Mohawk Baronet

Mohawk Baronet

Johnson's appearance in the Mohawk Valley and his drawing settlers there ... The baronetcy has continued to the present day under the designation “ Johnson of New York . ... He was also highly 352 Mohawk Baronet.

Author: James Thomas Flexner

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815602391

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 982

William Johnson was among the most powerful and romantic figures in early American history. Beginning as an impoverished eighteenth century Irish immigrant, he became the wealthiest and most influential Indian leader on the North American continent. Married to Molly Brant, sister of the celebrated Mohawk Joseph Brant, Johnson served as a mediator in the evolving clash of the European and Native American cultures. This new edition brings back into print a classic work that will be welcomed reading for all those interested in early American history and American-Indian relations.
Categories: History

Speculators in Empire

Speculators in Empire

For notable published references see, Griffis, Sir William Johnson; Flexner, Mohawk Baronet; and Flexner, Lord of the Mohawks. For an excellent summary of Johnson, see Taylor, Divided Ground, 3–15; and Mullin, “Personal Politics.

Author: William J Campbell

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806147109

Category: Law

Page: 296

View: 527

At the 1768 Treaty of Fort Stanwix, the British secured the largest land cession in colonial North America. Crown representatives gained possession of an area claimed but not occupied by the Iroquois that encompassed parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia. The Iroquois, however, were far from naïve—and the outcome was not an instance of their simply being dispossessed by Europeans. In Speculators in Empire, William J. Campbell examines the diplomacy, land speculation, and empire building that led up to the treaty. His detailed study overturns common assumptions about the roles of the Iroquois and British on the eve of the American Revolution. Through the treaty, the Iroquois directed the expansion of empire in order to serve their own needs while Crown negotiators obtained more territory than they were authorized to accept. How did this questionable transfer happen, who benefited, and at what cost? Campbell unravels complex intercultural negotiations in which colonial officials, land speculators, traders, tribes, and individual Indians pursued a variety of agendas, each side possessing considerable understanding of the other’s expectations and intentions. Historians have credited British Indian superintendent Sir William Johnson with pulling off the land grab, but Campbell shows that Johnson was only one of many players. Johnson’s deputy, George Croghan, used the treaty to capitalize on a lifetime of scheming and speculation. Iroquois leaders and their peoples also benefited substantially. With keen awareness of the workings of the English legal system, they gained protection for their homelands by opening the Ohio country to settlement. Campbell’s navigation of the complexities of Native and British politics and land speculation illuminates a time when regional concerns and personal politicking would have lasting consequences for the continent. As Speculators in Empire shows, colonial and Native history are unavoidably entwined, and even interdependent.
Categories: Law

The Iroquois in the War of 1812

The Iroquois in the War of 1812

8 Richter , Ordeal , 238–40 ; Jennings , Iroquois Empire , 258–62 ; James Thomas Flexner , Mohawk Baronet ( 1959 ; 1979 ; Syracuse 1989 ) , 266 , 271 ; and Gregory Evans Dowd , A Spirited Resistance ( Baltimore 1992 ) , 1-46 9 Robert J.

Author: Carl Benn

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802081452

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 947

Describes how the Six Nations got involved in the War of 1812, the role they played in the defense of Canada, and the war's effects on their society
Categories: History

American Indian Leaders

American Indian Leaders

1 , 2 ; Eleazar Wheelock , quoted in James T. Flexner , Mohawk Baronet , Sir William Johnson of New York ( New York : Harper Bros. , 1959 ) , p . 292 . 3. William L. Stone , The Life of Joseph Brant - Thayendanegea ( New York : G.

Author: Russell David Edmunds

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803267053

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 920

Diverse patterns and goals of leadership are illuminated in portraits of twelve Indian leaders since the colonial era including Old Briton, Joseph Brant, Sitting Bull, Quanah Parker, Carlos Montezuma, and Peter MacDonald
Categories: History

Renegade Revolutionary

Renegade Revolutionary

Timothy J. Shannon, Iroquois Diplomacy on the EarlyAmerican Frontier (New York: Viking, 2008), 136. 39. Anderson, The War That MadeAmerica, 179–180; Shannon, Iroquois Diplomacy, 159; and James T. Flexner, Mohawk Baronet: ...

Author: Phillip Papas

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479851218

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 358

In November 1774, a pamphlet to the People of America was published in Philadelphia and London. It forcefully articulated American rights and liberties and argued that the Americans needed to declare their independence from Britain. The author of this pamphlet was Charles Lee, a former British army officer turned revolutionary, who was one of the earliest advocates for American independence. Lee fought on and off the battlefield for expanded democracy, freedom of conscience, individual liberties, human rights, and for the formal education of women. Renegade Revolutionary: The Life of General Charles Lee ais a vivid new portrait of one of the most complex and controversial of the American revolutionaries. LeeOCOs erratic behavior and comportment, his capture and more than one year imprisonment by the British, and his court martial after the battle of Monmouth in 1778 have dominated his place in the historiography of the American Revolution. This book retells the story of a man who had been dismissed by contemporaries and by history. Few American revolutionaries shared his radical political outlook, his cross-cultural experiences, his cosmopolitanism, and his confidence that the American Revolution could be won primarily by the militia (or irregulars) rather than a centralized regular army. By studying LeeOCOs life, his political and military ideas, and his style of leadership, we gain new insights into the way the American revolutionaries fought and won their independence from Britain."
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Native American Freemasonry

Native American Freemasonry

Johnson never lost his respect for elemental powers or for indigenous means ofhealing and is known to have sought relief at a magical healing stream shown to him by Iroquois sachems in 1767 (Flexner, Mohawk Baronet, 314). 25.

Author: Joy Porter

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803225473

Category: Social Science

Page: 367

View: 617

Freemasonry has played a significant role in the history of Native Americans since the colonial era?a role whose extent and meaning are fully explored for the first time in this book. The work?s overarching concern is with how Masonry met specific social and personal needs, a theme developed across three significant periods of membership: the revolutionary era, the last third of the nineteenth century, and the years following the First World War. Joy Porter places Freemasonry into historical context, revealing its social and political impact as a transatlantic phenomenon at the heart of the colonizing process. She then explores its meaning for many of the key Native leaders over time, for the ethnic groups who sought to make connections with it, and for the bulk of its American membership?the white, Anglo-Saxon Protestant middle class. Porter contends that Freemasonry offered special access to Native Americans through its performance of ritual, an assertion borne out by a wealth of contemporary manuscripts, newspapers, pamphlets, Masonic sermons, orations, and lodge records and writings by Masonic historians and antiquarians gleaned from archives in New York, Philadelphia, Oklahoma, California, and London. Through these documents, she demonstrates that over time, Freemasonry became a significant avenue for the exchange, and perhaps even cocreation, of cultural forms by Indians and non-Indians.
Categories: Social Science

Catherine Weissenberg

Catherine Weissenberg

From: Grant Bavister Date: 22 November 2013 15:41 To: Heather Campbell Subject: Baronetcy of Johnson of New York Dear Mrs ... Young Garter Albert W. Woods Lancaster Herald" The footnote on page 234 of Mohawk Baronet sent by Mrs Campbell ...

Author: H G Campbell

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781326988739

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 736

When I started to trace my ancestors I found what I expected at first; miners, woodsmen, soldiers, musicians and even a cordwainer. Going back further I was surprised to find Colonels, Generals, a bank manager, a Highland Chief, Scottish royalty and a Palatine refugee who sold herself into seven years servitude to get to the colony of America. There she was bought by an Irishman who took her to the frontier to keep his house and warm his bed. She had 3 children by him before she achieved her freedom. This woman, my 5 times great-grandmother is lied about in biographies of her owner, my 5 times great grandfather, William Johnson, and traduced on genealogy sites. Here I set out the truth about her with incontrovertible evidence obtained from a man known as Garter via the House of Lords in London, England.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars 1607 1890

The Encyclopedia of North American Indian Wars  1607   1890

Mohawk Baronet:A Biography of Sir William Johnson. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1989. Hamilton, Milton W. Sir William Johnson, ColonialAmerican, 1715–1763. Port Washington, NY: Kennikat, 1976. O'Toole, Fintan.

Author: Spencer Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781851096978

Category: History

Page: 1318

View: 100

This encyclopedia provides a broad, in-depth, and multidisciplinary look at the causes and effects of warfare between whites and Native Americans, encompassing nearly three centuries of history.
Categories: History

English Atlantics Revisited

English Atlantics Revisited

26 C.H. McIlwain, “Introduction,” in wa; Hamilton, Sir William Johnson, 29; Flexner, Mohawk Baronet, 33–4; Aquila, Iroquois Restoration, 259n4; Jennings, Ambiguous Iroquois Empire, 369–70; Richter, Ordeal of the Longhouse, 264; Fenton, ...

Author: Nancy L. Rhoden

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773560406

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 994

Ian K. Steele's pioneering work in imperial and early North American history was a pivotal contribution to the establishment of Atlantic history as a field. His study of a unified English - and later British - Atlantic challenged American exceptionalism and encouraged the current wave of interest in Atlantic studies.
Categories: History

Imperial Entanglements

Imperial Entanglements

Shoemaker, 49—7 1; and Allan Greer, Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits (New York: Oxford University ... of the Mohawks: A Biography ofSir William Johnson (New York: Macmillan, 1930); James T. Flexner, Mohawk Baronet: A ...

Author: Gail D. MacLeitch

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812208511

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 289

Imperial Entanglements chronicles the history of the Haudenosaunee Iroquois in the eighteenth century, a dramatic period during which they became further entangled in a burgeoning market economy, participated in imperial warfare, and encountered a waxing British Empire. Rescuing the Seven Years' War era from the shadows of the American Revolution and moving away from the political focus that dominates Iroquois studies, historian Gail D. MacLeitch offers a fresh examination of Iroquois experience in economic and cultural terms. As land sellers, fur hunters, paid laborers, consumers, and commercial farmers, the Iroquois helped to create a new economic culture that connected the New York hinterland to a transatlantic world of commerce. By doing so they exposed themselves to both opportunities and risks. As their economic practices changed, so too did Iroquois ways of making sense of gender and ethnic differences. MacLeitch examines the formation of new cultural identities as men and women negotiated challenges to long-established gendered practices and confronted and cocreated a new racialized discourses of difference. On the frontiers of empire, Indians, as much as European settlers, colonial officials, and imperial soldiers, directed the course of events. However, as MacLeitch also demonstrates, imperial entanglements with a rising British power intent on securing native land, labor, and resources ultimately worked to diminish Iroquois economic and political sovereignty.
Categories: History