Improvising Sabor

Improvising Sabor

WHY IMPROVISING SABOR? Central to this research is an examination of “Latin” performance aesthetics using the Cuban charanga format (flute, violins, timbales, congas, güiro, piano, bass, and vocals), as the main case study.

Author: Sue Miller

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496832191

Category: Music

Page: 334

View: 550

Improvising Sabor: Cuban Dance Music in New York begins in 1960s New York and examines in rich detail the playing styles and international influence of important figures in US Latin music. Such innovators as José Fajardo, Johnny Pacheco, George Castro, and Eddy Zervigón dazzled the Palladium ballroom and other Latin music venues in those crucible years. Author Sue Miller focuses on the Cuban flute style in light of its transformations in the US after the 1959 revolution and within the vibrant context of 1960s New York. While much about Latin jazz and salsa has been written, this book focuses on the relatively unexplored New York charangas that were performing during the chachachá and pachanga craze of the early sixties. Indeed, many accounts cut straight from the 1950s and the mambo to the bugalú’s development in the late 1960s with little mention of the chachachá and pachanga’s popularity in the mid-twentieth century. Improvising Sabor addresses not only this lost and ignored history, but contends with issues of race, class, and identity while evaluating differences in style between players from prerevolution Cuban charangas and those of 1960s New York. Through comprehensive explorations and transcriptions of numerous musical examples as well as interviews with and commentary from Latin musicians, Improvising Sabor highlights a specific sabor that is rooted in both Cuban dance music forms and the rich performance culture of Latin New York. The distinctive styles generated by these musicians sparked compelling points of departure and influence.
Categories: Music

American Sabor

American Sabor

The band was also distinguished by Eddie Palmieri's arranging style, which combined rhythmic groove, excitingbreaks, and improvisational freedom. His 1965 hit “Azúcar Pa' Ti,” for example, begins with a dramatic break and tensejazzy ...

Author: Marisol Berros-Miranda

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295742632

Category: Music

Page: 352

View: 187

Evoking the pleasures of music as well as food, the word sabor signifies a rich essence that makes our mouths water or makes our bodies want to move. American Sabor traces the substantial musical contributions of Latinas and Latinos in American popular music between World War II and the present in five vibrant centers of [email protected] musical production: New York, Los Angeles, San Antonio, San Francisco, and Miami. From Tito Puente�s mambo dance rhythms to the Spanglish rap of Mellow Man Ace, American Sabor focuses on musical styles that have developed largely in the United States�including jazz, rhythm and blues, rock, punk, hip hop, country, Tejano, and salsa�but also shows the many ways in which [email protected] musicians and styles connect US culture to the culture of the broader Americas. With side-by-side Spanish and English text, authors Marisol Berr�os-Miranda, Shannon Dudley, and Michelle Habell-Pall�n challenge the white and black racial framework that structures most narratives of popular music in the United States. They present the regional histories of [email protected] communities�including Chicanos, Tejanos, and Puerto Ricans�in distinctive detail, and highlight the shared experiences of immigration/migration, racial boundary crossing, contesting gender roles, youth innovation, and articulating an American experience through music. In celebrating the musical contributions of Latinos and Latinas, American Sabor illuminates a cultural legacy that enriches us all.
Categories: Music

Studies in Historical Improvisation

Studies in Historical Improvisation

... nuns of Coimbra monasteries.60 On the contrary, Azpilcueta criticizes all those singers who improvise “contrapunto”, ... o solemnes, en las misas, y en los otros officios divinos, algunas consonancias que tengan sabor de melodía, ...

Author: Massimiliano Guido

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317048947

Category: Music

Page: 220

View: 711

In recent years, scholars and musicians have become increasingly interested in the revival of musical improvisation as it was known in the Renaissance and Baroque periods. This historically informed practice is now supplanting the late Romantic view of improvised music as a rhapsodic endeavour—a musical blossoming out of the capricious genius of the player—that dominated throughout the twentieth century. In the Renaissance and Baroque eras, composing in the mind (alla mente) had an important didactic function. For several categories of musicians, the teaching of counterpoint happened almost entirely through practice on their own instruments. This volume offers the first systematic exploration of the close relationship among improvisation, music theory, and practical musicianship from late Renaissance into the Baroque era. It is not a historical survey per se, but rather aims to re-establish the importance of such a combination as a pedagogical tool for a better understanding of the musical idioms of these periods. The authors are concerned with the transferral of historical practices to the modern classroom, discussing new ways of revitalising the study and appreciation of early music. The relevance and utility of such an improvisation-based approach also changes our understanding of the balance between theoretical and practical sources in the primary literature, as well as the concept of music theory itself. Alongside a word-centred theoretical tradition, in which rules are described in verbiage and enriched by musical examples, we are rediscovering the importance of a music-centred tradition, especially in Spain and Italy, where the music stands alone and the learner must distil the rules by learning and playing the music. Throughout its various sections, the volume explores the path of improvisation from theory to practice and back again.
Categories: Music

Improvisation and the Making of American Literary Modernism

Improvisation and the Making of American Literary Modernism

Stevens was not a jazz poet; but he was an improvisational poet whose interest in black culture, ... Like much in Stevens, however, it is tricky to parse which elements are mere exotic spices—like the sabor Latino of the phrase “fluent ...

Author: Rob Wallace

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441122896

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 322

Improvisation, despite its almost ubiquitous presence in many art forms, is notoriously misunderstood and mysterious. Although earlier strands of American philosophy and art emphasized what might be called improvisational practices, it was during the modernist period that improvisational practice and theory began to make a significant impact on art and culture, specifically via the African American musical forms of jazz and blues. This musical development held important consequences for the larger artistic, cultural, and political life of America as a whole-and, eventually, the world. The historical convergence of jazz and philosophical currents like pragmatism in American culture provides the framework for Wallace's discussion of improvisation in literary modernism. Focusing on poets ranging from Gertrude Stein to Langston Hughes, Wallace's work provides a fresh perspective on the complex circuits of modernist culture. Improvisation and The Making of American Literary Modernism will be of interest to scholars of poetry, music, American and modernist studies, and race and ethnic studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Rumba Afro Cuban Conga Drum Improvisation Volume 2

Rumba   Afro Cuban Conga Drum Improvisation  Volume 2

Thanks to his constant support and friendship, Cliff learned to play with “sabor”. In 1985 Cliff moved to San Francisco where he met his wife of 15 years to date, Judith Justiz. Judith brought Afro–Cuban folkloric dance to the Bay Area ...

Author: CLIFF BROOKS

Publisher: Mel Bay Publications

ISBN: 9781610658584

Category: Music

Page: 112

View: 876

This book is designed to take your soloing ability from 0 to 90 MPH on the quinto, conga drum, bongo or timbales while mastering the clave rhythm at the same time. It is rich with authentic phrasing. Volume 2 has much to offer for beginners and veterans alike. the book will widened your soloing horizons, and is something you will continually refer back to for ideas and inspiration. You will enjoy learning many of these unique and interesting flavorsThis teaching method brings together two different learning approaches for Afro-Cuban Drumming. the first approach is to learn by way of reading written notation; the second is to learn solely by listening and feeling. Three types of Afro-Cuban syncopated expressions are transcribed in this book: Quinto Ride, Quinto Phrase, and Quinto Solo. the helpful companion CDs allows one to hear these expressions ensuring proper comprehension of the concepts taught in this lesson.
Categories: Music

World Music Pedagogy Volume VI School Community Intersections

World Music Pedagogy  Volume VI  School Community Intersections

A: I like pianist Ricardo (Richie) Ray for his combination of “sabor” and the virtuosity in his piano montunos and his amazing improvisations. Richie plays a combination of classical piano, especially Chopin, with montunos that are rich ...

Author: Patricia Shehan Campbell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351655040

Category: Music

Page: 204

View: 823

World Music Pedagogy, Volume VI: School-Community Intersections provides students with a resource for delving into the meaning of "world music" across a broad array of community contexts and develops the multiple meanings of community relative to teaching and learning music of global and local cultures. It clarifies the critical need for teachers to work in tandem with community musicians and artists in order to bridge the unnecessary gulf that often separates school music from the music of the world beyond school and to consider the potential for genuine collaborations across this gulf. The five-layered features of World Music Pedagogy are specifically addressed in various school-community intersections, with attention to the collaboration of teachers with local community artist-musicians and with community musicians-at-a-distance who are available virtually. The authors acknowledge the multiple routes teachers are taking to enable and encourage music learning in community contexts, such as their work in after-school academies, museums and libraries, eldercare centers, places of worship, parks and recreation centers, and other venues in which adults and children gather to learn music, make music, and become convivial through music This volume suggests that the world’s musical cultures may be found locally, can be tapped virtually, and are important in considerations of music teaching and learning in schools and community contexts. Authors describe working artists and teachers, scenarios, vignettes, and teaching and learning experiences that happen in communities and that embrace the role of community musicians in schools, all of which will be presented with supporting theoretical frameworks.
Categories: Music

Timba The Sound of the Cuban Crisis

Timba  The Sound of the Cuban Crisis

... when presenting them, jazz-fashion, at the end of the show, allowing for occasional solo breaks with improvised passages. ... but there is always space for improvisation ... in the creation of the sabor [swing] of the piece.

Author: Vincenzo Perna

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351539081

Category: Music

Page: 376

View: 383

Cuban music is recognized unanimously as a major historical force behind Latin American popular music, and as an important player in the development of US popular music and jazz. However, the music produced on the island after the Revolution in 1959 has been largely overlooked and overshadowed by the Buena Vista Social Club phenomenon. The Revolution created the conditions for the birth of a type of highly sophisticated popular music, which has grown relatively free from market pressures. These conditions premised the new importance attained by Afro-Cuban dance music during the 1990s, when the island entered a period of deep economic and social crisis that has shaken Revolutionary institutions from their foundations. Vincenzo Perna investigates the role of black popular music in post-Revolutionary Cuba, and in the 1990s in particular. The emergence of timba is analysed as a distinctively new style of Afro-Cuban dance music. The controversial role of Afro-Cuban working class culture is highlighted, showing how this has resisted co-optation into a unified, pacified vision of national culture, and built musical bridges with the transnational black diaspora. Musically, timba represents an innovative fusion of previous popular and folkloric Afro-Cuban styles with elements of hip-hop and other African-American styles like jazz, funk and salsa. Timba articulates a black urban youth subculture with distinctive visual and choreographic codes. With its abrasive commentaries on issues such as race, consumer culture, tourism, prostitution and its connections to the underworld, timba demonstrates at the 'street level' many of the contradictions of contemporary Cuban society. After repeatedly colliding with official discourses, timba has eventually met with institutional repression. This book will appeal not only to ethnomusicologists and those working on popular music studies, but also to those working in the areas of cultural and Black studies, anthropology, Latin American st
Categories: Music

Improvising Sabor

Improvising Sabor

While much about Latin jazz and salsa has been written, this book focuses on the relatively unexplored New York charangas that were performing during the chachachá and pachanga craze of the early sixties.

Author: Sue Miller

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781496832177

Category: Music

Page: 334

View: 715

Improvising Sabor: Cuban Dance Music in New York begins in 1960s New York and examines in rich detail the playing styles and international influence of important figures in US Latin music. Such innovators as José Fajardo, Johnny Pacheco, George Castro, and Eddy Zervigón dazzled the Palladium ballroom and other Latin music venues in those crucible years. Author Sue Miller focuses on the Cuban flute style in light of its transformations in the US after the 1959 revolution and within the vibrant context of 1960s New York. While much about Latin jazz and salsa has been written, this book focuses on the relatively unexplored New York charangas that were performing during the chachachá and pachanga craze of the early sixties. Indeed, many accounts cut straight from the 1950s and the mambo to the bugalú’s development in the late 1960s with little mention of the chachachá and pachanga’s popularity in the mid-twentieth century. Improvising Sabor addresses not only this lost and ignored history, but contends with issues of race, class, and identity while evaluating differences in style between players from prerevolution Cuban charangas and those of 1960s New York. Through comprehensive explorations and transcriptions of numerous musical examples as well as interviews with and commentary from Latin musicians, Improvising Sabor highlights a specific sabor that is rooted in both Cuban dance music forms and the rich performance culture of Latin New York. The distinctive styles generated by these musicians sparked compelling points of departure and influence.
Categories: Music

The Great Woman Singer

The Great Woman Singer

See also Quintero Rivera, Salsa, sabor y control; and BofillCalero, “Improvisation in Jíbaro Music.” A wealth of information is available at the Cuatro Project (www.cuatropr.org). 7. There are other accounts of where her name came from.

Author: Licia Fiol-Matta

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822373469

Category: Music

Page: 312

View: 844

Licia Fiol-Matta traces the careers of four iconic Puerto Rican singers—Myrta Silva, Ruth Fernández, Ernestina Reyes, and Lucecita Benítez—to explore how their voices and performance style transform the possibilities for comprehending the figure of the woman singer. Fiol-Matta shows how these musicians, despite seemingly intractable demands to represent gender norms, exercised their artistic and political agency by challenging expectations of how they should look, sound, and act. Fiol-Matta also breaks with conceptualizations of the female pop voice as spontaneous and intuitive, interrogating the notion of "the great woman singer" to deploy her concept of the "thinking voice"—an event of music, voice, and listening that rewrites dominant narratives. Anchored in the work of Lacan, Foucault, and others, Fiol-Matta's theorization of voice and gender in The Great Woman Singer makes accessible the singing voice's conceptual dimensions while revealing a dynamic archive of Puerto Rican and Latin American popular music.
Categories: Music