Shakespeare s Courtly Mirror

Shakespeare s Courtly Mirror

In an essay on " The Renaissance Imagination : Second World and Green World , " Berger , quoting from Abrams's The Mirror and the ... All of Shakespeare's plays are mirrors in this active sense : they complete or perfect their subject .

Author: David Haley

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN: 0874134439

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 368

"A leading premise of Haley's book is that modern psychological constructs are inadequate for understanding the courtly humanism dramatized by Shakespeare down to 1604. Renaissance culture knows nothing of the bourgeois subject of Locke, Freud, and Lacan. Shakespeare defines aristocratic identity in epic terms and presents not an autonomous individual but a hero whose persona is determined publicly in the "courtly mirror." That exemplary mirror, from Henry IV to Measure for Measure, reflects the heroic actions of rulers and courtiers. The historical self-awareness of Henry, Hal, and Brutus assumes a more contemporary aspect in the courtly self-consciousness of Hamlet, Duke Vincentio, and the three main characters of All's Well That Ends Well: Bertram, Helena, the King." "The "reflexivity" in the title does not indicate the self-referentiality of language, nor does it refer to the traditional paradigm of consciousness implying stable self-knowledge. Courtly reflexivity is oriented toward praxis rather than introspection. Before taking action, the courtier or cortigiana - Helena is a good example - knows only that (s)he is not what (s)he is. The courtier's deliberation is guided by a reflexive, self-regulating prudence that is usually identified with honor or love. In All's Well, Shakespeare contrasts this self-providence or heroic prudence with Divine Providence, but he does so obliquely. While focusing exclusively upon a court which prizes worldly action, he sustains his contrast through a series of ironical allusions to Scripture." "Beginning with a prologue on the problems raised by structural and theatrical interpretations of Bertram's role, Haley goes on to introduce his concept of reflexivity by way of an exchange with the new literary historicism. Chapters 1 to 3 follow the courtly debate over providence and honor, through Helena's triumph in act 2 to Bertram's deserting her. The collapse of her providential design coincides with the crisis of the sick King's honor - a crisis which Shakespeare describes alchemically, implying that alchemy, understood as reflexive chemistry, offers another mirror of the courtier's self-providence." "Chapter 4, the center of the book, brings together historical providence and Boccaccian prudence (avvedimento) in the figure of Ahab, with whom Shakespeare compares both Bertram and the Hal of Henry V. Chapters 5 to 7 pursue Shakespeare's ironic parallel between biblical Providence and courtly prudence, examining specific scenes of self-judgment and self-betrayal in the Henriad and Measure for Measure, as well as in All's Well."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare s Webs

Shakespeare s Webs

Yet if this crystal glass cannot be trusted— like Sad Circumspection's “mirror encircled in this interlude, ... 3 In Shakespeare's day, too, mirrors were most frequently used as metaphoric means of displaying exemplary or infernal ...

Author: Arthur F. Kinney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135876272

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 500

In this book, renowned Renaissance drama critic Arthur F. Kinney argues that Shakespeare's method of composing plays through networks of meanings can be seen as a harbinger of today's information technology. Drawing upon hypertext and cognitive theory--areas that have for some time promised to take on more importance in the sphere of Shakespeare Studies--as well as the central metaphor of the Routledge collection The Renaissance Computer, Kinney looks in detail at four objects/images in Shakespeare's plays--mirrors, maps, clocks, and books--and explores the ways in which they make up networks of meaning within single plays and across the dramatist's body of work that anticipate in some ways the networks of meaning or "information" now possible in the computer age.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Theatre and Testimony in Shakespeare s England

Theatre and Testimony in Shakespeare s England

This curious displacement finds its explanation in Meredith Anne Skura's observation that mirrors were not supposed to show merely faithful images: 'to hold a (truth-revealing) mirror up to Nature was to reveal something the unaided eye ...

Author: Holger Schott Syme

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139503402

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 421

Holger Syme presents a radically new explanation for the theatre's importance in Shakespeare's time. He portrays early modern England as a culture of mediation, dominated by transactions in which one person stood in for another, giving voice to absent speakers or bringing past events to life. No art form related more immediately to this culture than the theatre. Arguing against the influential view that the period underwent a crisis of representation, Syme draws upon extensive archival research in the fields of law, demonology, historiography and science to trace a pervasive conviction that testimony and report, delivered by properly authorised figures, provided access to truth. Through detailed close readings of plays by Ben Jonson and William Shakespeare - in particular Volpone, Richard II and The Winter's Tale - and analyses of criminal trial procedures, the book constructs a revisionist account of the nature of representation on the early modern stage.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Native Shakespeares

Native Shakespeares

The text's subsequent stage direction reads, “The face of Martin Cunningham, bearded, refeatures Shakespeare's beardless ... The mirror, in this case, may be said to be Shakespeare himself, who has (as Stephen argues) both realized and ...

Author: Parmita Kapadia

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317089834

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 227

Explored in this essay collection is how Shakespeare is rewritten, reinscribed and translated to fit within the local tradition, values, and languages of the world's various communities and cultures. Contributors show that Shakespeare, regardless of the medium - theater, pedagogy, or literary studies - is commonly 'rooted' in the local customs of a people in ways that challenge the notion that his drama promotes a Western idealism. Native Shakespeares examines how the persistent indigenization of Shakespeare complicates the traditional vision of his work as a voice of Western culture and colonial hegemony. The international range of the collection and the focus on indigenous practices distinguishes Native Shakespeares from other available texts.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare Survey Volume 56 Shakespeare and Comedy

Shakespeare Survey  Volume 56  Shakespeare and Comedy

Joyce attempts to overcome the mole , forget the father , by shuttling the molecules of Shakespeare's work ; but as ... The vision appears when Stephen's friend Lynch says , ' The mirror up to nature ' , echoing Hamlet's instructions ...

Author: Peter Holland

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521827272

Category: Drama

Page: 370

View: 464

Published with academic researchers and graduate students in mind, this volume of the 'Shakespeare Survey' presents a number of contributions on the theme of Shakespeare's comedies, as well as the comedy in Shakespeare's other works.
Categories: Drama

Shakespeare and the Cultural Colonization of Ireland

Shakespeare and the Cultural Colonization of Ireland

of mirrors and procreation in his discussion on Sonnet 18. Images of mirrors season Shakespeare's plays as well as his sonnets, and Greenblatt's point about the connections between them brings up Shakespeare's preoccupations with ...

Author: Robin Bates

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135905125

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 178

View: 485

Focusing on plays (Richard II, Henry V, and Hamlet) which appear prominently in the writing of the Irish nationalist movement of the early twentieth century, this study explores how Irish writers such as Sean O’Casey, Samuel Beckett, W. B. Yeats, G. B. Shaw, James Joyce, and Seamus Heaney resisted English cultural colonization through a combination of reappropriation and critique of Shakespeare's work.
Categories: Literary Criticism

At Home in Shakespeare s Tragedies

At Home in Shakespeare s Tragedies

“The Emblematic Castle in Shakespeare and Middleton.” In J.C. Gray, ed. Mirror up to Shakespeare. 223–41. Lanzi, Abate Luigi. The History of Painting in Italy. Vol. 2. London: George Bell, 1887. Lawrence, Roderick J. “Deciphering Home: ...

Author: Geraldo U. de Sousa

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317177678

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 209

Bringing together methods, assumptions and approaches from a variety of disciplines, Geraldo U. de Sousa's innovative study explores the representation, perception, and function of the house, home, household, and family life in Shakespeare's great tragedies. Concentrating on King Lear, Hamlet, Othello, and Macbeth, de Sousa's examination of the home provides a fresh look at material that has been the topic of fierce debate. Through a combination of textual readings and a study of early modern housing conditions, accompanied by analyses that draw on anthropology, architecture, art history, the study of material culture, social history, theater history, phenomenology, and gender studies, this book demonstrates how Shakespeare explores the materiality of the early modern house and evokes domestic space to convey interiority, reflect on the habits of the mind, interrogate everyday life, and register elements of the tragic journey. Specific topics include the function of the disappearance of the castle in King Lear, the juxtaposition of home-centered life in Venice and nomadic, 'unhoused' wandering in Othello, and the use of special lighting effects to reflect this relationship, Hamlet's psyche in response to physical space, and the redistribution of domestic space in Macbeth. Images of the house, home, and household become visually and emotionally vibrant, and thus reflect, define, and support a powerful tragic narrative.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Shakespeare s Asian Journeys

Shakespeare   s Asian Journeys

In Seoul, I see Shakespeare—in Korean, incorporating traditional Korean art, blending Shakespeare's themes with ... Harold Bloom compares Shakespeare to a mirror, in Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human Being: “... a mirror ...

Author: Bi-qi Beatrice Lei

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781315442952

Category: Drama

Page: 292

View: 111

This volume gives Asia’s Shakespeares the critical, theoretical, and political space they demand, offering rich, alternative ways of thinking about Asia, Shakespeare, and Asian Shakespeare based on Asian experiences and histories. Challenging and supplementing the dominant critical and theoretical structures that determine Shakespeare studies today, close analysis of Shakespeare’s Asian journeys, critical encounters, cultural geographies, and the political complexions of these negotiations reveal perspectives different to the European. Exploring what Shakespeare has done to Asia along with what Asia has done with Shakespeare, this book demonstrates how Shakespeare helps articulate Asianess, unfolding Asia’s past, reflecting Asia’s present, and projecting Asia’s future. This is achieved by forgoing the myth of the Bard’s universality, bypassing the authenticity test, avoiding merely descriptive or even ethnographic accounts, and using caution when applying Western theoretical frameworks. Many of the productions studied in this volume are brought to critical attention for the first time, offering new methodologies and approaches across disciplines including history, philosophy, sociology, geopolitics, religion, postcolonial studies, psychology, translation theory, film studies, and others. The volume explores a range of examples, from exquisite productions infused with ancient aesthetic traditions to popular teen manga and television drama, from state-dictated appropriations to radical political commentaries in areas including Japan, India, Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia, China, and the Philippines. This book goes beyond a showcasing of Asian adaptations in various languages, styles, and theatre traditions, and beyond introductory essays intended to help an unknowing audience appreciate Asian performances, developing a more inflected interpretative dialogue with other areas of Shakespeare studies.
Categories: Drama

Shakespeare in His Context

Shakespeare in His Context

“ Doing Literature on Dover Beach'in John Agresto and Peter Reisenberg ( eds ) , The Humanist as Citizen ( Chapel Hill , University of North Carolina Press ) . ... Mirror up to Shakespeare ( Toronto , University of Toronto Press ) .

Author: Muriel Clara Bradbrook

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0389208779

Category: Drama

Page: 207

View: 276

'As we expect from Bradbrook, always a pleasantly readable scholar, these papers consistently convey rich, penetrating, informative, durable perspectives on Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. Strongly recommended for all English literature and drama collections in four-year educational institutions and in graduate schools.'
Categories: Drama

The Child in Shakespeare

The Child in Shakespeare

This swift, violent movement resonates with Titus as another example of the brutality in which they are mired and he asks Marcus: 'How if that fly had a ... The Mirror up to Shakespeare (Toronto: Toronto University Press, 1983), pp.

Author: Charlotte Scott

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192563767

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 874

This book examines the child on Shakespeare's stage. As a life force, an impassioned plea for justice, a legacy, history, memory or image of love or violence, children are everywhere in Shakespeare's plays. Focusing on Shakespeare's unique interest in the young body, the life stage, and the parental and social dynamic, this book offers the first sustained account of the role and representation of the child in Shakespeare's dramatic imagination. Drawing on a vast range of contemporary texts, including parenting manuals and household and pedagogic texts, as well as books on nursing and maternity, child birth, and child rearing, The Child in Shakespeare explores the contexts in which the idea of the child is mobilised as a body and image on the early modern stage. Understanding the child, not only as a specific life stage, but also as a role and an abstraction of feeling, this book examines why Shakespeare, who showed little interest in writing for children in the playing companies, wrote so powerfully about them on his stage.
Categories: Literary Criticism