Language Maven Strikes Again

Language Maven Strikes Again

Another important distinction is that in current English use maven is highly informal and somewhat humorous, ... You, Bill, are a language maven and a political pundit because you are considered a connoisseur of language and an ...

Author: William Safire

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 9780307800589

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 447

View: 134

Good news! America’s master wordsmith strikes again with a new collection of erudite, witty, provocative, sometimes barbed, frequently hilarious “On Language” columns. Published in The New York Times and syndicated in more than three hundred other newspapers, these opinions from the “Supreme Court of Current English Usage” cover everything from the bottom line on tycoonese and the accesses* of computerese to portmanteau words like televangelist and Draconomics (the language maven’s own plan for our bloated economy). Although Safire makes an admirable case for adverbs and adjectives, advocates of strong verbs will be heartened to hear that he also: pleads for the preservation of the subjunctive mood; delivers, hot off the college campus, the latest lingo in which ‘rents means parents and yesterday’s wimps are today’s squids; decries the brevity-is-next-to-godliness literary school; bids farewell to anxiety (it’s been replaced by trendy stress or swangst); noodles over such weighty geopolitical questions as “when an intercept of a fighter is a buzz”; bemoans the loss of roughage to fiber; and rides herd over the language spoken in Marlboro Country. More good news! Safire again spices his own wit and wisdom with correspondence from Lexicographic irregulars, those zealous readers and letter writers who reply to his columns with praise, scorn, corrections and nitpicks—anything to match wits with Super-maven. If You Could Look It Up and Take My Word for It occupy prominent spots in your bookcase, then Language Maven Strikes Again belongs there too. If they don’t, then begin with this Safire and work your way back. *That’s not a typo—that’s a pun.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Quoth the Maven

Quoth the Maven

More on Language from William Safire William Safire. ALSO BY WILLIAM SAFIRE LANGUAGE Coming to Terms Fumblerules Language Maven Strikes Again You Could Look It Up Take My Wordfor It I Stand Corrected What's the Good Word?

Author: William Safire

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780307799746

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 218

The Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist discusses contemporary figures of speech, from witty stories about expressions such as "kiss and tell" and "stab in the back" to the evolution of "read my lips." NOTE: This edition does not include illustrations.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Life of Language

The Life of Language

In his next book, Language Maven Strikes Again (1990), he gives as an example the noun watch, which originally sufficed as the word for a timepiece (derived from the idiom to keep watch or vigil and first recorded in Shakespeare's ...

Author: Sol Steinmetz

Publisher: Random House Reference

ISBN: 9780307496461

Category: Reference

Page: 400

View: 945

If time travelers from the nineteenth century dropped in on us, our strange vocabulary would shock them just as much as our TVs, cars, and computers. Society changes, and so does its word stock. The Life of Language reveals how pop culture, business, technology, and other forces of globalization expand and enrich the English language, forming thousands of new words every year. In this fascinating and jargon-free guide, lexicographers Kipfer and Steinmetz reconstruct the births of thousands of words, including infantries, poz, mobs, Soho, dinks, choo choos, frankenfoods, LOL, narcs and perps. · A word lover’s guide to etymology, written in a fun, informal, and accessible style · An excellent resource for vocabulary building; a word's root helps readers understand its meaning · Beautifully packaged paperback with French flaps From the Trade Paperback edition.
Categories: Reference

Dictionary of Jewish Usage

Dictionary of Jewish Usage

It was further popularized by the journalist William Safire , who called himself a “ language maven " and entitled two of his books Language Maven Strikes Again ( 1990 ) and Quoth the Maven ( 1993 ) . The word came from Yiddish meyvn ...

Author: Sol Steinmetz

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0742543870

Category: Religion

Page: 207

View: 808

Dictionary of Jewish Usage: A Guide to the Use of Jewish Terms is a unique and much needed resource to the way many Hebrew, Yiddish, and Aramaic words and meanings are used by English speakers. Sol Steinmetz draws upon his years of experience as an editor of dictionaries, as well as his lifelong study of Jewish history, traditions, and practices, to lead the reader through the essentially uncharted territory of Jewish usage. Dictionary of Jewish Usage clarifies the meanings of Jewish terms that have been absorbed into English, as well as the transliterated Hebrew terms from sacred texts that reflect differing pronunciations. The dictionary also explains terms that are often misused, sheds light on the meaning of clusters of terminology, and delineates the etymology and pronunciation of many words, making this an invaluable guide for anyone curious about Jewish usage.
Categories: Religion

Watching My Language

Watching My Language

ALSO BY WILLIAM SAFIRE LANGUAGE In Love with Norma Loquendi Quoth the Maven Coming to Terms Fumblerules Language Maven Strikes Again You Could Look It Up Take My Word for It I Stand Corrected What's the Good Word?

Author: William Safire

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780307799760

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 173

America's most entertaining language maven is back with more words to live by in his latest exploration of hot catchphrases, syntactical controversies, and other matters of national linguistic importance. Before you scratch that seven-year-itch, you might want to know where it came from. And before someone blurts, "You just don't get it," perhaps you should consult the Pulitzer Prize winning language columnist on the origins of that snappy feminist motto.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Garner s Modern English Usage

Garner s Modern English Usage

Safire, William. Language Maven Strikes Again. N.Y.: Doubleday. omas, Lewis. Et Cetera, Et Cetera: Notes of a Word-Watcher. Boston: Little, Brown & Co. 1991 Aitchison, Jean. Language Change: Progress or Decay? Cambridge: Cambridge Univ.

Author: Bryan Garner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190491499

Category: Reference

Page: 1008

View: 222

With more than a thousand new entries and more than 2,300 word-frequency ratios, the magisterial fourth edition of this book-now renamed Garner's Modern English Usage (GMEU)-reflects usage lexicography at its finest. Garner explains the nuances of grammar and vocabulary with thoroughness, finesse, and wit. He discourages whatever is slovenly, pretentious, or pedantic. GMEU is the liveliest and most compulsively readable reference work for writers of our time. It delights while providing instruction on skillful, persuasive, and vivid writing. Garner liberates English from two extremes: both from the hidebound "purists" who mistakenly believe that split infinitives and sentence-ending prepositions are malfeasances and from the linguistic relativists who believe that whatever people say or write must necessarily be accepted. The judgments here are backed up not just by a lifetime of study but also by an empirical grounding in the largest linguistic corpus ever available. In this fourth edition, Garner has made extensive use of corpus linguistics to include ratios of standard terms as compared against variants in modern print sources. No other resource provides as comprehensive, reliable, and empirical a guide to current English usage. For all concerned with writing and editing, GMEU will prove invaluable as a desk reference. Garner illustrates with actual examples, cited with chapter and verse, all the linguistic blunders that modern writers and speakers are prone to, whether in word choice, syntax, phrasing, punctuation, or pronunciation. No matter how knowledgeable you may already be, you're sure to learn from every single page of this book.
Categories: Reference

No Uncertain Terms

No Uncertain Terms

OTHER BOOKS BY WILLIAM SAFIRE LANGUAGE On Language In Love with Norma Loquendi Quoth the Maven Coming to Terms Fumblerules Language Maven Strikes Again You Could Look It Up Take My Word for It I Stand Corrected What's the Good Word ?

Author: William Safire

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743258126

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 344

Examines and provides comments on language trends while tracing the origins of timely words and phrases that discuss such topics as technology, entertainment, and everyday life.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations

The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations

Language Maven Strikes Again . New York : Doubleday , 1990 . Take My Word for It . New York : Times Books , 1986 . .. I Stand Corrected . New York : Avon Books , 1984 . What's the Good Word ? New York : Times Books , 1982 . On Language ...

Author: Charles Harrington Elster

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 061842315X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 522

View: 981

This guide to the most commonly mispronounced words in the English language is revised and expanded with one hundred new entries including words like al-Qaeda, machismo, curriculum vitae, and Pulitzer.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

How Not to Write The Essential Misrules of Grammar

How Not to Write  The Essential Misrules of Grammar

Other Books by William Safire LANGUAGE OH Language In Lave with Norma Loquendi Quoth the Maven Coming to Terms Fumblerules Language Maven Strikes Again You Could Look It Up Take My Word for It I Stand Corrected What's the Good Word?

Author: William Safire

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393351361

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 160

View: 389

These fifty humorous misrules of grammar will open the eyes of writers of all levels to fine style. How Not to Write is a wickedly witty book about grammar, usage, and style. William Safire, the author of the New York Times Magazine column "On Language," homes in on the "essential misrules of grammar," those mistakes that call attention to the major rules and regulations of writing. He tells you the correct way to write and then tells you when it is all right to break the rules. In this lighthearted guide, he chooses the most common and perplexing concerns of writers new and old. Each mini-chapter starts by stating a misrule like "Don't use Capital letters without good REASON." Safire then follows up with solid and entertaining advice on language, grammar, and life. He covers a vast territory from capitalization, split infinitives (it turns out you can split one if done meaningfully), run-on sentences, and semi-colons to contractions, the double negative, dangling participles, and even onomatopoeia. Originally published under the title Fumblerules.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage

A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage

Language Maven Strikes Again . New Garner , Bryan A. Guidelines for Drafting and EditYork : Doubleday , 1990 . ing Court Rules . Washington , D.C .: Administrative Safire , William . Coming to Terms . New York : Dou- Office of the U.S. ...

Author: Bryan A. Garner

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195142365

Category: Law

Page: 953

View: 991

A comprehensive guide to legal style and usage, with practical advice on how to write clear, jargon-free legal prose. Includes style tips as well as definitions.
Categories: Law