My War Gone By I Miss It So

My War Gone By  I Miss It So

In an earlier era, Anthony Loyd imagines, he would have fought fascism in Spain. Instead, the twenty-six-year-old scion of a distinguished military family left England in 1993 to experience the conflict in Bosnia as a reporter.

Author: Anthony Loyd

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN: 9780802193148

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 435

A “beautiful and disturbing” account of the Bosnian conflict by a war correspondent grappling with addiction and a family legacy of military heroism (The Wall Street Journal). In an earlier era, Anthony Loyd imagines, he would have fought fascism in Spain. Instead, the twenty-six-year-old scion of a distinguished military family left England in 1993 to experience the conflict in Bosnia as a reporter. While he found his time serving in the British army during the Gulf War disappointingly uneventful, Loyd would spend the next three years documenting some of the most callous and chaotic fighting to ever occur on European soil. Plunged into the midst of the struggle among the Serbs, Croatians, and Bosnian Muslims, Loyd saw humanity at its extremes, witnessing tragedy daily in city streets and mountain villages. Shocking yet ultimately redemptive, Loyd’s memoir is an uncompromising feat of on-the-ground reportage. But Loyd’s personal war didn’t end when he emerged from the trenches. Hooked to the adrenaline of armed combat, he returned home to continue his own longstanding battle against drug addiction. “Battlefield reportage does not get more up close, gruesome, and personal. . . . The fear and confusion of battle are so vivid that in places, they rise like acrid smoke from the page.” —The New York Times “This is pure war reporting, free from the usual journalistic constraints that often give a false significance to suffering.” —Salon.com “First-rate war correspondence . . . [in] the great tradition of Hemingway, Caputo, and Michael Herr.” —The Boston Globe
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

My War Gone By I Miss It So

My War Gone By  I Miss It So

The fear and confusion of battle are so vivid that in places, they rise like acrid smoke from the page' New York ... [in] the great tradition of Hemingway, Caputo, and Michael Herr' Boston Globe 'My War Gone By, I Miss It So moves at ...

Author: Anthony Loyd

Publisher: September Publishing

ISBN: 9781910463178

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 319

'Undoubtedly the most powerful and immediate book to emerge from the Balkan horror of ethnic civil war' Antony Beevor, Daily Telegraph In 1993, Anthony Loyd hitchhiked to the Balkans hoping to become a journalist. Leaving behind him the legends of a distinguished military family, he wanted to see 'a real war' for himself. In Bosnia he found one. The cruelty and chaos of the conflict both appalled and embraced him; the adrenalin lure of the action perhaps the loudest siren call of all. In the midst of the daily life-and-death struggle among Bosnia's Serbs, Croats and Muslims, Loyd was inspired by the extraordinary human fortitude he discovered. But returning home he found the void of peacetime too painful to bear, and so began a longstanding personal battle with drug abuse. This harrowing account shows humanity at its worst and best. It is a breathtaking feat of reportage; an uncompromising look at the terrifyingly seductive power of war. 'As good as reporting gets. I have nowhere read a more vivid account of frontline fear and survival. Forget the strategic overview. All war is local' Martin Bell, The Times
Categories: History

My War Gone By I Miss It So

My War Gone By  I Miss It So

Shocking, violent, yet lyrical and ultimately redemptive, this book is a breathtaking feat of reportage, and an uncompromising look at the terrifyingly seductive power of war.

Author: Anthony Lloyd

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 1500750212

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 270

View: 698

Born to a distinguished family steeped in military tradition, raised on stories of wartime and ancestral heroes, Anthony Loyd longed to experience war from the front lines--so he left England at the age of twenty-six to document the conflict in Bosnia. For the following three years he witnessed the killings of one of the most callous and chaotic clashes on European soil, in the midst of a lethal struggle among the Serbs, Croatians, and Bosnian Muslims. Addicted to the adrenaline of armed combat, he returned home to wage a longstanding personal battle against substance abuse. These harrowing accounts from the trenches show humanity at its worst and best, through daily tragedies in city streets and mountain villages during Yugoslavia's brutal dissolution. Shocking, violent, yet lyrical and ultimately redemptive, this book is a breathtaking feat of reportage, and an uncompromising look at the terrifyingly seductive power of war.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

War Stories

War Stories

Certainly , correspondents began seriously to examine their own ethics - making careers out of human misery - but their ... Anthony Loyd , who has reported seven recent wars , called his 1999 book , “ My War Gone By , I Miss It So.

Author: Harold Evans

Publisher: Bunker Hill Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1593730055

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 284

From the time of the Crimean War in 1853 to the Second Gulf War, Evans tells the stories of war correspondents who served as the "eyes of history": Ernest Hemingway, Alexander Dumas, Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, John Steinback, and others. Full color. 90 photos.
Categories: History

Courting Democracy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Courting Democracy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

it unified the armed forces in the country, including the PL, the TO, the Ministry of Internal Affairs (Ministarstvo unutarnjih poslove or MUP) forces, ... 74 Anthony Loyd, My War Gone By, I Miss it So (New York: Penguin Books, 2001).

Author: Lara J. Nettelfield

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521763806

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 860

"This book is essential reading for anyone interested in war crimes tribunals and their place in transitional justice. Nettelfield's wide and thorough research in the literature and on the ground in Bosnia and Herzegovina make this work stand out in a field already heavily populated. It represents a well-balanced and realistic assessment of the record of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia."- Richard Goldstone, former chief prosecutor for the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for Yugoslavia and Rwanda "Elegantly written and drawing on years of meticulous empirical research, Courting Democracy in Bosnia and Herzegovina is a major contribution to theoretical and policy debates on the role of international justice institutions. Nettelfield robustly challenges conventional critical assessments of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and in so doing, changes forever the terms of the discussion about the impact of the ICTY in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Should be required reading in courses on human rights, international criminal law and political transitions in post-conflict settings."- Richard A. Wilson, Gladstein Chair of Human Rights, Director of the Human Rights Institute, and Professor of Anthropology at the University of Connecticut "This work is elegant in its rigor, lively in its tone, and uplifting in its spirit. Nettelfield gracefully moves us beyond turgidly contemptuous or blindly enthusiastic assessments of the relevance of international criminal law. She charts the field's role in post-conflict transition - a modest role, to be sure, and certainly a nuanced one, but also one that fosters democratic development. The book is a must-read for anyone concerned with Bosnia, transitional justice, and the role of law, in life. A tour de force!"- Mark A. Drumbl, Class of 1975 Alumni Professor and Director, Transnational Law Institute Washington and Lee University School of Law "Friends of international justice will welcome this balanced, methodologically rigorous assessment of popular responses to the ICTY in the Western Balkans. With its nuanced presentation of the Tribunal's impact, this work amply identifies missteps and pitfalls while providing gracious encouragement to proponents of international jurisprudence."- Robert Donia, Visiting Professor of History, University of Michigan "Lara Nettelfield has masterfully documented and analyzed the true impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia on Bosnian society since 1993. She challenges conventional wisdom by demonstrating the Tribunal's modest but largely positive contribution to the democratic development of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including the introduction of new social movements for accountability. This book slays a few dragons and introduces refreshing clarity to a very challenging subject." - Professor David Scheffer, Northwestern University School of Law, and former U.S. Ambassador for War Crimes Issues (1997-2001)
Categories: History

Another Bloody Love Letter

Another Bloody Love Letter

Whatever you say, however you say it, you can never explain that despite the fire, the fear, the smoke, the chaos, the killing, the madness and the loss, there exists something far beyond the trite accounting of collective risk and ...

Author: Anthony Lloyd

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 1492934674

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 290

View: 297

'For every war is a secret war, known only to those who were there. Whatever you say, however you say it, you can never explain that despite the fire, the fear, the smoke, the chaos, the killing, the madness and the loss, there exists something far beyond the trite accounting of collective risk and mortality: the best kept secret of battle – the shared and terrible love of it all'.Anthony Loyd spares us little as with deft and certain hand he navigates the reader through the violent currents of the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq, all the while dragging the carcass of a heroin habit behind him, in this searing war time memoir of love and friendship, betrayal and loss.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Trauma Journalism

Trauma Journalism

In 2000, Feinstein interviewed then-34-year-old Anthony Loyd, war correspondent, The Times (London) and author of My War Gone by. I Miss It So. His profile is included in Journalists under Fire as an example of a reporter who, ...

Author: Mark H. Massé

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441195203

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 763

The role of journalists in covering trauma and tragedy isn't new. Witnessing acts of violence, destruction and terror has long been the professional responsibility of countless print and broadcast reporters and photographers. But what is new is a growing awareness of the emotional consequences of such coverage on the victims, their families and loved ones, their communities, and on the journalists whose job it is to tell these stories. Trauma Journalism personalizes this movement with in-depth profiles of reporters, researchers and trauma experts engaged in an international effort to transform how the media work under the most difficult of conditions. Through biographical sketches concerning several significant traumatic events (Oklahoma City bombing, Columbine school tragedy, 9/11, Iraq War, the South Asian tsunami, Hurricane Katrina), students and working reporters will gain insights into the critical components of contemporary journalism practices affecting news judgment, news gathering techniques, as well as legal and ethical issues. Trauma Journalism calls for the creation - through ongoing education - of a culture of caring among journalists worldwide.
Categories: Social Science

Blue Helmets and Black Markets

Blue Helmets and Black Markets

The fact that the city had hosted the Olympics less than ten years earlier also meant that a larger number of people across the world had heard of Sarajevo ... Anthony Loyd, My War Gone By, I Miss it So (New York: Penguin, 1999), 16.

Author: Peter Andreas

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801457043

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 666

The 1992–1995 battle for Sarajevo was the longest siege in modern history. It was also the most internationalized, attracting a vast contingent of aid workers, UN soldiers, journalists, smugglers, and embargo-busters. The city took center stage under an intense global media spotlight, becoming the most visible face of post-Cold War conflict and humanitarian intervention. However, some critical activities took place backstage, away from the cameras, including extensive clandestine trading across the siege lines, theft and diversion of aid, and complicity in the black market by peacekeeping forces. In Blue Helmets and Black Markets, Peter Andreas traces the interaction between these formal front-stage and informal backstage activities, arguing that this created and sustained a criminalized war economy and prolonged the conflict in a manner that served various interests on all sides. Although the vast majority of Sarajevans struggled for daily survival and lived in a state of terror, the siege was highly rewarding for some key local and international players. This situation also left a powerful legacy for postwar reconstruction: new elites emerged via war profiteering and an illicit economy flourished partly based on the smuggling networks built up during wartime. Andreas shows how and why the internationalization of the siege changed the repertoires of siege-craft and siege defenses and altered the strategic calculations of both the besiegers and the besieged. The Sarajevo experience dramatically illustrates that just as changes in weapons technologies transformed siege warfare through the ages, so too has the arrival of CNN, NGOs, satellite phones, UN peacekeepers, and aid convoys. Drawing on interviews, reportage, diaries, memoirs, and other sources, Andreas documents the business of survival in wartime Sarajevo and the limits, contradictions, and unintended consequences of international intervention. Concluding with a comparison of the battle for Sarajevo with the sieges of Leningrad, Grozny, and Srebrenica, and, more recently, Falluja, Blue Helmets and Black Markets is a major contribution to our understanding of contemporary urban warfare, war economies, and the political repercussions of humanitarian action.
Categories: Political Science

Reporting the Siege of Sarajevo

Reporting the Siege of Sarajevo

The magazine became notorious in the 1970s when it launched a recruitment drive for mercenaries to fight for the Rhodesian Security Forces during the Rhodesian War of 1964–79. ... 131 Anthony Loyd, My War Gone By, I Miss it So ...

Author: Kenneth Morrison

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350081796

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 533

The Siege of Sarajevo remains the longest siege in modern European history, lasting three times longer than the Battle of Stalingrad and over a year longer than the Siege of Leningrad. Reporting the Siege of Sarajevo provides the first detailed account of the reporting of this siege and the role that journalists played in highlighting both military and non-military aspects of it. The book draws on detailed primary and secondary material in English and Bosnian, as well as extensive interviews with international correspondents who covered events in Sarajevo from within siege lines. It also includes hitherto unpublished images taken by the co-author and award-winning photojournalist, Paul Lowe. Together Morrison and Lowe document a relatively short but crucial period in both the history of Bosnia & Herzegovina, the city of Sarajevo and the profession of journalism. The book provides crucial observations and insights into an under-researched aspect of a critical period in Europe's recent history.
Categories: History

War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning

War Is a Force that Gives Us Meaning

In 1999 the British journalist Anthony Loyd published My War Gone By, I Miss It So, a book about his twin addictions to heroin and to the war in Bosnia. His account illuminates the self-destruction impulse that is fed by war and drugs ...

Author: Chris Hedges

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781610395106

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 239

General George S. Patton famously said, "Compared to war all other forms of human endeavor shrink to insignificance. God, I do love it so!" Though Patton was a notoriously single-minded general, it is nonetheless a sad fact that war gives meaning to many lives, a fact with which we have become familiar now that America is once again engaged in a military conflict. War is an enticing elixir. It gives us purpose, resolve, a cause. It allows us to be noble. Chris Hedges of The New York Times has seen war up close -- in the Balkans, the Middle East, and Central America -- and he has been troubled by what he has seen: friends, enemies, colleagues, and strangers intoxicated and even addicted to war's heady brew. In War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning, he tackles the ugly truths about humanity's love affair with war, offering a sophisticated, nuanced, intelligent meditation on the subject that is also gritty, powerful, and unforgettable.
Categories: History