Perfect Motherhood

Perfect Motherhood

For another example of the steps mothers could take to train their children, see Grace Langdon, “Toilet Training,” ... Jacquelyn S. Litt, Medicalized Motherhood: Perspectives from the Lives of African-American and Jewish Women (New ...

Author: Rima Dombrow Apple

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813538433

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 209

View: 762

Parenting today is virtually synonymous with worry. We want to ensure that our children are healthy, that they get a good education, and that they grow up to be able to cope with the challenges of modern life. In our anxiety, we are keenly aware of our inability to know what is best for our children. When should we toilet train? What is the best way to encourage a fussy child to eat? How should we protect our children from disease and injury? Before the nineteenth century, maternal instinct, a mother's "natural know-how" was considered the only tool necessary for effective childrearing. Over the past two hundred years, however, science has entered the realm of motherhood in increasingly significant ways. With each generation, psychologists, health experts, and physicians introduce new theories about the most appropriate way to raise children. These ideas are circulated through a wealth of public health pamphlets, books, popular magazines, and even films. In Perfect Motherhood, Rima D. Apple shows how the growing belief that mothers need to be savvy about the latest scientific directives has shifted the role of childrearer away from the mother and toward the professional establishment. Apple, however, does not argue that mothers' increasing reliance on expert advice has changed childrearing for the worse. Instead, she shows how most women today are finding ways to negotiate among the abundance of scientific recommendations, their own knowledge, and the reality of their daily lives. - Publisher.
Categories: Family & Relationships

Medical Imperialism in French North Africa

Medical Imperialism in French North Africa

In many ways, the exclusion of Muslim women only increased the social prestige of medicalized motherhood among Jewish women who sought to define themselves as separate from “Arab” practices and amenable to French normative cultural ...

Author: Richard C. Parks

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496202895

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 978

French-colonial Tunisia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries witnessed shifting concepts of identity, including varying theories of ethnic essentialism, a drive toward “modernization,” and imperialist interpretations of science and medicine. As French colonizers worked to realize ideas of a “modern” city and empire, they undertook a program to significantly alter the physical and social realities by which the people of Tunisia lived, often in ways that continue to influence life today. Medical Imperialism in French North Africa demonstrates the ways in which diverse members of the Jewish community of Tunis received, rejected, or reworked myriad imperial projects devised to foster the social, corporeal, and moral “regeneration” of their community. Buttressed by the authority of science and medicine, regenerationist schemes such as urban renewal projects and public health reforms were deployed to destroy and recast the cultural, social, and political lives of Jewish colonial subjects. Richard C. Parks expands on earlier scholarship to examine how notions of race, class, modernity, and otherness shaped these efforts. Looking at such issues as the plasticity of identity, the collaboration and contention between French and Tunisian Jewish communities, Jewish women’s negotiation of social power relationships in Tunis, and the razing of the city’s Jewish quarter, Parks fills the gap in current literature by focusing on the broader transnational context of French actions in colonial Tunisia.
Categories: History

Mother

Mother

240, 242–4; Margaret Charles Smith and Linda Holmes, Listen to Me Good: The Life Story of an Alabama Midwife (Columbus, 1996), quotation at 155 ('raised'); Jacqueline S. Litt, Medicalized Motherhood: Perspectives from the Lives of ...

Author: Sarah Knott

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9780241972755

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 384

View: 768

An innovative and intimate history of maternity When acclaimed historian Sarah Knott became pregnant, she started looking for a history of motherhood - only to find that no such book exists. For centuries, historians have concerned themselves with wars and revolutions, not the everyday details of carrying and caring for a baby. These details matter: they shape our feelings and give structure to our hours. But they leave little historical trace. Much to do with becoming a mother, past or present, is lost or forgotten. Using the arc of her own experience, from miscarriage to the birth and early babyhood of her two children, Sarah Knott explores the changing traditions, experiences and cultural implications of motherhood. Drawing on diaries and letters, paintings and songs, Mother vividly brings to life the stories of both ordinary and extraordinary women - from the piercing cry of a South Carolina field slave to the triumphant smile of a royal mistress pregnant with a king's first son - to create a moving depiction of a universal and endlessly various human experience.
Categories: Family & Relationships

Mother Is a Verb

Mother Is a Verb

Apple, Perfect Motherhood, 25 (Stanton, Combe), 22 (constant reading); Litt, Medicalized Motherhood, 127 (Marion Marks). Angela Davis, Modern Motherhood: Women and Family in England, c. 1945–2000 (Manchester, UK, 2012), 128–32, ...

Author: Sarah Knott

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 9780374714055

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 273

Welcome to a work of history unlike any other. Mothering is as old as human existence. But how has this most essential experience changed over time and cultures? What is the history of maternity—the history of pregnancy, birth, the encounter with an infant? Can one capture the historical trail of mothers? How? In Mother Is a Verb, the historian Sarah Knott creates a genre all her own in order to craft a new kind of historical interpretation. Blending memoir and history and building from anecdote, her book brings the past and the present viscerally alive. It is at once intimate and expansive, lyrical and precise. As a history, Mother Is a Verb draws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, from those of Cree and Ojibwe women to tenant farmers in Appalachia; from enslaved people on South Carolina rice plantations to tenement dwellers in New York City and London’s East End. She pores over diaries, letters, court records, medical manuals, items of clothing. And she explores and documents her own experiences. As a memoir, Mother Is a Verb becomes a method of asking new questions and probing lost pasts in order to historicize the smallest, even the most mundane of human experiences. Is there a history to interruption, to the sound of an infant’s cry, to sleeplessness? Knott finds answers not through the telling of grand narratives, but through the painstaking accumulation of a trellis of anecdotes. And all the while, we can feel the child on her hip.
Categories: Social Science

Feminist Science Studies

Feminist Science Studies

This chapter approaches women's relations to scientific authority through a feminist standpoint approach, searching out how actual women engaged and produced the new tenets of medicalized motherhood. Analytically, this means focusing on ...

Author: Maralee Mayberry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000082814

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 383

This essential text contains contributions from a wide range of fields and provides role models for feminist scientists. Including chapters from scientists and feminist scholars, the book presents a wide range of feminist science studies scholarship-from autobiographical narratives and experimental and theoretical projects, to teaching tools and courses and community-based projects.
Categories: Social Science

Abortion Motherhood and Mental Health

Abortion  Motherhood  and Mental Health

Medicalizing Reproduction in the United States and Great Britain Ellie Lee. teenagers are more likely to abstain from having sex , or because they have become more likely to use contraception when they do , is a controversial subject .

Author: Ellie Lee

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 0202364046

Category: Social Science

Page: 293

View: 376

Whatever reproductive choices women make--whether they opt to end a pregnancy through abortion or continue to term and give birth--they are considered to be at risk of suffering serious mental health problems. According to opponents of abortion in the United States, potential injury to women is a major reason why people should consider abortion a problem. On the other hand, becoming a mother can also be considered a big risk. This fine, well-balanced book is about how people represent the results of reproductive choices. It examines how and why pregnancy and its various outcomes have come to be discussed this way. The author's interest in the medicalization of reproduction--its representation as a mental health problem--first arose in relation to abortion. There is a very clear contrast between the construction of women who have abortions, implied by moralized argument against abortion, and the construction that results when the case against abortion focuses on its effects on women's mental health. Lee argues that claims that connect abortion with mental illness have been limited in their influence, but this is not to suggest that they have not become a focus for discussion and have had no impact. The limits to such claims about abortion do not, by any means, suggest limits to the process of the medicalization of pregnancy more broadly, that is, a process of demedicalization. The final theme of Ellie Lee's book is the selective medicalization of reproduction. Centering on the claim that abortion can create a post abortion syndrome, the author examines the "medicalization" of the abortion problem on both sides of the Atlantic. Lee points to contrasts in legal and medical dimensions of the abortion issue that make for some important differences, but argues that in both the United States and Great Britain, the post-abortion-syndrome claim constitutes an example of the limits to medicalization and the return to the theme of motherhood as a psychological ordeal. Lee makes the case for looking to the social dimensions of mental health problems to account for and understand debates about what makes women ill. Ellie Lee is research fellow in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Southampton, Highfield, United Kingdom.
Categories: Social Science

Medical Sociology on the Move

Medical Sociology on the Move

Thus, books with titles like Medicalized Motherhood (Litt 2000) and Babies for the Nation: The Medicalization of Motherhood in Quebec (Baillargeon 2009) do not mean that motherhood has become a disease or disorder, but rather that ...

Author: William C. Cockerham

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400761933

Category: Social Science

Page: 267

View: 618

This book provides readers with a single source reviewing and updating sociological theory in medical or health sociology. The book not only addresses the major theoretical approaches in the field today, it also identifies the future directions these theories are likely to take in explaining the social processes affecting health and disease. Many of the chapters are written by leading medical sociologists who feature the use of theory in their everyday work, including contributions from the original theorists of fundamental causes, health lifestyles, and medicalization. Theories focusing on both agency and structure are included to provide a comprehensive account of this important area in medical sociology.
Categories: Social Science

Mother s Milk

Mother s Milk

Jacquelyn Litt's study of Jewish and African-American mothers' experiences of medicalized motherhood in this century demonstrates that bottle feeding was, at least for the Jewish women in the study, a way to construct an identity as a ...

Author: Bernice L. Hausman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135208264

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 790

Mother's Milk examines why nursing a baby is an ideologically charged experience in contemporary culture. Drawing upon medical studies, feminist scholarship, anthropological literature, and an intimate knowledge of breastfeeding itself, Bernice Hausman demonstrates what is at stake in mothers' infant feeding choices--economically, socially, and in terms of women's rights. Breastfeeding controversies, she argues, reveal social tensions around the meaning of women's bodies, the authority of science, and the value of maternity in American culture. A provocative and multi-faceted work, Mother's Milk will be of interest to anyone concerned with the politics of women's embodiment.
Categories: Social Science

Modern Motherhood

Modern Motherhood

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “'The Living Mother of a Living Child': Midwifery and Mortality in PostRevolutionary New England,” in Mothers and Motherhood, 175; ... Litt, Medicalized Motherhood, 72, 117–118; Natalia Molina,FittoBe Citizens?

Author: Jodi Vandenberg-Daves

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813573137

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 194

How did mothers transform from parents of secondary importance in the colonies to having their multiple and complex roles connected to the well-being of the nation? In the first comprehensive history of motherhood in the United States, Jodi Vandenberg-Daves explores how tensions over the maternal role have been part and parcel of the development of American society. Modern Motherhood travels through redefinitions of motherhood over time, as mothers encountered a growing cadre of medical and psychological experts, increased their labor force participation, gained the right to vote, agitated for more resources to perform their maternal duties, and demonstrated their vast resourcefulness in providing for and nurturing their families. Navigating rigid gender role prescriptions and a crescendo of mother-blame by the middle of the twentieth century, mothers continued to innovate new ways to combine labor force participation and domestic responsibilities. By the 1960s, they were poised to challenge male expertise, in areas ranging from welfare and abortion rights to childbirth practices and the confinement of women to maternal roles. In the twenty-first century, Americans continue to struggle with maternal contradictions, as we pit an idealized role for mothers in children’s development against the social and economic realities of privatized caregiving, a paltry public policy structure, and mothers’ extensive employment outside the home. Building on decades of scholarship and spanning a wide range of topics, Vandenberg-Daves tells an inclusive tale of African American, Native American, Asian American, working class, rural, and other hitherto ignored families, exploring sources ranging from sermons, medical advice, diaries and letters to the speeches of impassioned maternal activists. Chapter topics include: inventing a new role for mothers; contradictions of moral motherhood; medicalizing the maternal body; science, expertise, and advice to mothers; uplifting and controlling mothers; modern reproduction; mothers’ resilience and adaptation; the middle-class wife and mother; mother power and mother angst; and mothers’ changing lives and continuous caregiving. While the discussion has been part of all eras of American history, the discussion of the meaning of modern motherhood is far from over.
Categories: Social Science

Motherhood Online

Motherhood Online

Medicalized Motherhood: Perspectives from the Lives of African-American and Jewish Women. NJ: Rutgers University Press. Miyata, Kakuko. 2002. Social Support for Japanese Mothers Online and Offline. The Internet in Everyday Life, ...

Author: Michelle Moravec

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443831390

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 330

View: 692

It may take a village to raise a child, but increasingly that means a virtual village. While the media may focus on the so-called “mommy wars,” and babyrazzi follow every move of celebrity moms, millions of mothers world-wide are creating online communities. These mommy groups provide an alternative context for understanding how women construct modern motherhood together. Motherhood Online explores the mutifaceted lives that moms live online. Ranging from longitudinal studies to focused explorations of identity, and the newest community context, mommy blogs, this book documents the millions of mommies who have found an outlet online. Whether centered on region, religion, race, or something else altogether, these communities of mothers are creating a new space for mom and allowing many women to maintain a grasp, however tenuous, on sanity in this crazy-making world of modern motherhood.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines