Heart Failure and Palliative Care

Heart Failure and Palliative Care

Heart failure is a very common terminal condition but few patients receive proper palliative care. This text is full of practical, evidence based advice, and encourages a multidisciplinary team based approrach.

Author: Miriam Johnson

Publisher: Radcliffe Publishing

ISBN: 1857756436

Category: Medical

Page: 150

View: 710

Heart failure is a very common terminal condition but few patients receive proper palliative care. This text is full of practical, evidence based advice, and encourages a multidisciplinary team based approrach.
Categories: Medical

Issues in Heart Failure Nursing

Issues in Heart Failure Nursing

This eclectic collection of papers tackles many of the issues that concern those who care for individuals with heart failure; organisation of services, exercise, palliative care amongst them, but also novel and rarely discussed issues.

Author: Chris Jones

Publisher: M&K Update Ltd

ISBN: 9781907830006

Category: Medical

Page: 155

View: 331

The number of people suffering from this debilitating condition is predicted to grow exponentially over the next decade. This has serious implications for the health services. Investigating heart failure is not cheap even where facilities exist. The drugs used, though effective – often remarkably so – are also costly as are laboratory investigations. These again are not cheap. People with heart failure require frequent admissions to hospital and occupy many beds and much staff attention. All of these factors are set to increase over the next decades. This eclectic collection of papers tackles many of the issues that concern those who care for individuals with heart failure; organisation of services, exercise, palliative care amongst them, but also novel and rarely discussed issues. The book is suited to both pre and post-registered health care students. We do not supply inspection copies but we do supply Examination copies, whereby a course leader has 30 days to evaluate the book, then choose to adopt, purchase or return the book. If you are interested in further details please do not hesitate in contacting me. CONTENTS: Preface - Chris Jones Foreword Professor Martin Cowie Heart failure in the community: a confusion of protocols District nurses meeting the challenge of heart failure The care of patients who develop heart failure alongside mental health problems Adults with congenital heart disease and heart failure Cardiac resynchronisation therapy Congestive heart failure and cognitive dysfunction Sexual dysfunction in heart failure Exercise training in the management of patients with heart failure: a review of the evidence Exercise: the things we don't know Improved symptom control in palliative care for heart failure Improving palliative care service provision for patients with heart failure Assisted dying and heart failure
Categories: Medical

Heart Failure

Heart Failure

In easily digestible summaries, this book presents practical advice about how and when to integrate a palliative care approach alongside standard heart failure management.

Author: Miriam Johnson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199299300

Category: Medical

Page: 216

View: 441

Excellent end of life care for people with heart failure is challenging but possible. In easily digestible summaries, this book presents practical advice about how and when to integrate a palliative care approach alongside standard heart failure management.
Categories: Medical

Communication about the Heart Failure Trajectory in Patients their Families and Health Care Professionals

Communication about the Heart Failure Trajectory in Patients  their Families and Health Care Professionals

A Question Prompt List and a communication course might be useful for improving communication about the heart failure trajectory in patients, their families, and health care professionals

Author: Lisa Hjelmfors

Publisher: Linköping University Electronic Press

ISBN: 9789176853566

Category:

Page: 90

View: 180

Introduction: There is an increasing awareness in the field of cardiology regarding the need for improved delivery of palliative care in patients with heart failure (HF). Professional guidelines have drawn attention to the importance of discussing the heart failure trajectory with patients and their families. These discussions can include, for example, talking about the prognosis, expectations for the future, and care at the end-of-life. It seems difficult for health care professionals to choose the right time for initiating these discussions. They often avoid these conversations because they are afraid of taking away hope and make the patients and their families anxious. Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to improve communication about the heart failure trajectory in patients, their families, and health care professionals. Design and methods: This thesis includes five studies using different designs and data collection methods. Study I has a cross-sectional design using a questionnaire to collect data to describe heart failure nurses’ perceptions of and practice in discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with heart failure patients. Study II has a descriptive and comparative design, where a survey was performed to describe Swedish and Dutch heart failure nurses’ reasons for discussing or not discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with patients. Study III has an inductive and exploratory design, where HF patients participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Data was collected based on their perceptions of communication about the heart failure prognosis. Study IV was a small-scale ethnographic study describing and evaluating the delivery of a simulation when teaching third-year nursing students about end-of-life care at a Swedish university. Study V used co-design in which patients with HF from primary care, their family members and health care professionals (physicians and nurses) from palliative and HF care were invited to be constructive participants in the design process of a communication intervention. Health care professionals participated in a first feasibility testing of the intervention. Results: Most Swedish HF nurses had discussed prognosis (96%) and end-of-life care (84%) with a HF patient at some point in clinical practice. The nurses often reported that a physician was to have the main responsibility for such discussions (69%), but that the nurse was also believed to have a role to play (I). Prognosis and end-of-life care were, together with sexual activity, () the three least frequently discussed topics in HF clinics in both Sweden and the Netherlands (II). In conversations with 1,809 Swedish and Dutch HF patients, prognosis was discussed with 38% of the patients and end-of-life care was discussed with 10%. In study III, patients expressed different experiences of and preferences for communication about their HF prognosis. Many patients described that the health care professionals had not provided them with any prognosis information at all. The patients had different understandings of HF as a chronic illness, which had an impact on their preferences for communication about their prognosis (III). The simulation training described in the ethnographic study (IV) was part of an end-of-life care simulation during the last term of the 3- year bachelor degree level nursing education program, where students learn and practice basic palliative care. The students felt that the simulation training was a good opportunity to practice handling end-of- life situations as it gave them a chance to experience this situation and their own feelings and thoughts on death and dying. In study V, an intervention to improve communication about prognosis and end-of-life care in HF care was developed and some areas were feasibility tested. Heart failure patients, their families and health care professionals working in HF care or palliative care participated in the development process. Health care professionals (nurses and physicians) participated in the following feasibility testing of the intervention. Conclusions: This thesis shows that prognosis and end-of-life care are seldom discussed with HF patients in Swedish and Dutch heart failure care. and that many heart failure nurses have ambiguous attitudes towards discussing these topics with patients and their families (I+II). The patients described that they receive different messages concerning their heart failure, and that they also have different preferences for discussing the heart failure trajectory with health care professionals. The professionals need to understand the impact of heart failure on each patient and adapt the communication to each individual (III). End-of-life care simulation with skilled supervisors shows great promise for health care professionals to learn good communication skills in end-of-life care conversations (IV). A Question Prompt List and a communication course might be useful for improving communication about the heart failure trajectory in patients, their families, and health care professionals
Categories:

Team Based Care for Heart Failure An Issue of Heart Failure Clinics

Team Based Care for Heart Failure  An Issue of Heart Failure Clinics

This issue of Heart Failure Clinics examines the critical role of team-based care in the management of patients with heart failure.

Author: Gregg C. Fonarow

Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences

ISBN: 9780323391016

Category: Medical

Page: 177

View: 157

This issue of Heart Failure Clinics examines the critical role of team-based care in the management of patients with heart failure. Articles address Team-Based Care for Prevention, Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure, Transitions of Care, Outpatients, Managing Cardiac Comorbidities, Managing Non-cardiac Conditions, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Training, External Telemonitoring, Ambulatory Hemodynamic Cardiac Device Monitoring, Advanced Heart Failure, and Palliative and End-of-Life Care.
Categories: Medical

Nursing Times

Nursing Times

KEYWORDS CARDIAC CARE • PALLIATIVE CARE • COMMUNICATION
COMMUNICATION IN END - OF - LIFE CARDIAC CARE 1 : DIFFICULT ISSUES
KEY POINTS ON PROVIDING PALLIATIVE CARE IN HEART FAILURE THIS
ARTICLE ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSD:31822034143727

Category: Nurses

Page:

View: 514

Categories: Nurses

Supportive Care in Heart Failure

Supportive Care in Heart Failure

Supportive care is integral to comprehensive heart failure care, and this book provides an evidence-based overview of the aetiology, management and supportive care of patients throughout the course of the disease.

Author: James Beattie

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198570287

Category: Medical

Page: 491

View: 347

Supportive care is integral to comprehensive heart failure care. It addresses communication with the patient and family, decision-making and education, symptom management, quality of life, and psychological, spiritual and social aspects of care. The fifth book in the Supportive Care series, Supportive Care in Heart Failure provides an evidence-based overview of heart failure aetiology, management, and supportive care of patients throughout the course of heartfailure. Chapters cover heart failure epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment, communication with patients and carers, management of common problems and symptoms in heart failure patients, prognostication, end of life care, and bereavement.
Categories: Medical

Handbook of Palliative Care

Handbook of Palliative Care

This handbook offers a practical, thorough approach to the clinical practice of palliative care.

Author: Christina Faull

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118426814

Category: Medical

Page: 392

View: 803

This handbook offers a practical, thorough approach to the clinical practice of palliative care. Adding North American authors to its roster of UK contributors, the third edition of this award-winning book addresses important changes in the evidence base of palliative care, as well as an emphasis on end-of-life community-based care. It features new chapters on dementia and advance care planning, a simplified lymphoedema discussion, and an ongoing commitment to providing essential guidance for physicians, nurses, and all primary care providers involved in palliative care in hospital, hospice, and community settings.
Categories: Medical

End of Life Care in Cardiovascular Disease

End of Life Care in Cardiovascular Disease

This book provides guidance to clinicians working across the breadth of care settings, in chronic progressive disease as well as sudden arrhythmic death andwith advanced technologies.

Author: Sarah J. Goodlin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781447165217

Category: Medical

Page: 240

View: 678

End-of-life issues in cardiology are becoming increasingly important in the management of patients in the cardiac unit, but there is frequently a lack of understanding regarding their impact on cardiology practice. The cardiac unit is increasingly becoming the location whereby a number of key clinical decisions relating to end-of-life care are being made, such as the decision to remove medications, the appropriate removal of cardiac devices, the management of do not resuscitate orders and the requirement for other cardiac procedures in light of the management of the terminally ill cardiac patients. Those working in palliative care need input from the cardiovascular team as the cardiologist is frequently still managing these patients until they are moved to the hospice. That this move into a hospice is often delayed until the very last moment, there is considerable onus on the cardiovascular management of these patients to be much broader in scope and take account of some of the more palliative medical decisions needed in this group of patients. This concise reference will detail the practical issues open to cardiovascular physicians and those medical professionals who manage patients reaching the end of their life from a cardiology perspective. It will detail the full management options open to them to ensure that their practice is in line with the requirements of the patient nearing the end of their life whether the cause be cardiovascular in origin or who need appropriate management of secondary cardiovascular symptoms. It will also include the various ethical, cultural and geographical issues that need to be considered when managing these patients.
Categories: Medical