Author: Daniel Defoe

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:600002744

Category:

Page:

View: 214

Categories:

Rational Dissenters in Late Eighteenth Century E an Ardent Desire of Truth

Rational Dissenters in Late Eighteenth Century E    an Ardent Desire of Truth

Stephen Burley's illuminating study of William Hazlitt has assumed a connection between the rejection of the doctrines of original sin and of atonement and this spirit of optimism, but in fact for Rational Dissenters this optimism did ...

Author: Valerie Smith

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9781783275663

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 698

Rational Dissent was a branch of Protestant religious nonconformity which emerged to prominence in England between c. 1770 and c. 1800. While small, the movement provoked fierce opposition from both Anglicans and Orthodox Dissenters.
Categories: History

Henry Crabb Robinson

Henry Crabb Robinson

It proves that Hazlitt and Robinson were not in touch while Robinson was in Germany, and that hence there cannot have ... and the refutation of self-interest by the philosopher Joseph Butler, an erstwhile Dissenter turned conformist.10 ...

Author: Philipp Hunnekuhl

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781789627589

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 378

This is the first book-length study of the thought and literary achievement of Henry Crabb Robinson (1775-1867). It restores the long-neglected Robinson to the central position he occupied in his own time, namely as a pioneering critic, comparatist, and literary disseminator at the crossroads of British and European Romanticism.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Conversable Worlds

Conversable Worlds

from the collisions of mixed social spaces are those that affirm the theatre's importance for Hazlitt. ... HAZLITT AND DISSENT Earlier chapters of this book have placed eighteenth-century ideas of politeness and rational improvement in ...

Author: Jon Mee

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191618727

Category: Literary Collections

Page:

View: 740

Conversable Worlds addresses the emergence of the idea of 'the conversation of culture'. Around 1700 a new commercial society was emerging that thought of its values as the product of exchanges between citizens. Conversation became increasingly important as a model and as a practice for how community could be created. A welter of publications, in periodical essays, in novels, and in poetry, enjoined the virtues of conversation. These publications were enthusiastically read and discussed in book clubs and literary societies that created their own conversable worlds. From some perspectives, the freedom of a distinctively English conversation allowed for the 'collision' of ideas and sentiments. For others, like Joseph Addison and David Hume, ease of 'flow' was the key issue, and politeness the means of establishing a via media. For Addison and Hume, the feminization of culture promised to make women the sovereigns of what Hume called 'the conversable world'. As the culture seemed to open up to a multitude of voices, anxieties appeared as to how far things should be allowed to go. The unruliness of the crowd threatened to disrupt the channels of communication. There was a parallel fear that mere feminized chatter might replace learning. This book examines the influence of these developments on the idea of literature from 1762 through to 1830. Part I examines the conversational paradigm established by figures like Addison and Hume, and the proliferation of conversable worlds into gatherings like Johnson's Club and Montagu's Bluestocking assemblies. Part II looks at the transition from the eighteenth century to 'Romantic' ideas of literary culture, the question of the withdrawal from mixed social space, the drive to sublimate verbal exchange into forms that retained dialogue without contention in places like Coleridge's 'conversation poems,' and the continuing tensions between ideas of the republic of letters as a space of vigorous exchange as opposed to the organic unfolding of consciousness.
Categories: Literary Collections

John Keats in Context

John Keats in Context

Hazlitt the Dissenter: Religion, Philosophy, and Politics, 1766–1816. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. Jones Stanley. Hazlitt: A Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Metaphysical Hazlitt: Bicentenary Essays.

Author: Michael O'Neill

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108508841

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 241

John Keats (1795–1821) continues to delight and challenge readers both within and beyond the academic community through his poems and letters. This volume provides frameworks for enhanced analysis and appreciation of Keats and his work, with each chapter supplying a succinct, informed, and accessible account of a particular topic. Leading scholars examine the life and work of Keats against the backdrop of his influences, contemporaries, and reception, and explore the interaction of poet and world. The essays consider his enduring but ever-altering appeal, engage with critical discussion and debate, and offer revisionary close reading of the poems and letters. Students and specialists will find their knowledge of Keats's life and work enriched by chapters that survey subjects ranging from education, relationships, and religion to art, genre, and film.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Travels in Revolutionary France and a Journey Across America

Travels in Revolutionary France and a Journey Across America

7 D. A. Rees, 'George Cadogan Morgan at Oxford', Enlightenment and Dissent, 1 (1982), 89. ... Hackney, 'the ultimate endeavour among liberal dissenters', see Stephen Burley, 'Hazlitt the Dissenter: Religion, Philosophy and Politics ...

Author:

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 9780708325599

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 461

In July 1789 George Cadogan Morgan, born in Bridgend, Wales, and the nephew of the celebrated radical dissenter Richard Price (1723-91), found himself caught up in the opening events of the French Revolution and its consequences. In 1808, his family left Britain for America where his son, Richard Price Morgan, travelled extensively, made a descent of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers by raft and helped build some of the early American railroads. The adventures of both men are related here via letters George sent home to his family from France and through the autobiography written by his son in America.
Categories: History