Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

This new book aims to explore the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalisation of restorative justice within existing penal and criminal justice systems, an increasingly pressing issue given ...

Author: Ivo Aertsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134016662

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 921

This new book aims to explore the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalisation of restorative justice within existing penal and criminal justice systems, an increasingly pressing issue given the rapid spread of restorative justice worldwide at both national and international levels. In doing so it aims to build bridges between those concerned with the practical institutionalisation of restorative justice on the one hand, and those engaged in more theoretical aspects of penal development and analysis on the other. It offers conceptual tools and a theoretical framework to help make sense of these developments, reflecting expertise drawn from analysis of developments in Europe, North America and Australasia.
Categories: Social Science

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

For example, some understandings of restorative justice stress an almost retributive form of accountability to both the community and the offender while others stress the rehabilitative healing of the offender.

Author: Ivo Aertsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134016594

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 319

Exploring the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalization of restorative justice, this book builds bridges between those concerned with the practical and the more theoretical aspects of penal development.
Categories: Social Science

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

Institutionalizing Restorative Justice

This new book aims to explore the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalisation of restorative justice within existing penal and criminal justice systems, an increasingly pressing issue given ...

Author: Ivo Aertsen

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1137347799

Category:

Page: 334

View: 579

This new book aims to explore the key issues and debates surrounding the question of the incorporation and institutionalisation of restorative justice within existing penal and criminal justice systems, an increasingly pressing issue given the rapid spread of restorative justice worldwide at both national and international levels. In doing so it aims to build bridges between those concerned with the practical institutionalisation of restorative justice on the one hand, and those engaged in more theoretical aspects of penal development and analysis on the other. It offers conceptual tools and a theoretical framework to help make sense of these developments, reflecting expertise drawn from analysis of developments in Europe, North America and Australasia.
Categories:

Social Work and Restorative Justice

Social Work and Restorative Justice

The institutionalization of principles in restorative justice—a case study from the UK. In I. Aertsen, T. Daems, & L. Robert (Eds.), Institutionalizing restorativejustice (pp. 194–215). Cullumpton, Devon, UK: Willan Publishing.

Author: Elizabeth Beck

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199780749

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 524

Presents an innovative, synergistic practice model that will help social workers use restorative justice skills to facilitate healing and recovery in the families and communities that they serve.
Categories: Social Science

The Institutionalization of Restorative Justice

The Institutionalization of Restorative Justice

This study focuses on the institutionalization of restorative justice.

Author: Christopher M. Broughton

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:871827529

Category: Neoliberalism

Page:

View: 237

Restorative justice emerged in the western world as an alternative to the existing retributive penal system. An alternative that no longer relied on lawyers and judges to resolve criminal matters and community disputes, but rather empowered victims, offenders, and community members to do justice themselves. Throughout the past thirty years restorative justice has distanced itself from the traditional criminal justice system by focusing on repairing the harm caused by an offence rather than charging an offender for committing a crime against the state. This study focuses on the institutionalization of restorative justice. Specifically, this thesis conducts a content analysis of five Canada institutionalized restorative justice programs with the purpose of answering one primary research question. This question asks: are institutionalized restorative justice programs within Canada structured to reflect the core values of restorative justice? In order to answer this question, this thesis analyzes all the available textual documents pertaining to the five selected restorative justice programs for evidence of core restorative justice values and values associated with the co-opting institution, the retributive criminal justice system. This thesis concludes that yes, the five analyzed restorative programs are structured to reflect the core values of restorative justice. Although, the programs are also structured to reflect the core values of the current political ideology of neo-liberalism.
Categories: Neoliberalism

Reimagining Restorative Justice

Reimagining Restorative Justice

Institutionalizing restorative justice? Transforming criminal justice? A critical view on the Netherlands. In: I Aertsen, T Daems, and L Robert (eds), Institutionalizing Restorative Justice Cullompton: Willan Publishing.

Author: David O'Mahony

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781509901067

Category: Law

Page: 240

View: 807

"Restorative justice theory has largely failed to keep pace with the rapid expansion of restorative practices worldwide – indeed, it is remarkable how much support RJ has when so few advocates can even define what it is. As such, this insightful and comprehensive new contribution from two of the top scholars on the frontlines of restorative justice research is hugely welcome." Professor Shadd Maruna, Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Manchester "Reimagining Restorative Justice is a reflective and balanced reconsideration of restorative justice. It deftly sweeps across the large literature on the subject, putting it in perspective, seeing anew through its wide-angle lens. Empowerment and accountability provide a fertile framework for this richly reimagined justice." Professor John Braithwaite, Australian National University "David O'Mahony and Jonathan Doak have made a significant contribution to the confusing and over-complicated field of restorative justice theory. They do so through their use of empowerment theory to bring conceptual and operational clarity to the concepts of agency and accountability in restorative processes and outcomes. As a result they develop a convincing argument for face to face dialogue between victim and perpetrator within the core of the criminal justice system. Their emphasis upon ethical and skilful practice is a welcome riposte to the rapid spread of 'restorative justice lite' driven by managerialism and the need to cut costs." Tim Chapman, Lecturer at the University of Ulster. "O'Mahony and Doak convincingly argue that rapid developments in the practice of restorative interventions have outstripped restorative justice theory. They provide both an outstandingly helpful review of the literature and a fresh theoretical approach based on empowerment theory. Everyone seriously interested in restorative justice will want to reflect carefully on the authors' conclusions." Anthony Bottoms, Emeritus Wolfson Professor of Criminology at the University of Cambridge. In recent years, restorative-based interventions have expanded rapidly and are increasingly viewed as a legitimate, and even superior means of delivering justice. The result of this swift but piecemeal development has been that restorative justice practice has outpaced the development of restorative justice theory. This book takes up this challenge by 'reimagining' a new framework for the operation of restorative justice within criminal justice. In essence, it is contended that the core empowering values of 'agency' and 'accountability' provide a lens for reimagining how restorative justice works and the normative goals it ought to encompass.
Categories: Law

Women and Children as Victims and Offenders Background Prevention Reintegration

Women and Children as Victims and Offenders  Background  Prevention  Reintegration

Restorative justice programmes offer a process for resolving crime by focusing on redressing the harm done to victims, ... The process of institutionalizing restorative justice principles resists any easy generalization.

Author: Helmut Kury

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319284248

Category: Law

Page: 860

View: 264

This work compiles experiences and lessons learned in meeting the unique needs of women and children regarding crime prevention and criminal justice, in particular the treatment and social reintegration of offenders and serves as a cross-disciplinary work for academic and policy-making analyses and follow-up in developing and developed countries. Furthermore, it argues for a more humane and effective approach to countering delinquency and crime among future generations. In a world where development positively depends on the rule of law and the related investment security, two global trends may chart the course of development: urbanization and education. Urbanization will globalize the concepts of “justice” and “fairness”; education will be dominated by the urban mindset and digital service economy, just as a culture of lawfulness will. This work looks at crime prevention education as an investment in the sustainable quality of life of succeeding generations, and at those who pursue such crime prevention as the providers of much-needed skills in the educational portfolio. Adopting a reformist approach, this work collects articles with findings and recommendations that may be relevant to domestic and international policymaking, including the United Nations Studies and their educational value for the welfare of coming generations. The books address the relevant United Nations ideas by combining them with academic approaches. Guided by the Editors’ respective fields of expertise, and in full recognition of academic freedom and “organized scepticism”, it includes contributions by lawyers, criminologists, sociologists and other eminent experts seeking to bridge the gap between academic and policy perspectives, as appropriate, against the international background, including the United Nations developments.​ The second volume opens with Part IV, which presents articles on different kinds of crime prevention. The effectiveness of punishment and, in particular, imprisonment is examined by contrasting it with alternative sanctions and the following questions are raised: Does harsh punishment have a crime preventive effect? What are the side effects of imprisonment on the offenders and their families? Are alternatives, such as restorative justice or mediation, more effective and cheaper? Part V outlines proactive strategies of crime prevention, e.g. for potential sex offenders or in the domain of internet crime. Part VI envisions a more peaceful and inclusive society, which would be realized by improving the protection of women and children in their everyday life, and easing the reintegration of those who have become offenders. The importance of the role played by the UN in formulating these goals is underlined. The volume concludes with an epilogue of the 70th President of the United Nations Economic and Social Council, Martin Sajdik, and a post scriptum of the editors. p>
Categories: Law

Reconstructing Restorative Justice Philosophy

Reconstructing Restorative Justice Philosophy

Expert policy in juvenile justice: Patterns of claims making and issues of power in a program construction. Policy Studies Journal 23(4), p. 636. ... Tyler, T., Sherman, L., Strang, H., Barnes, G. Institutionalizing Restorative Justice 175.

Author: Theo Gavrielides

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317070184

Category: Social Science

Page: 382

View: 523

This book takes bold steps in forming much-needed philosophical foundations for restorative justice through deconstructing and reconstructing various models of thinking. It challenges current debates through the consideration and integration of various disciplines such as law, criminology, philosophy and human rights into restorative justice theory, resulting in the development of new and stimulating arguments. Topics covered include the close relationship and convergence of restorative justice and human rights, some of the challenges of engagement with human rights, the need for the recognition of the teachings of restorative justice at both the theoretical and the applied level, the Aristotelian theory on restorative justice, the role of restorative justice in schools and in police practice and a discussion of the humanistic African philosophy of Ubuntu. With international contributions from various disciplines and through the use of value based research methods, the book deconstructs existing concepts and suggests a new conceptual model for restorative justice. This unique book will be of interest to academics, researchers, policy-makers and practitioners.
Categories: Social Science

Doing Justice Better

Doing Justice Better

Ashworth, A. (1992a), Sentencing and Criminal Justice, (1st Edition), London: Butterworth. ... in I. Aertsen, T. Daems and L. Robert (eds), Institutionalizing Restorative Justice, Devon: Willan Publishing, pp.93117.

Author: David J. Cornwell

Publisher: Waterside Press

ISBN: 9781904380344

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 521

Longer prison sentences, overcrowded and ineffective regimes, high rates of re-offending, and eclectic penal policies are all fueling a crisis while failing to reduce offending. Doing Justice Better argues that the symptoms of this penal malaise are grounded in media sensationalism of crime and the need of politicians and their advisers to retain electoral credibility. Change is long overdue, but it requires a fresh contemporary penology based on restorative justice. Doing Justice Better challenges the status quo, asking key questions and placing victims of crime at the center of the criminal justice process. It is an uncompromising appraisal of the unique penal crisis affecting Britain and other Western-style democracies.
Categories: Social Science