Language in Popular Fiction

Language in Popular Fiction

she had finished her novel earlier in the day , and decided to take up Alexander's invitation to use the library . Jane finishes her coffee ; Jane notices that it is almost ten o'clock ; Jane goes to the library to get another novel .

Author: Walter Nash

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000365528

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 178

View: 114

First published in 1990, Language in Popular Fiction was written to provide a comprehensive and illuminating look at the way language is used in thrillers and romantic fiction. The book examines the use of language across three interrelated levels: a level of verbal organisation, a level of narrative structure, and a level at which stylistic options and devices are related to notions of gender. It introduces ‘the protocol of pulchritude’ and makes use of detailed stylistic and linguistic analysis to investigate a wide range of ‘popfiction’ and ‘magfiction’. In doing so, it provokes serious reflection on popular fiction and its claims on the reader.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Language Science and Popular Fiction in the Victorian Fin de Si cle

Language  Science and Popular Fiction in the Victorian Fin de Si  cle

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Ferguson, Christine Language, science and popular fiction at the Victorian fin-de-siècle : the brutal tongue.¦(The nineteenth century series) 1.English fiction¦19th century¦History and ...

Author: Christine Ferguson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351923323

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 190

View: 986

Christine Ferguson's timely study is the first comprehensive examination of the importance of language in forming a crucial nexus among popular fiction, biology, and philology at the Victorian fin-de-siècle. Focusing on a variety of literary and non-literary texts, the book maps out the dialogue between the Victorian life and social sciences most involved in the study of language and the literary genre frequently indicted for causing linguistic corruption and debasement - popular fiction. Ferguson demonstrates how Darwinian biological, philological, and anthropological accounts of 'primitive' and animal language were co-opted into wider cultural debates about the apparent brutality of popular fiction, and shows how popular novelists such as Marie Corelli, Grant Allen, H.G. Wells, H. Rider Haggard, and Bram Stoker used their fantastic narratives to radically reformulate the relationships among language, thought, and progress that underwrote much of the contemporary prejudice against mass literary taste. In its alignment of scientific, cultural, and popular discourses of human language, Language, Science, and Popular Fiction in the Victorian Fin-de-Siècle stands as a corrective to assessments of best-selling fiction's intellectual, ideological, and aesthetic simplicity.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Narrative of Chinese and Western Popular Fiction

Narrative of Chinese and Western Popular Fiction

However, the written form of elite fiction and popular fiction materializes the flow of spoken language into a stable form, thus the receptors can detach themselves from the communicator, and browse titles and contents optionally, ...

Author: Yonglin Huang

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783662575758

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 219

This book presents a comprehensive and systematic study of the narrative history and narrative methods of Chinese and Western popular fiction from the perspectives of narratology, comparative literature, and art and literature studies by adopting the methodology of parallel comparison. The book is a pioneering work that systematically investigates the similarities and differences between Chinese and Western popular fiction, and traces the root causes leading to the differences. By means of narrative comparison, it explores the conceptual and spiritual correlations and differences between Chinese and Western popular fiction and, by relating them to the root causes of cultural spirit, allows us to gain an insight into the cultural heritage of different nations. The book is structured in line with a cause-and-effect logical sequence and moves from the macroscopic to the microscopic, from history to reality, and from theory to practice. The integration of macro-level theoretical studies and micro-level case studies is both novel and effective. This book was awarded Second Prize at the Sixth Outstanding Achievement Awards in Scientific Research for Chinese Institutions of Higher Learning (Humanities & Social Sciences, 2013).
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Barcelona Reader

The Barcelona Reader

Indeed, it is worth pausing briefly to reflect on the politics of language and popular fiction in Catalonia before engaging with the ways in which the city comes to be revealed in crime novels. Due to several centuries of persistent, ...

Author: Enric Bou

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781786948168

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 107

Over the last twenty years there has been a growing international interest in the city of Barcelona. This has been reflected in the academic world through a series of studies, courses, seminars, and publications. The Barcelona Reader hinges together a selection of the best academic articles, written in English, about the city, and its main elements of identity and interest: art, urban planning, history and social movements. The book includes scholarly essays about Barcelona that can be of interest to the student and the general public alike. It focuses on cultural representations of the city: the arts (including literature) provide a complex yet discontinuous portrait of the city, similar to a patchwork. The authors selected create a kaleidoscope of views and voices thus presenting a diverse yet inclusive Barcelona portrait. The Barcelona Reader offers a multifaceted assessment that will be essential reading for anyone interested in this iconic city.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Speech Writing and Thought Presentation in 19th Century Narrative Fiction

Speech  Writing  and Thought Presentation in 19th Century Narrative Fiction

The Origins of the English Novel, 1600–1740. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press. ... Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature 35(2): 250–267. Meyer, Susan. 2003. ... Language in Popular Fiction. London: Routledge.

Author: Beatrix Busse

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190920821

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 291

Reference to or quotation from someone's speech, thoughts, or writing is a key component of narrative. These reports further a narrative, make it more interesting, natural, and vivid, ask the reader to engage with it, and reflect historical cultural understandings of modes of discourse presentation. To a large extent, the way we perceive a story depends on the ways it presents discourse, and along with it, speech, writing, and thought. In this book, Beatrix Busse investigates speech, writing, and thought presentation in a corpus of 19th-century narrative fiction including Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Oliver Twist, and many others. At the intersection between corpus linguistics and stylistics, this book develops a new corpus-stylistic approach for systematically analyzing the different narrative strategies of discourse presentation in key pieces of 19th-century narrative fiction. Speech, Writing, and Thought Presentation in 19th-Century Narrative Fiction identifies diachronic patterns as well as unique authorial styles, and places them within their cultural-historical context. It also suggests ways for automatically identifying forms of discourse presentation, and shows that the presentation of characters' minds reflects an ideological as well as an epistemological concern about what cannot be reported, portrayed, or narrated. Through insightful interdisciplinary analysis, Busse demonstrates that discourse presentation fulfills the function of prospection and encapsulation, marks narrative progression, and shapes readers' expectations.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Fictions of Language and the Languages of Fiction

The Fictions of Language and the Languages of Fiction

... xxv; Trollope 1990:327) Free indirect discourse strongly correlates with internal focalization, whether in the early Jane Austen or the late Virginia Woolf and beyond, with standard applications in recent, more popular fiction.

Author: Monika Fludernik

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134872879

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 556

View: 853

Monika Fludernik presents a detailed analysis of free indirect discourse as it relates to narrative theory, and the crucial problematic of how speech and thought are represented in fiction. Building on the insights of Ann Banfield's Unspeakable Sentences, Fludernik radically extends Banfield's model to accommodate evidence from conversational narrative, non-fictional prose and literary works from Chaucer to the present. Fludernik's model subsumes earlier insights into the forms and functions of quotation and aligns them with discourse strategies observable in the oral language. Drawing on a vast range of literature, she provides an invaluable resource for researchers in the field and introduces English readers to extensive work on the subject in German as well as comparing the free indirect discourse features of German, French and English. This study effectively repositions the whole area between literature and linguistics, opening up a new set of questions in narrative theory.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Oxford IB Diploma Programme English A Language and Literature Course Companion

Oxford IB Diploma Programme  English A  Language and Literature Course Companion

They tried to compare the language used in “prize winning” texts (works that had won the The Man Booker Prize, for example) with bestselling works that were popular but had not won prizes (such as romance novels, suspense and detective ...

Author: Brian Chanen

Publisher: Oxford University Press - Children

ISBN: 9780198434597

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page:

View: 214

Developed in cooperation with the IB, this student-friendly, concept-based Course Book has been comprehensively updated to support all aspects of the new English A: Language and Literature syllabus, for first teaching in September 2019.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Teaching with Harry Potter

Teaching with Harry Potter

The pragmatic utilization of Popular Fiction in preparing second language students of English Literature may counter the opinions of the connoisseurs of English literature who frown upon Popular Fiction and state that it is inferior to ...

Author: Valerie Estelle Frankel

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476601229

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 236

The Harry Potter phenomenon created a surge in reading with a lasting effect on all areas of culture, especially education. Today, teachers across the world are harnessing the power of the series to teach history, gender studies, chemistry, religion, philosophy, sociology, architecture, Latin, medieval studies, astronomy, SAT skills, and much more. These essays discuss the diverse educational possibilities of J.K. Rowling’s books. Teachers of younger students use Harry and Hermione to encourage kids with disabilities or show girls the power of being brainy scientists. Students are reading fanfiction, splicing video clips, or exploring Rowling’s new website, Pottermore. Harry Potter continues to open new doors to learning.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Stylistics of Landscapes the Landscapes of Stylistics

The Stylistics of Landscapes  the Landscapes of Stylistics

Nature, Culture, and the Contemporary Indian Novel in English. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. Nash, W. 1990. Language in Popular Fiction. London: Routledge. Nayar, P. K. 2010. The postcolonial uncanny: The politics of dispossession in ...

Author: John Douthwaite

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company

ISBN: 9789027264602

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 897

In treating the topic of the landscapes of stylistics, this book provides a series of chapters which deal not only with physical landscapes but also with social, mental, historical portraits of places, people and society. The chapters demonstrate that all texts project a worldview, even when the content appears to be only a physical description of the external world. The implication is that texts attempt to produce specific effects on the reader determined by the author’s worldview. Contents and effects, (namely mental and emotional states, behaviours), are thus inseparable. Identifying those effects and how they are produced is an eminently cognitive operation. The chapters analyse a variety of linguistic devices and cognitive mechanisms employed in producing the text and accounting for the effects achieved. Though the majority of the chapters have a cognitive basis, a wide range of methodologies are employed, including ecostylistics, offering cutting-edge theoretical approaches teamed up with close reading. A further crucial feature of this collection is the selection of non-canonical texts, ranging from lesser-known texts in English to significant works in languages other than English, all of which are characterised by important social themes, thus emphasising the importance of critical appreciation as a means of self-empowerment.
Categories: Literary Criticism