Kinship in Ancient Athens

Kinship in Ancient Athens

The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources.

Author: S. C. Humphreys

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191092404

Category: History

Page: 1504

View: 388

The concept of kinship is at the heart of understanding not only the structure and development of a society, but also the day-to-day interactions of its citizens. Kinship in Ancient Athens aims to illuminate both of these issues by providing a comprehensive account of the structures and perceptions of kinship in Athenian society, covering the archaic and classical periods from Drakon and Solon up to Menander. Drawing on decades of research into a wide range of epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, and on S. C. Humphreys' expertise in the intersections between ancient history and anthropology, it not only puts a wealth of data at readers' fingertips, but subjects it to rigorous analysis. By utilizing an anthropological approach to reconstruct patterns of behaviour it is able to offer us an ethnographic 'thick description' of ancient Athenians' interaction with their kin that offers insights into a range of social contexts, from family life, rituals, and economic interactions, to legal matters, politics, warfare, and more. The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources. Volume I explores interactions and conflicts shaped by legal and economic constraints (adoption, guardianship, marriage, inheritance, property), as well as more optional relationships in the field of ritual (naming, rites de passage, funerals and commemoration, dedications, cultic associations) and political relationships, both formal (Assembly, Council) and informal (hetaireiai). Among several important and novel topics discussed are the sociological analysis of names and nicknames, the features of kin structure that advantaged or disadvantaged women in legal disputes, and the economic relations of dependence and independence between fathers and sons. Volume II deals with corporate groups recruited by patrifiliation and explores the role of kinship in these subdivisions of the citizen body: tribes and trittyes (both pre-Kleisthenic and Kleisthenic), phratries, genê, and demes. The section on the demes stresses variety rather than common features, and provides comprehensive information on location and prosopography in a tribally organized catalogue.
Categories: History

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Drawing on epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, 'Kinship in Ancient Athens' explores interactions between kin across a range of social contexts, from family life to legal matters, politics, and more.

Author: Sarah C. Humphreys

Publisher:

ISBN: 0191830208

Category: Athens (Greece)

Page:

View: 719

The concept of kinship is at the heart of understanding the structure of ancient Athenian society and the lives of its citizens. Drawing on epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, 'Kinship in Ancient Athens' explores interactions between kin across a range of social contexts, from family life to legal matters, politics, and more.
Categories: Athens (Greece)

Kinship and Politics in Athens 600 400 B C

Kinship and Politics in Athens  600 400 B C

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology.

Author: Robert J. Littman

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: STANFORD:36105041129292

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 369

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology. The political, social and religious systems of sixth and fifth century B.C. Athens are shown as functions of a patrilineal kinship system. In the earlier period the patrilineal kinship descent groups were the political system. As the city developed, the descent groups no longer defined the state, but their vitality persisted as politicians recruited their party members and allies from their own and allied kinship groups.
Categories: History

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Papazoglou, Fanoula, Les Villes de Macedoine a I'epoque Romaine, Athens: Ecole Francaise d'Athenes, 1988. ... The oeuvre of Greek dramatists amply demonstrates the crucial part played by kinship and family in ancient times.

Author: Nigel Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136787997

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 826

Examining every aspect of the culture from antiquity to the founding of Constantinople in the early Byzantine era, this thoroughly cross-referenced and fully indexed work is written by an international group of scholars. This Encyclopedia is derived from the more broadly focused Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, the highly praised two-volume work. Newly edited by Nigel Wilson, this single-volume reference provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the political, cultural, and social life of the people and to the places, ideas, periods, and events that defined ancient Greece.
Categories: History

The Birth of the Athenian Community

The Birth of the Athenian Community

Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a ...

Author: Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351621441

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 427

The Birth of the Athenian Community elucidates the social and political development of Athens in the sixth century, when, as a result of reforms by Solon and Cleisthenes (at the beginning and end of the sixth century, respectively), Athens turned into the most advanced and famous city, or polis, of the entire ancient Greek civilization. Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a gradually rising complexity, rather than a linear progression. The multidimensional social fabric of Athens was comprised of three major groups: the kinship community of the astoi, whose privileged status was due to their origins; the legal community of the politai, who enjoyed legal and social equality in the polis; and the political community of the demotai, or adult males with political rights. These communities only partially overlapped. Their evolving relationship determined the course of Athenian history, including Cleisthenes’ establishment of demokratia, which was originally, and for a long time, a kinship democracy, since it only belonged to qualified male astoi.
Categories: History

Kinship in Thucydides

Kinship in Thucydides

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture.

Author: Maria Fragoulaki

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199697779

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 246

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture. Offering a new interpretation of the Peloponnesian War and its historian, it focuses on the role of emotions and ethics in the context of political history and ethnic conflicts. Drawing on modern anthropological enquiries on kinship and the sociology of ethnicity and emotions, and on scholarly work on kinship diplomacy and Greek ethnicity, it arguesthat inter-communal kinship has a far more pervasive importance in Thucydides than has so far been acknowledged. Through new readings of the History, such topics as Thucydides' narrative technique, hischallenging silences, his interaction with other genres, and his intense engagement with Herodotus are dissected and discussed - offering a new appreciation of his unique contribution to historiography.
Categories: History

The Power of Individual and Community in Ancient Athens and Beyond

The Power of Individual and Community in Ancient Athens and Beyond

2017 'Proto-Indo-European kinship and society: kin terms', JIES45: 1–53. 2018 Kinship in Ancient Athens: An anthropological analysis, Oxford. in preparation 'Kinship in the Greek Bronze Age'. Janko, R. 1992 The Iliad. A commentary.

Author: Zosia Archibald

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781910589922

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 663

The pioneering ideas of John Kenyon Davies, one of the most significant Ancient Historians of the past half century, are celebrated in this collection of essays. A distinguished cast of contributors, who include Alain Bresson, Nick Fisher, Edward Harris, John Prag, Robin Osborne, and Sally Humphreys, focus tightly on the nexus of socio-political and economic problems that have preoccupied Davies since the publication of his defining work Athenian Propertied Families in 1971. The scope of Davies' interest has ranged widely in conceptual, and chronological, as well as geographical terms, and the essays here reflect many of his long-term concerns with the writing of Greek history, its methods and materials.
Categories: History

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity.

Author: Lee E. Patterson

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292739598

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 295

In ancient Greece, interstate relations, such as in the formation of alliances, calls for assistance, exchanges of citizenship, and territorial conquest, were often grounded in mythical kinship. In these cases, the common ancestor was most often a legendary figure from whom both communities claimed descent. In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity. He draws examples both from the literary and epigraphical records and shows the fundamental difference between the two. He also expands his study into the question of Greek credulity—how much of these founding myths did they actually believe, and how much was just a useful fiction for diplomatic relations? Of central importance is the authority the Greeks gave to myth, whether to elaborate narratives or to a simple acknowledgment of an ancestor. Most Greeks could readily accept ties of interstate kinship even when local origin narratives could not be reconciled smoothly or when myths used to explain the link between communities were only "discovered" upon the actual occasion of diplomacy, because such claims had been given authority in the collective memory of the Greeks.
Categories: History

Household Interests

Household Interests

These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions.

Author: Cheryl Anne Cox

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400864690

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 614

Household Interests is one of the first books to explore in-depth the nature of the Greek household (oikos) in classical Athens. Whereas the oikos traditionally has been defined as the household of the nuclear family in Greece, Cheryl Anne Cox reveals it as a much more fluid structure, taking care to distinguish between the concepts of "household" and "family." The legal basis of the typical elite household emerges as Cox describes marriage patterns or strategies among the families represented in Attic orations and funerary inscriptions: property interests were a strong motivating force, with the elite marrying within their kin, primarily through paternal lines in which property was transferred. The author ultimately shows that the household was not limited to "family" or kinspeople. Friends, neighbors, concubines or prostitutes, and slaves also shared in property interests and all could have a profound influence on the household. After first examining marriage patterns, Cox turns to inter-family relationships. Using anthropological sources and historical studies of European societies, she shows how property interest shaped often conflicted relations between parents and their children and among brothers, and yet it encouraged male charity toward sisters. Cox next considers how property transfer through adoption, guardianship, and remarriage, and the intervention of friends, concubines, and slaves, all contributed to expanding the boundaries of the household beyond kin. Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: History

Encyclopedia of the Ancient Greek World

Encyclopedia of the Ancient Greek World

Ionian cities such as ATHENS or MILETUS might have had four or more. ... Robert J. Littman, “Kinship in Athens,” Ancient Society 10 (1979): 5–31; S. C. Humphreys, “Kinship Patterns in the Athenian Courts,” Greek, Roman, and Byzantine ...

Author: David Sacks

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438110202

Category: History

Page: 433

View: 571

Discusses the people, places and events found in over 2,000 years of Greek civilization.
Categories: History

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

In this study of the political uses of perceived kinship from the Homeric age to Byzantium, Jones provides an unparalleled view of mythic belief in action and addresses fundamental questions about communal and national identity.

Author: Christopher Prestige Jones

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674505271

Category: History

Page: 193

View: 595

In this study of the political uses of perceived kinship from the Homeric age to Byzantium, Jones provides an unparalleled view of mythic belief in action and addresses fundamental questions about communal and national identity.
Categories: History

Citizenship in Classical Athens

Citizenship in Classical Athens

3.4 Descent and Inheritance Rights With this agenda in mind, I should like to sketch concisely how the kinship structure and transmission of inheritance worked in classical Athens and their significance for citizenship.

Author: Josine Blok

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108165730

Category: History

Page:

View: 719

What did citizenship really mean in classical Athens? It is conventionally understood as characterised by holding political office. Since only men could do so, only they were considered to be citizens, and the community (polis) has appeared primarily as the scene of men's political actions. However, Athenian law defined citizens not by political office, but by descent. Religion was central to the polis and in this domain, women played prominent public roles. Both men and women were called 'citizens'. On a new reading of the evidence, Josine Blok argues that for the Athenians, their polis was founded on an enduring bond with the gods. Laws anchored the polis' commitments to humans and gods in this bond, transmitted over time to male and female Athenians as equal heirs. All public offices, in various ways and as befitting gender and age, served both the human community and the divine powers protecting Athens.
Categories: History

The Law of Ancient Athens

The Law of Ancient Athens

If they do not exist, the law gives the right of kinship [anchisteian] to a third degree ofrelation [genei]: cousins on the father's side down to sons of first cousins [anepsiôn paidôn]. And if this degree of kinship too is lacking, ...

Author: David Phillips

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472035915

Category: History

Page: 558

View: 754

A topic fundamental to understanding the ancient world
Categories: History

The Ecology of the Ancient Greek World

The Ecology of the Ancient Greek World

... had kinship terms such as kasignetoi and kasioi which were used to designate not only siblings but also first cousins and sometimes other kinsmen . The Athenians were exceptional in not using these particular terms by the classical ...

Author: Research Fellow in Biomolecular Sciences Robert Sallares

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801426154

Category: History

Page: 588

View: 752

A pioneering study in historical population biology, this book offers the first comprehensive ecological history of the ancient Greek world. It proposes a new model for treating the relationship between the population and the land, centering on the distribution and abundance of living organisms.
Categories: History

Phoenix

Phoenix

Aristides: Davies, Athenian Propertied Families, 600–300 B.C., 48–49, 257. 6. Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens, 125; Humphreys (452) places Callias' marriage to Elpinice slightly later, 'probably in the late 480s', adding that it ...

Author: David Stuttard

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780674988279

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 322

"Fifty years before its golden age, Athens was just another city-state in Sparta's shadow. David Stuttard tells the story of the father and son who lifted Athens. Miltiades defeated the Persians at Marathon; Cimon drove them from Greece, revitalized the war-torn city, and moderated its foreign policy, creating the conditions for Athenian greatness"--
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Athenian Democracy

Athenian Democracy

My second concern with the relation of public and private spheres comes from work on kinship and is more ... The real trouble is the difficulty of discovering from ancient sources the meaning of family life to an ancient Athenian.

Author: Rhodes P. J. Rhodes

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9781474471985

Category: HISTORY

Page: 304

View: 377

Athens' democracy developed during the sixth and fifth centuries and continued into the fourth; Athens' defeat by Macedon in 322 began a series of alternations between democracy and oligarchy. The democracy was inseparably bound up with the ideals of liberty and equality, the rule of law, and the direct government of the people by the people. Liberty meant above all freedom of speech, the right to be heard in the public assembly and the right to speak one's mind in private. Equality meant the equal right of the male citizens (perhaps 60,000 in the fifth century, 30,000 in the fourth) to participate in the government of the state and the administration of the law. Disapproved of as mob rule until the nineteenth century, the institutions of Athenian democracy have become an inspiration for modern democratic politics and political philosophy. P. J. Rhodes's reader focuses on the political institutions, political activity, history, and nature of Athenian democracy and introduces some of the best British, American, German and French scholarship on its origins, theory and practice. Part I is devoted to political institutions: citizenship, the assembly, the law-courts, and capital punishment. Part II explores aspects of political activity: the demagogues and their relationship with the assembly, the manoeuvrings of the politicians, competitive festivals, and the separation of public from private life. Part III looks at three crucial points in the development of the democracy: the reforms of Solon, Cleisthenes and Ephialtes. Part IV considers what it was in Greek life that led to the development of democracy. Some of the authors adopt broad-brush approaches to major questions; others analyse a particular body of evidence in detail. Use is made of archaeology, comparison with other societies, the location of festivals in their civic context, and the need to penetrate behind what the classical Athenians made of their past.
Categories: HISTORY

Law Violence and Community in Classical Athens

Law  Violence  and Community in Classical Athens

25 Such a rhetorical approach to kinship can help make sense of the otherwise perplexing characteristics of Athenian inheritance litigation.26 Thus , when a litigant claims that according to a statute a person is unequivocally outside ...

Author: David Cohen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521388376

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 170

Using comparative anthropological and historical perspectives, this analysis of the legal regulation of violence in Athenian society challenges traditional accounts of the development of the legal process. It examines theories of social conflict and the rule of law as well as actual litigation.
Categories: History

The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens

The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens

The family was the basis of the Athenian polis, both structurally and conceptually. ... the household); and the second (genos) denoting the bilateral lines of connection that created a kinship web unique to each Athenian household.

Author: Jenifer Neils

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108754149

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 459

Named for a goddess, epicenter of the first democracy, birthplace of tragic and comic theatre, locus of the major philosophical schools, artistically in the vanguard for centuries, ancient Athens looms large in contemporary study of the ancient world. This Companion is a comprehensive introduction the city, its topography and monuments, inhabitants and cultural institutions, religious rituals and politics. Chapters link the religious, cultural, and political institutions of Athens to the physical locales in which they took place. Discussion of the urban plan, with its streets, gates, walls, and public and private buildings, provides readers with a thorough understanding of how the city operated and what people saw, heard, smelled, and tasted as they flowed through it. Drawing on the latest scholarship, as well as excavation discoveries at the Agora, sanctuaries, and cemeteries, the Companion explores how the city was planned, how it functioned, and how it was transformed from a democratic polis into a Roman city.
Categories: Social Science

Mediterranean Families in Antiquity

Mediterranean Families in Antiquity

Littman, R. 1979. “Kinship in Athens,” Ancient Society 10: 5–31. MacDowell, D. 1963. Athenian Homicide Law in the Age of the Orators. Manchester: Manchester University Press. MacDowell, D. 1978. The Law in Classical Athens.

Author: Sabine R. Huebner

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119143703

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 360

View: 499

This comprehensive study of families in the Mediterranean world spans the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity, and looks at families and households in various ancient societies inhabiting the regions around the Mediterranean Sea in an attempt to break down artificial boundaries between academic disciplines.
Categories: Literary Criticism