Life Writing in the Anthropocene

Life Writing in the Anthropocene

How does the obituary function present itself in Anthropocene life writing, asks Bristow, and how will it transform existing rhetorical categories and genres, such as the elegy? This question of how the Anthropocene shapes genres and ...

Author: Jessica White

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000396836

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 779

Life Writing in the Anthropocene is a collection of timely and original approaches to the question of what constitutes a life, how that life is narrated, and what lives matter in autobiography studies in the Anthropocene. This era is characterised by the geoengineering impact of humans, which is shaping the planet’s biophysical systems through the combustion of fossil fuels, production of carbon, unprecedented population growth, and mass extinction. These developments threaten the rights of humans and other-than-humans to just and sustainable lives. In exploring ways of representing life in the Anthropocene, this work articulates innovative literary forms such as ecobiography (the representation of a human subject's entwinement with their environment), phytography (writing the lives of plants), and ethological poetics (the study of nonhuman poetic forms), providing scholars and writers with innovative tools to think and write about our strange new world. In particular, its recognition on plant life reminds us of how human lives are entwined with vegetal lives. The creative and critical essays in this book, shaped by a number of Antipodean authors, bear witness to a multitude of lives and deaths. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Life Writing in the Anthropocene

Life Writing in the Anthropocene

The creative and critical essays in this book, shaped by a number of Antipodean authors, bear witness to a multitude of lives and deaths. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies.

Author: Taylor & Francis Group

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0367704331

Category:

Page: 296

View: 681

Life Writing in the Anthropocene is a collection of timely and original approaches to the question of what constitutes a life, how that life is narrated, and what lives matter in autobiography studies in the Anthropocene. This era is characterised by the geoengineering impact of humans, which is shaping the planet's biophysical systems through the combustion of fossil fuels, production of carbon, unprecedented population growth, and mass extinction, threatens the rights of humans and other-than-humans to just and sustainable lives. In exploring ways of representing life in the Anthropocene, this work articulates innovative literary forms such as ecobiography (the intertwining of a human subject with their environment), phytography (writing the lives of plants) and ethological poetics (the study of nonhuman poetic forms), providing scholars and writers with innovative tools to think and write about our strange new world. In particular, its recognition on plant life reminds us of how human lives are entwined with vegetal lives. The creative and critical essays in this book, shaped by a number of Antipodean authors, bear witness to a multitude of lives and deaths. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of a/b: Auto/Biography Studies.
Categories:

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene

In Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene, edited by Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, Nils Bubandt, Elaine Gan, and Heather Anne Swanson, 169–175. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

Author: Ina Batzke

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030779733

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 104

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene is a timely collection of insightful contributions that negotiate how the genre of life writing, traditionally tied to the human perspective and thus anthropocentric qua definition, can provide adequate perspectives for an age of ecological disasters and global climate change. The volume’s eight chapters illustrate the aptness of life writing and life writing studies to critically reevaluate the role of “the human” vis-à-vis non-human others while remaining mindful of persisting inequalities between humans regarding who causes and who suffers damage in the Anthropocene age. The authors in this collection not only expand the toolbox of life writing studies by engaging with critical insights from the fields of posthumanism and ecocriticism, but, in turn, also enrich those fields by offering unique approaches to contemplate the responsibility of humans for as well as their relational existence in the posthuman Anthropocene.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene

The authors in this collection not only expand the toolbox of life writing studies by engaging with critical insights from the fields of posthumanism and ecocriticism, but, in turn, also enrich those fields by offering unique approaches to ...

Author: Ina Batzke

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 3030779726

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 268

View: 974

Life Writing in the Posthuman Anthropocene is a timely collection of insightful contributions that negotiate how the genre of life writing, traditionally tied to the human perspective and thus anthropocentric qua definition, can provide adequate perspectives for an age of ecological disasters and global climate change. The volume’s eight chapters illustrate the aptness of life writing and life writing studies to critically reevaluate the role of “the human” vis-à-vis non-human others while remaining mindful of persisting inequalities between humans regarding who causes and who suffers damage in the Anthropocene age. The authors in this collection not only expand the toolbox of life writing studies by engaging with critical insights from the fields of posthumanism and ecocriticism, but, in turn, also enrich those fields by offering unique approaches to contemplate the responsibility of humans for as well as their relational existence in the posthuman Anthropocene.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Body Politics of Glocal Social Work

The Body Politics of Glocal Social Work

11) write about how shifting movements between genres such as the literary essay, a scientific report, and an an- thropological ... White and Whitlock (2021) propose alternative words for the 'auto' in life writing in the Anthropocene, ...

Author: Mona B. Livholts

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000824384

Category: Social Science

Page: 169

View: 614

This book shapes a situated body politics to re-think, re-write, and de-colonise social work as a post-anthropocentric discipline headed towards glocalisation, where human and non-human embodiments and agencies are entangled in glocal environmental worlds. It critically and creatively examines how social work can be theorised, practised, and written in renewed ways through dialogical and transdisciplinary practices. This book is composed of eight essayistic spaces, envisioning social work through embodied, glocal, and earthly entanglements. By drawing on research-based knowledge, autobiographical notes, stories, poetry, photographs, and an art exhibition in social work education, these essays provide readers with analysis and strategies that are useful for research, education, and practice as well as life-long learning. The book constitutes key literature for researchers, educators, practitioners, and activists in social work, sociology, architecture, art and creative writing, feminist and postcolonial studies, human geography, and post-anthropocentric philosophy. It offers the readers sustainable ways to re-think and re-write social work towards a glocal- and post-anthropocentric more-than-human worldview.
Categories: Social Science

Autofiction and Cultural Memory

Autofiction and Cultural Memory

Ina Batzke, Lea Espinoza Garrido and Linda M. Hess have gone even further, suggesting that like the notion of the Anthropocene, the category of life writing is implicit in the diffusion of a species-ist outlook on the state of the ...

Author: Hywel Dix

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000854282

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 111

View: 682

Autofiction and Cultural Memory breaks new ground in autofiction research by showing how it gives postcolonial writers a means of bearing witness to past cultural or political struggles, and hence of contributing to new forms of cultural memory. Most discussion of autofiction has treated it as an individualistic form, dealing with the personal growth of its authors. In doing so, it privileges narratives of private development over those of social commitment and accords with Western concepts of ownership and authorship. By contrast, Hywel Dix shows how a variety of writers outside the Western world have used the techniques of autofiction in a different way, placing themselves on the side lines of their own stories to show solidarity with struggles against imperialism and tyranny. Drawing on examples from Algeria, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, the Americas, India and Turkey, Dix presents autofiction as a form which combines the life stories of authors with the collective struggles of their societies to restore to view historical injustices that have been marginalised and forgotten. By contributing to new forms of cultural memory, autofiction raises important questions about what we choose to remember and what we value in the present. This book will be of interest to anyone working in postcolonial studies, world literature, trauma studies, autobiography, life writing or social justice.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed

After Sarah read them, she pointed out that in the Anthropocene, there are no disinterested observers; there are only participants. She explained that when people write reviews, they are really writing a kind of memoir—here's what my ...

Author: John Green

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781473594036

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 256

View: 138

A deeply moving and mind-expanding collection of personal essays in the first ever work of non-fiction from #1 internationally bestselling author John Green The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. In this remarkable symphony of essays adapted and expanded from his ground-breaking, critically acclaimed podcast, John Green reviews different facets of the human-centered planet - from the QWERTY keyboard and Halley's Comet to Penguins of Madagascar - on a five-star scale. Complex and rich with detail, the Anthropocene's reviews have been praised as 'observations that double as exercises in memoiristic empathy', with over 10 million lifetime downloads. John Green's gift for storytelling shines throughout this artfully curated collection about the shared human experience; it includes beloved essays along with six all-new pieces exclusive to the book.
Categories: Literary Collections

The Divided States

The Divided States

Life: Writing and Rights in the Anthropocene.” a/b: Auto/Biography Studies 35, no.1 (2020): 1–12. Whitehead, Colson. The Nickel Boys. New York: Penguin Random House, 2019. Whitlock, Gillian. “Protection.” In We Shall Bear Witness: Life ...

Author: Laura J. Beard

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 9780299338800

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 355

View: 730

What is an “American” identity? The tension between populism and pluralism, between homogeneity and heterogeneity, has marked the United States since its inception. In The Divided States, leading scholars and critics argue that the US is, and has always been, a site where multiple national identities intersect in productive and challenging ways. Scrutinizing conflicting nationalisms and national identities, the authors ask, Whose stories get told and whose do not? Who or what promotes the idea of a unified national identity in the United States? How is the notion of a unified national identity disrupted? What myths and stories bind the US together? How representative are these stories? What are the counternarratives? And, if the idea of national homogeneity is a fallacy, what does tie us together as a nation? Working across auto/biography studies, American studies, and human geography—all of which deal with the current interest in competing narratives, “alternative facts,” and accountability—the essays engage in and contribute to critical conversations in classrooms, scholarship, and the public sphere. The authors draw from a variety of fields, including anthropology; class analysis; critical race theory; diasporic, refugee, and immigration studies; disability studies; gender studies; graphic and comix studies; Indigenous studies; linguistics; literary studies; sociology; and visual culture. And the genres under scrutiny include diary, epistolary communication, digital narratives, graphic narratives, literary narratives, medical narratives, memoir, oral history, and testimony. This fresh and theoretically engaged volume will be relevant to anyone interested in the multiplicity of voices that make up the US national narrative.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Text and Image in Women s Life Writing

Text and Image in Women s Life Writing

This series features books that address key concepts and subjects in life writing, with an emphasis on new and emergent ... and the processes and effects of the Anthropocene, including environmental subjects where lives may be ...

Author: Valérie Baisnée-Keay

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030848750

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 866

This book examines the relationship between words and images in various life-writing works produced by nineteenth to twenty-first century American and British women. It addresses the politics of images in women’s life writing, contending that the presence or absence of images is often strategic. Including a range of different forms of life writing, chapters draw on traditional (auto)biographies, travel narratives, memoirs, diaries, autofiction, cancer narratives, graphic memoirs, artistic installations, quilts and online performances, as life writing moves from page to screen and other media. The book explores a wide range of women who have crossed the boundary between text and image: painters who have become writers, novelists who have become painters, writers who hesitate between images and words, models who seize the camera, and artists who use the frame as a page.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Racial Dimensions of Life Writing in Education

Racial Dimensions of Life Writing in Education

(2017) in Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet: Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene remind us, though these frames often “deserve some separation, monsters and ghosts cannot be segregated” (p. G3). We agree that these mystifying ...

Author: Lucy E. Bailey

Publisher: IAP

ISBN: 9798887300382

Category: Education

Page: 317

View: 523

This collection presents life writing projects that explore or represent the racial dimensions of life writing research in diverse educational spaces using diverse methodologies and inquiry approaches. We believe this collection is long overdue. To quote Melva R. Grant and Signe E. Kastberg’s succinct phrasing (this volume) “racialized inquiry matters.” While some rich texts explore the racial aspects and anti-racist potential of social science research (Blee, 2018; Lopez & Parker, 2003; Sefa Dei & Johal, 2005; Twine & Warren, 2000), and include examples from educational contexts, there are no collections which focus on the intersections of life writing inquiry as educative projects that highlight racial dimensions of the work and lives under study. Drawing from Toni Morrison’s enduring wisdom, a visionary writer whose work has explored the racial dimensions of culture and lived experience, we centralize race in life writing in this collection rather than obscuring it or leaving it as a lurking, absent presence in the craft. Racial Dimensions of Life Writing Research offers a wealth of ideas and perspectives from which scholars, teachers, and students can draw to support their work. The 14 chapters in this collection attend to national, international, and local concerns, include varied theoretical and methodological approaches, and reflect a range of ethnic and racial heritages. Chapters consider practical, theoretical, ethical, and educational issues involved in projects concerning under-represented educational actors important for the terrain of life writing. The authors include established and emerging scholars— university researchers, directors, and professors, academic advisors, graduate and undergraduate students, activists, and former elementary and secondary school teachers. It is our hope that this volume will spark conversation, debate, and reflection and will be a valuable resource that inspires scholarship about how race and its intersections shape the life-writing inquiry process. ENDORSEMENT: "This is an exceptionally important volume interrogating intersections of race, racism and life writing. Authors recenter life narrative as a necessary anchor for studying, teaching about, and learning through complex racial dynamics. This book should be read by any of us serious about studying and advancing knowledge on race and writing." — Richard Milner, Vanderbilt University
Categories: Education