My Promised Land

My Promised Land

Can Israel survive? Provocative, heartfelt, and powerfully compelling, this is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape.

Author: Ari Shavit

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN: 9781922070593

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 529

An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. In this riveting narrative, Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, to illuminate the pivotal moments of the Zionist century. In doing so, he also sheds new light on the problems and threats that Israel is currently facing. Beginning with his great-grandfather — a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people — Shavit recounts and analyses the diverse experiences of Israeli people, past and present: the idealist young farmer who first grew the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Provocative, heartfelt, and powerfully compelling, this is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape.
Categories: History

The Promised Land

The Promised Land

It is you who should drop your weapons and remove yourself from my property immediately,” Zorra responded. “You have a girl to do your bidding for you. Is this some kind ofjoke?” asked the earl. “Grok, tell the good earl what Suntora is ...

Author: Patrick E. Thomas

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 9781479788446

Category: Fiction

Page: 178

View: 770

"The Promised Land" tells of a warrior angel, anointed by God to punish those who have turned to evil and save those who suffer but whose faith never falter. Vengeance will rain down on those who do the bidding of the evil one. The land that God created has lost its purity and splendor due to the plague of filth and corruption brought by man. God is deeply hurt and disappointed by what Satan has done to God's most precious creations and by these creations' choice to embrace evil and turn their backs against the Lord. To stop evil from shrouding the world in its gloomy veil, God summons his warrior named Zorra. Armed with his faith and the power given to him by God, Zorra enters the world of mortals to destroy the evil that threatens to bring mankind apart. Zorra's entry to the world leads him to Hampshire, England. He immediately notices the suffering of the Jews and the cruelty of the rich and powerful with King Richard, the ruler of England, as the worst of them all. Zorra knows King Richard's demise is the key to restore peace in the kingdom. But God does not want King Richard to die; the former still wants to give the latter a chance to repent and change his ways. King Richard might resist, but Zorra is determined to end the king's cruelty to the Jews and save God's chosen people from the ruler's cruel hands. To do this, Zorra must return the Jews to Jerusalem, The Promised Land.
Categories: Fiction

Bound For the Promised Land

Bound For the Promised Land

The publication in 1991 of Nicholas Lemann's The Promised Land : The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America has stimulated discussion of the migration northward of southern blacks and its effects on contemporary American life ...

Author: Milton C. Sernett

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822319934

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 499

DIVDiscusses the migration of African-Americans from the south to the north after WWI through the 1940s and the effect this had on African-American churches and religions./div
Categories: History

Exile in the Promised Land

Exile in the Promised Land

For several minutes, as the Chair futilely tried to bring the Knesset to order, there was pandemonium. ... In grade school I argued with the teachers who taught us capitalism as though it were 80 exile in the promised land.

Author: Marcia Freedman

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39076002455173

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 254

View: 436

"Marcia Freedman's lively first-person account of her fourteen years in Israel, the story of a modern Jewish woman's longing to be at home in the homeland of the Jews. Founder of the women's liberation movement, former member of the Knesset, she examines the contradictions between idealistic vision and flawed reality in her adopted country."--BOOK JACKET.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Promised Land

The Promised Land

History and Historiography of the Black Experience in Chatham-Kent's Settlements ind Beyond. culture, and identities. Readers will also recognize that the language of a Promised Land, even one in which the promise remains largely ...

Author: Boulou Ebanda de B’béri

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 9781442615335

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 589

Eschewing the often romanticized Underground Railroad narrative that portrays southern Ontario as the welcoming destination of Blacks fleeing from slavery, The Promised Land reveals the Chatham-Kent area as a crucial settlement site for an early Black presence in Canada. The contributors present the everyday lives and professional activities of individuals and families in these communities and highlight early cross-border activism to end slavery in the United States and to promote civil rights in the United States and Canada. Essays also reflect on the frequent intermingling of local Black, White, and First Nations people. Using a cultural studies framework for their collective investigations, the authors trace physical and intellectual trajectories of Blackness that have radiated from southern Ontario to other parts of Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa. The result is a collection that represents the presence and diffusion of Blackness and inventively challenges the grand narrative of history.
Categories: History

The Promised Land

The Promised Land

The red of the flag was not just a bright color, it was the courage of heroes; the white was the symbol of truth clear as the sunlight; the blue was the symbol of the wide, free heavens—her spirit's fatherland. The child who had been ...

Author: Mary Antin

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781528781558

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 344

View: 587

The Promised Land' is Mary Antin's 1912 autobiography, which tells the story of her early life in what is now Belarus and her immigration to the United States in 1894. Antin describes her public school education and assimilation into American culture, as well as life for Jews in Czarist Russia. Mary Antin (1881 – 1949) was an American author and immigration rights activist. Other notable works include 'From Plotzk to Boston' (1899) and 'They Who Knock at Our Gates - A Complete Gospel of Immigration' (1914).
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Bound for the Promised Land

Bound for the Promised Land

After more than a year of domestic bliss, a property in the Santa Cruz area was up for sale, and my father did not ... many an itinerant vagabond wandered through our streets asking for a handout, or 47 Bound for the Promised Land: Part II.

Author: Frederick Martin-Del-Campo

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781418460938

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 492

View: 123

The Sentiments of A Woman, is a story of the American Dream, which recounts the struggle and final triumph of Isabel Rivera, the subject of this intimate novel. Chapter by chapter we travel through her life, from trauma to triumph, as she recounts the extraordinary adventures, famous personalities met along the way, sacrifices endured, and the anecdotes of economic depression, World War II, and obstacles overcome, from childhood to maturity, to reach her destination: America. Changing times and fortunes forced her to move, and she wandered, From Mexico to California before settling down in this land of "golden dreams." A true story based on private memoirs and personal recollections. The sentiments of a Woman, Part II of BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND, will chronicle the personal feelings and experiences of my mother---representing the other side of the story, which began with Trials of Manhood. Both novels begin with their parents and how they met, before 1920 in both cases, and continue and conclude with all that they lived and experienced, through revolutions, economic depressions, World War, Modernity and passing fashions, social changes, immigration, struggle, and achieving their American dream by 1960. The books conclude with an epilogue of what life has taught them, and how they see the world as senior citizens, compared to the convictions they clung to as youths.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Leaving Egypt Going Into the Promised Land

Leaving Egypt Going Into the Promised Land

In the day that I lifted up mine hand unto them, to bring them forth of the land of Egypt into a land that I had espied for them , flowing with milk and honey, which is the glory of all lands. Then said I unto them ,Cast ye away every ...

Author: Devan C. Mair

Publisher: Xulon Press

ISBN: 9781600341489

Category: Religion

Page: 76

View: 222

Categories: Religion

Legends of the Promised Land

Legends of the Promised Land

In the United States, one of the promised lands, the “boat people,” the land and sea refugees, availed themselves of every opportunity to meet one another and to speak their mother tongue together, a way to keep their home culture alive ...

Author: Xuân-Lan Nguyễn

Publisher: Strategic Book Publishing & Rights Agency

ISBN: 9781631352379

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 310

View: 624

Legends of the Promised Land is the passionate memoir recounting the forced immigration of a Vietnamese family to the U.S., following the Vietnam war and the rise of communism in their homeland. In her own words, traditional aphorism, and the voices of her children and husband, the matriarch of the family describes her family’s inspirational realization of the American dream, beginning with her lone arrival in the U.S. as a penniless boat person. Xuan-Lan Nguyen tells how for six generations her hard-working family amassed wealth that was all lost when the Vietnamese Communists arrived in Saigon in 1975. Her husband, a well-known lawyer in Vietnam and a seventeen-year prisoner of the Vietnamese Communists, eventually joined her, becoming a writer and orator now living with his family in America. She says proudly, “We have three daughters, now three doctors in the medical field in the U.S.”
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Peasants in the Promised Land

Peasants in the Promised Land

Although they preferred a landscape similar to the one they had left behind , they nevertheless chose land which had resources they had lacked in the old country . Their unfamiliarity with things Canadian extended from mosquitoes to ...

Author: Jaroslav Petryshyn

Publisher: James Lorimer & Company

ISBN: 0888629257

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 363

For many years after Confederation, Canadian governments wrestled with a sorry fact: until the West was settled, Canada was an illogical country. The great nation-building policies of John A. Macdonald's National Policy and the transcontinetal railway could not succeed without a living farm population on the prairies. On the other side of the Atlantic, the Austrian crown lands of Bukovyna and Galicia - part of present-day Ukraine - were overpopulated with "redundant" peasants. Their precarious existence triggered the forces of emigration. More than 170 000 of them sailed for Canada. Life in the promised land was hard. To begin with, Canadians seemed to think that the only good immigrants were British. Some went so far as to suggest that the Ukrainian newcomers were less than human. Editorialists wondered how "beings bearing the human form could have sunk to such a bestial level." But on the harsh and remote prairies, the Ukrainians triumphed over the toil and isolation of homesteading. Those who turned to wage work withstood the wretched conditions reserved for the labour of the emerging Canadian industrial system. As the question of education rights split the West on religious lines in the early years of the century, the Ukrainians were caught in the crossfire between French Catholics and English Protestants. Despite all this, the peasants put down roots and prospered. Peasants in the Promised Land is the first book to focus on the formative period of Ukrainian settlement in Canada. Drawing on exhaustive research, including rich Ukrainian-language archival sources, Jaroslav Petryshyn brings history to life with extracts from memoirs, letters and newspapers of the period. His text is illustrated with maps and historical photographs.
Categories: History