Mr Punch s History of Modern England Volume 4 of 4 1892 1914

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England  Volume 4 of 4    1892 1914

Charles Graves. HARLES GRAWES MR PUNCHS HIS ORY OF MODERN = NG|A|N|). VOLUME A OF 4 – 1892 – 1914. Charles L. Graves Mr. Punch's History of Modern England, Vol. Front Cover.

Author: Charles Graves

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 9785040583638

Category: Fiction

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Mr Punch s History of Modern England

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England

Reproduction of the original : Mr . Punch ' s History of Modern England by Charles L . Graves ISBN 978 - 3 - 75233 - 885 - 0 Price 39 . 90 € [ D , A , CH ) 59 . 90 $ [ US ] 39 . 90 £ ( UK ) III 978375 2338 850 11.

Author: Charles L. Graves

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783752338850

Category: Fiction

Page: 326

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Reproduction of the original: Mr. Punch's History of Modern England by Charles L. Graves
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Mr Punch s History of Modern England Vol 1 4

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England  Vol  1 4

To write a Social History of England at any time without reference to the political background would be difficult; it is practically impossible in a chronicle based on Punch in the 'forties and 'fifties. In the second part I have ...

Author: Charles L. Graves

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: EAN:4064066499884

Category: History

Page: 1136

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Punch's History of Modern England is a unique review of the English customs, traditions, education, nobility, courts, fashion, culture, and personalities entirely based on the articles from Punch, the British satirical journal. As the author mentions in the preface, "The Files of Punch have been generally admitted to be a valuable mine of information of the manners, customs and fashions f the Victorian age." This is one of the best examples of Victorian-era humor prose and gives a unique insight into the history of England outside political matters._x000D_ _x000D_
Categories: History

Mr Punch s History of Modern England Vol I 1841 1857 of 4 Illustrations

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England Vol  I   1841 1857  of 4    Illustrations

Punch's efforts on behalf of Sunday recreation, already alluded to, exposed him to a great deal of hostile criticism. In 1854 the English Journal of Education declared that Punch was not suitable reading for Sunday: it was "worse than ...

Author: Charles Larcom Graves

Publisher: CASSELL AND COMPANY, LTD

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Page: 186

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Example in this ebook The title of this work indicates at once its main source and its limitations. The files of Punch have been generally admitted to be a valuable mine of information on the manners, customs, and fashions of the Victorian age, and of the wealth of material thus provided liberal use has been made. But it must not be forgotten that Punch has always been a London paper, and that in so far as English life is reflected in his pages, London always comes first, though in this volume, and especially during the "Hungry 'Forties," Lancashire comes a very good second. For pictures of provincial society—such, for example, as that given in Cranford or in the novels of Trollope—or of life in Edinburgh or Dublin, the chronicler of Victorian England must look outside Punch. The "country cousin" is not forgotten, but for the most part comes into view when he is on a visit to London, not when he is on his native heath. Yet even with these deductions the amount of material is embarrassingly rich. And this is due not only to the multiplicity of subjects treated, but to the manner in which they were discussed. Of Punch, in his early days at any rate, the criticism recently applied to Victorian writers in general by a writer in Blackwood holds good: "They had a great deal to say, and they said it sometimes in too loud a voice. Such was their virtue, to which their vice was akin. Their vice was the vice of rhetoric. They fell to the temptation of many words. They wrote too often as the tub-thumper speaks, without much self-criticism and with a too fervent desire to be heard immediately and at all costs." In the 'forties Punch doubled the rôles of jester and political pamphleteer, and in the latter capacity indulged in a great deal of vehement partisan rhetoric. The loudest, the most passionate and moving as well as the least judicial of his spokesmen was Douglas Jerrold. The choice of dividing lines between periods must always be somewhat artificial, but I was confirmed in my decision to end the first volume with the year of the Indian Mutiny by the fact that it coincided with the death of Douglas Jerrold, who from 1841 to 1857 had, more than any other writer, been responsible for the Radical and humanitarian views expressed in Punch. My task would have been greatly simplified by the exclusion of politics altogether. But to do that would have involved the neglect of what is, after all, perhaps the most interesting and in many ways the most honourable phase of Punch's history, his championship of the poor and oppressed, and his efforts to bridge the gap between the "Two Nations"—the phrase which was used and justified in the finest passage of Disraeli's Sybil, and which I have chosen as the title for the first part of the present volume. To write a Social History of England at any time without reference to the political background would be difficult; it is practically impossible in a chronicle based on Punch in the 'forties and 'fifties. In the second part I have endeavoured to redress the balance. Here one recognizes the advantages of Punch's London outlook in dealing with the Court and fashion and the acute contrasts furnished between Mayfair on the one hand and the suburbs and slums on the other. No attempt has been made to represent Punch as infallible whether as a recorder, a critic, or a prophet. He was often wrong, unjust, and even cruel—notably in his view of Peel and Lincoln, and in his conduct of the "No Popery" crusade—though he seldom failed to make amends, even to the extent of standing in a white sheet over Lincoln's grave. To be continue in this ebook
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Mr Punch s History of Modern England Vol III 1874 1892 of 4 Illustrations

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England Vol  III   1874 1892  of 4    Illustrations

The grant of money for his expenses was opposed in the House in January, and Punch admitted that the opposition was not altogether captious:— Everybody but Mr. Disraeli and Mr. Gladstone seems to think the Government has done the thing ...

Author: Charles Larcom Graves

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Example in this ebook PART I THE NATIONAL OUTLOOK HIGH POLITICS The pageant of the Victorian age reached its grand climacteric in the period on which we now enter. As a "drum and trumpet chronicle" the history of the eighteen years from 1874 to 1892 was void of any British military operations on the grand scale. Of the names Kandahar, Maiwand, Isandhlwana, Majuba, Khartoum and Tel-el-Kebir only the first and last minister to our complacency. Yet the achievements of Lord Roberts in the two Afghan campaigns were splendid examples of bold leadership and British endurance, and Lord Wolseley's suppression of the revolt of Arabi was more than efficient. In the mid 'seventies Germany came perilously near forcing a fresh war on France; but the influence of the British Crown and Government was largely instrumental in averting the calamity. We were twice on the verge of war with Russia in 1878, first in April after the Treaty of San Stefano at the close of the Russo-Turkish war, and second in July over Russia's intervention in Afghanistan. The country was divided, for while there had been a revival of the old distrust of Russia, Gladstone had thrown the whole weight of his influence into the campaign of protest against the "Bulgarian atrocities." The Government, on the whole, steered a middle course between the "Jingoes" and those who supported Gladstone's "bag and baggage" policy towards the Turks. At the height of the Tory Press campaign against Russia, Lord Salisbury, in a speech in the City, observed: "It has been generally acknowledged to be madness to go to war for an idea, but it is yet more unsatisfactory to go to war against a nightmare." Punch, who was never pro-Russian, but at the moment was strongly anti-Turk, interpreted this saying as a caution against Jingo scaremongering. In one of the earliest of his cartoons on the possibility of war over the Eastern question, he represented Disraeli standing on the edge of a precipice with Britannia, asking her to move "just a leetle nearer." Britannia declines to move one inch farther, adding, "I'm a good deal nearer than is pleasant already." But four months later, in May, 1878, when he showed Britannia between two advisers, Disraeli and Bright—the former wearing a sword camouflaged with an olive wreath—Punch supported neither, but applauded the third Voice, that of Neutrality. Professorial intervention he resented strongly; and severely rebuked Freeman, the historian, for a violent and unpatriotic speech. In fine, he was equally down on the blatant bunkum of the music-halls and the ill-considered agitation of fussy Pacificists; on War-Donkeys and Peace-Donkeys; "Asses are asses, whether bound in Lion or in Calf." But if in Europe Great Britain never got beyond the stage of naval demonstrations and the summoning of troops from India, these eighteen years were not devoid of great as well as spectacular events. They opened with the triumphant return to power of Disraeli, admirably symbolized in Tenniel's great cartoon of the chariot driver and his fallen rival, and with his efforts to translate into practical politics his grandiose doctrines of Imperialism. He made the Queen Empress of India, he riveted our hold on the Suez Canal by the opportune purchase of the Khedive's shares in 1875; he claimed to have brought back "Peace with Honour" from the Berlin Congress of 1878, the year which marked the zenith of his power and the beginning of its decline. The twelve years that followed Gladstone's success at the polls in 1880 were crowded with momentous events; the rise and ferment of the new nationalities abroad; the advent of new champions and gladiators in the political arena at home—Parnell and Randolph Churchill and Chamberlain. To be continue in this ebook
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Mr Punch s History of Modern England Vol II 1857 1874 of 4 Illustrations

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England Vol  II   1857 1874  of 4    Illustrations

In the period under review in this volume England was dominated by two monstrosities, the crinoline and the Claimant. ... With Punch it was a positive obsession. ... Mr. Punch's History of Modern England: FASHION IN DRESS.

Author: Charles Larcom Graves

Publisher: CASSELL AND COMPANY, LTD

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Page: 211

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Example in this ebook PART I THE NATIONAL OUTLOOK Mr. PUNCH'S HISTORY OF MODERN ENGLAND THE AGE OF NON-INTERVENTION "Whether splendidly isolated or dangerously isolated, I will not now debate; but for my part I think splendidly isolated, because this isolation of England comes from her superiority." These words were used by Sir Wilfrid Laurier in 1896, but they were prompted by a retrospect of the Victorian age, and may serve as a motto for the policy which governed England in her relations with foreign countries in the period surveyed in this volume. There was serious friction with France in the early days of the Empire owing to the distrust of the Emperor's warlike preparations and his manipulation of the opportunities presented by his assistance of Italy in 1859. In the war of North and South in America, England as a whole "backed the wrong horse," and English diplomacy mishandled the obligations of our neutrality. We were on the verge of war over the Trent case, and the slackness of the Government in failing to detain the Alabama burdened the country with a costly legacy of moral and intellectual damage—to say nothing of pecuniary loss. Popular sentiment was strongly anti-Prussian in the war on Denmark in 1864; misgivings of Prussian aggression were heightened by the crushing defeat of Austria in 1866 and the French débâcle in 1870. Yet the old diplomacy, whatever its shortcomings, kept us out of European wars. The Court as well as the Government strove hard for peace in 1859; the Queen's influence was successfully exerted to prevent interference on behalf of Denmark in 1864, which had been foreshadowed in a menacing message to Austria from Lord Palmerston. After the defeat of the Austrians at Sadowa in 1866, Disraeli justified abstention from unnecessary interference in European politics, on the ground that England had outgrown the European Continent, and was really more of an Asiatic than a European power. With Gladstone the restraining motive was economic rather than anti-imperialist, though his distrust of a "spirited foreign policy" became more pronounced in later years. But under Liberals and Conservatives alike, non-intervention in European wars remained the unbroken rule, and the only serious military operations undertaken between 1857 and 1874 were those involved in the suppression of a great revolt within our own dominions. The Chinese quarrel was the only cloud on the horizon in the beginning of 1857. Parliament was dissolved as the result of the vote of censure passed in the Commons, but Palmerston was returned with a strong majority, and the pacificists under Cobden lost their seats, Punch expressing the hope that Cobden might be "master of himself though China fall." The war with China was not a glorious page in our annals: it remained in abeyance during the Mutiny and was not concluded till 1860. Indirectly it was one of the means of saving India by the diversion of the troops intended for the Far East, and already at Singapore, to the relief of Bengal at the urgent summons of Lord Canning, the Governor-General of India. The first mention of the outbreak in Punch followed close on the tragedy of Meerut early in May. In his "Essence of Parliament" we read:— Lord Ellenborough delivered an alarmist speech about the mutinies in our Indian Army. Among other terrors, he was hideously afraid that Lord Canning, the Governor-General, had been taking some step which showed that he thought Christianity a true religion, but this damaging accusation was happily explained away. Lord Lansdowne was almost sure that Lord Canning could not so far have misconducted himself. To be continue in this ebook
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Mr Punch s History of Modern England Volume 3 of 4 1874 1892

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England  Volume 3 of 4    1874 1892

In the 'eighties the depression of the landed interest led to further dispersion of treasures, beginning with the Duke ... The influence of the "New Rich" in England on art only ministered to Punch's sense of ridicule, happily exercised ...

Author: Charles Graves

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 9785040583515

Category: Fiction

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Mr Punch s History of Modern England Volume 2 of 4 1857 1874

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England  Volume 2 of 4    1857 1874

ampleness and nobleness in treatment of costume, which bespeaks the grand and heroic in the wearer? The Briton Abroad At this point Punch deviates into absurdity. But the main argument is sound. As a transition, however, to the subject ...

Author: Charles Graves

Publisher: Litres

ISBN: 9785040583997

Category: Fiction

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View: 710

Categories: Fiction

Mr Punch s History of Modern England

Mr  Punch s History of Modern England

As for the vote , a good illustration is to be found in the advertisement of the sale of the Earl of Ducie's domain in 1843 , quoted by Punch on page 14 of Vol . v . , including " the entire village of Nymphfield , wherein are 66 houses ...

Author: Charles Larcom Graves

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015028780545

Category: English wit and humor

Page: 338

View: 841

Categories: English wit and humor