Medium Mark A Whippet

Medium Mark A Whippet

The Whippet was involved in several well-known incidents that will be presented in this volume, including the clash at Cachy on April 24, 1918, the actions of the 6th Battalion tank known as "Musical Box" on August 8, 1918, and Sewell's ...

Author: David Fletcher

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN: 1782003983

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 704

This title looks at the Medium Mark A Whippet, one of the most successful British tanks of World War I and, when placed alongside existing titles covering the Mark I, Mark IV and Mark V, completes the New Vanguard series' coverage of the major British tanks of the war. The evolution of the Whippet is examined in detail, from design and development to mechanical details and crew duties, and information on the operational use of the vehicle is drawn from war diaries and battalion records. The Whippet was involved in several well-known incidents that will be presented in this volume, including the clash at Cachy on April 24, 1918, the actions of the 6th Battalion tank known as "Musical Box" on August 8, 1918, and Sewell's Victoria Cross-winning exploits with the 3rd Battalion on August 29, 1918. Mention will also be made of the Whippet's involvement with the Tank Corps' expedition to Russia. In addition to this examination of the Mark A Whippet is a study of the other Medium tanks up to the end of the war: the Medium B, Medium C, Medium D and the experimental American Studebaker tank.
Categories: History

The Tritton Chaser

The Tritton Chaser

The conception, design, prototype testing and operational service history of the British Army's Medium Mark A 'Whippet' Tank of the First World War.

Author: R. M. Langham

Publisher: Helion

ISBN: 1913336174

Category: History

Page:

View: 191

The conception, design, prototype testing and operational service history of the British Army's Medium Mark A 'Whippet' Tank of the First World War.
Categories: History

Medium Mark A Whippet

Medium Mark A Whippet

THE WHIPPET'S FORERUNNER: THE TRITTON CHASER PRODUCTION OF THE WHIPPET DRIVING THE WHIPPET THE WHIPPET IN ACTION WHIPPETS ABROAD MEDIUM B MEDIUM C: THE HORNET MEDIUM D THE STUDEBAKER TANK MEDIUM MARK A WHIPPET THE WHIPPET'S FORERUNNER: ...

Author: David Fletcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781782004004

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 260

This title looks at the Medium Mark A Whippet, one of the most successful British tanks of World War I and, when placed alongside existing titles covering the Mark I, Mark IV and Mark V, completes the New Vanguard series' coverage of the major British tanks of the war. The evolution of the Whippet is examined in detail, from design and development to mechanical details and crew duties, and information on the operational use of the vehicle is drawn from war diaries and battalion records. The Whippet was involved in several well-known incidents that will be presented in this volume, including the clash at Cachy on April 24, 1918, the actions of the 6th Battalion tank known as “Musical Box” on August 8, 1918, and Sewell's Victoria Cross-winning exploits with the 3rd Battalion on August 29, 1918. Mention will also be made of the Whippet's involvement with the Tank Corps' expedition to Russia. In addition to this examination of the Mark A Whippet is a study of the other Medium tanks up to the end of the war: the Medium B, Medium C, Medium D and the experimental American Studebaker tank.
Categories: History

Provisional Handbook of the Chaser Mark I

Provisional Handbook of the Chaser Mark I

Two hundred of these Whippet tanks, officially known as the Medium Mark A were produced. This manual dates to the early days of the Whippet as it was being produced for the Tank Corps.

Author: Andrew Hills

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1791962424

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 627

In 1916 the British Army had started using tanks in battle in an attempt to break the deadlock of trench warfare. These large lumbering Heavy Tanks were slow and unable to exploit weaknesses in enemy lines or a breakthrough. What was needed was a new 'Medium' Tank, and the Lincolnshire firm of William Foster and Co., the brains behind the Heavy Tanks set to work on a new Medium vehicle. By February 1917, this new vehicle, known as the Tritton Chaser or 'Whippet' was ready in prototype form. Two hundred of these Whippet tanks, officially known as the Medium Mark A were produced. This manual dates to the early days of the Whippet as it was being produced for the Tank Corps. A guide to the operation and maintenance of this new, smaller, and faster tank.
Categories: History

Tanks of World War I

Tanks of World War I

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230588965

Category:

Page: 80

View: 939

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 79. Chapters: Tanks in the Soviet Union, Tanks in the United States, Tanks in the Japanese Army, Mark I tank, Tanks in World War I, Tank Mark VIII, A7V, Medium Mark A Whippet, Mark IV tank, Schneider CA1, Flying Elephant, Comparison of World War I tanks, Mark IX tank, Medium Mark C, Medium Mark B, K-Wagen, Steam tank, Skeleton tank, Holt gas electric tank, Sturmpanzerwagen Oberschlesien, Female tank. Excerpt: Soviet BT-7 tanks on parade.This article deals with the history of tanks of the Soviet Union. World War I established the validity of the tank concept. After the war, many nations needed to have tanks, but only a few had the industrial resources to design and build them. During and after World War I, Britain and France were the intellectual leaders in tank design, with other countries generally following and adopting their designs. This early lead would be gradually lost during the course of the 1930s to the Soviet Union who with Germany began to design and build their own tanks. The Treaty of Versailles had severely limited Germany's industrial output. Therefore, to circumvent the treaty's restrictions, these industrial firms formed partnerships with the Soviet Union, to legally produce weapons and sell them, and along with other factors inadvertently built up a infrastructure to produce tanks which later made the famous T-34 and other Russian tanks. Mark VIII (Liberty) TankImperial Russia had flirted with some designs such as the Tsar Tank which was scraped, and the Vezdekhod (Russian: ) which did not however progress further than a pre-production model, due to problems in the design. The final tank designs in World War I showed a number of trends such as in the US and British produced Mark VIII tank for heavy tanks. However, the FT-17 set the pattern for almost all tanks that followed it; these tanks generally had...
Categories:

Tanks by Era

Tanks by Era

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230588957

Category:

Page: 286

View: 112

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 284. Chapters: Tanks of World War I, Tanks of World War II, Tanks of the Cold War, Tanks of the Korean War, Tanks of the War in Afghanistan (2001-present), Tanks of the interwar period, Tanks of the post-Cold War period, M1 Abrams, M4 Sherman, T-54/55 operators and variants, Tanks in the German Army, Tanks in the Soviet Union, Tanks in the Spanish Army, T-34, Leopard 2, History of the tank, Tanks in the United States, T-62, Tanks in the Japanese Army, Tanks in World War II, M26 Pershing, AMR 35, Mark I tank, Char D2, Leopard 1, Tanks in the Cold War, Panzer II, Char D1, Iosif Stalin tank, T-80 models, Tank Mark VIII, AMC 35, Char 2C, M24 Chaffee, A7V, Medium Mark A Whippet, L3/35, Mark IV tank, Comparison of early World War II tanks, List of main battle tanks by generation, Vickers Medium Mark I, Comet tank, Schneider CA1, Sentinel tank, Type 96, Vickers Medium Mark II, Flying Elephant, M46 Patton, Medium Mark III, Panzer I variants, Bob Semple tank, SdKfz 265 Panzerbefehlswagen, Comparison of World War I tanks, Mark IX tank, Medium Mark C, Medium Mark B, Infanterikanonvagn 91, L3/33, Vickers A1E1 Independent, Strv L-60, Ford GAA engine, K-Wagen, Gepanzerte Pioniermaschine, Steam tank, Skeleton tank, Holt gas electric tank, Charioteer tank destroyer, WPB Anders, Black Prince, Schofield tank, Sho't, Sturmpanzerwagen Oberschlesien, Stridsvagn m/41, Type 95 Heavy Tank, Stridsvagn m/42, Stridsvagn m/37, Strv L-100 and 101, Stridsvagn m/21-29, Female tank, Strv L-5. Excerpt: The T-54/55 tank series is the most widely used tank in the world and it has seen service in over 50 countries. It also served as the platform for a wide variety of specialty armored vehicles. T-54-1 in Verkhnyaya Pyshma war museum in Russia. T-54 at the Parola Tank Museum in Parola, Finland. Ex-Polish T-54A at the Panzermuseum Thun in Thun, Switzerland. T-54K1, ..
Categories:

Armoured Fighting Vehicles of World War I

Armoured Fighting Vehicles of World War I

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230647511

Category:

Page: 90

View: 406

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 89. Chapters: Armoured cars of World War I, Self-propelled artillery of World War I, Tanks of World War I, World War I armoured fighting vehicles of Italy, Tanks in the Soviet Union, Tanks in the United States, Tanks in the Japanese Army, Mark I tank, Tanks in World War I, Tank Mark VIII, A7V, Medium Mark A Whippet, Austin Armoured Car, Mark IV tank, Schneider CA1, Rolls-Royce Armoured Car, Davidson-Cadillac armored car, Flying Elephant, Comparison of World War I tanks, Mark IX tank, Medium Mark C, Lancia IZM, Medium Mark B, Ehrhardt E-V/4, Gun Carrier Mark I, K-Wagen, King Armored Car, Steam tank, Skeleton tank, Holt gas electric tank, List of armoured fighting vehicles of World War I, Lanchester 4x2 Armoured Car, Peugeot Armored Car, Sturmpanzerwagen Oberschlesien, Jeffery armored car, White armored car, Bussing A5P, Garford-Putilov Armoured Car, Female tank, Fiat-Omsky armoured car. Excerpt: Soviet BT-7 tanks on parade.This article deals with the history of tanks of the Soviet Union. World War I established the validity of the tank concept. After the war, many nations needed to have tanks, but only a few had the industrial resources to design and build them. During and after World War I, Britain and France were the intellectual leaders in tank design, with other countries generally following and adopting their designs. This early lead would be gradually lost during the course of the 1930s to the Soviet Union who with Germany began to design and build their own tanks. The Treaty of Versailles had severely limited Germany's industrial output. Therefore, to circumvent the treaty's restrictions, these industrial firms formed partnerships with the Soviet Union, to legally produce weapons and sell them, and along with other factors inadvertently built up a infrastructure to produce tanks which later made the famous T-34 and other...
Categories:

Tanks of the United Kingdom

Tanks of the United Kingdom

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230588981

Category:

Page: 118

View: 572

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 117. Chapters: Light tanks of the United Kingdom, Main battle tanks of the United Kingdom, World War II tanks of the United Kingdom, World War I tanks of the United Kingdom, M4 Sherman, Challenger 2, Light Tank Mk VII Tetrarch, Centurion tank, Mark I tank, Churchill tank, Sherman Firefly, DD tank, Matilda II, Cromwell tank, M3 Lee, Crusader tank, Valentine tank, Tank Mark VIII, Chieftain tank, Hobart's Funnies, Medium Mark A Whippet, Covenanter tank, FV101 Scorpion, Vickers 6-Ton, Light Tank Mk VIII, 17pdr SP Achilles, Vickers Medium Mark I, Comet tank, FV4401 Contentious, Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers, Cruiser tank, Cruiser Mk IV, Vickers Medium Mark II, Valiant tank, Churchill Crocodile, Little Willie, Tortoise heavy assault tank, Medium Mark III, British armoured fighting vehicles of World War II, Cruiser Mk VIII Challenger, Carden Loyd tankette, Cruiser Mk II, Cruiser Mk III, Challenger 1, Cavalier tank, Medium Mark C, Medium Mark B, Vickers A1E1 Independent, List of tanks of the United Kingdom, TOG1, Charioteer tank destroyer, Black Prince, Vickers MBT, TOG2, Excelsior tank, FV300 Series, British Official Armour Specification, A-13, A20 heavy tank. Excerpt: The M4 Sherman, formally Medium Tank, M4, was the primary tank used by the United States during World War II. Thousands were also distributed to the Allies, including the British Commonwealth and Soviet armies, via lend-lease. In the United Kingdom, the M4 was named after Union General William Tecumseh Sherman, following the British practice of naming their American-built tanks after famous American Civil War generals. Subsequently the British name found its way into common use in the U.S. The Sherman evolved from the Grant and Lee medium tanks, which had an unusual side-sponson mounted 75 mm gun. It retained much of the previous mechanical design, but added the...
Categories:

101 Great Tanks

101 Great Tanks

Medium Mark A (Whippet) The Whippet played a vital part in the fighting retreat of the British Army during the German offensive of 1918. Unlike previous British tank designs, this tank was fitted with a revolving turret.

Author: Robert Jackson

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781435835955

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 589

Chronicles military tanks from WWI to the present, from WWI's Mark V to today's M2 Abrams.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

War History of the Sixth Tank Battalion

War History of the Sixth Tank Battalion

His VC was posthumous. This is a very fine history, full of action, and it has a very useful table giving details of each action fought with dates, the number of tanks employed and casualties in personnel and tanks.

Author: Lord Somers

Publisher:

ISBN: 1843426862

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 351

In April 1919, in Blangy-sur-Ternoise where the battalion had been billetted since the armistice, the CO of the 6th Tank Battalion, Lord Somers (late 1st Life Guards) summoned a meeting of all his officers, NCOs and men at which it was unanimously agreed to devote the private funds of the battalion to publishing the battalion history for the benefit of all surviving members and late members, and also of the next-of-kin of all who had fallen in battle or died since joining the battalion. At appendix III is the nominal roll of 242 officers and 1151 other ranks who served with the battalion on the Western Front, for whom the book was written, and I am sure the recipients must have been well satisfied with the finished product. The battalion was formed in Wool (Dorset) in October 1916 and designated 2nd Battalion with A, B and C Companies, and these early days form the opening narrative. At the end of December 1916 the Battalion became known as F Battalion with the companies redesignated 16, 17 and 18. On 13 May 1917 F Battalion landed in France and further instruction was carried on with Mark IV training tanks, a month later the Battalion received their fighting tanks. For the first six months the Battalion fought with Mark IVs, at Third Ypres and Cambrai, and then, in January 1918 they converted to Whippets, or Medium Mark A , and the Battalion title was again changed; it now became the 6th Battalion. With the Whippet the battalion fought through the last year of the war, from Amiens through the advance to victory. By the time of the armistice the 6th Battalion had fought in 27 separate actions employing 290 tanks, of which 83 were knocked out with total casualties of 92 officers and 305 other ranks. There are excellent descriptions of the fighting, often recording the actions and fate of individual tanks, especially at Third Ypres and Cambrai. At the end of each action the casualties are listed by name as are any decorations awarded. Among the latter was Lt Col R.A.West who won the VC while in command in September 1918 having been awarded a Bar to his DSO and the MC during the previous three weeks. His VC was posthumous. This is a very fine history, full of action, and it has a very useful table giving details of each action fought with dates, the number of tanks employed and casualties in personnel and tanks.
Categories: History