Obsidian Ancient Glass Artifacts from Western North America

Obsidian Ancient Glass Artifacts from Western North America

All of these are ancient, authentic artifacts collected over many decades across the western regions of North America. The finders, locations and times when these were discovered is provided, as much as is known.

Author: F. Scott Crawford

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1731489404

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 282

View: 601

When ancient people around the world discovered the volcanic natural glass which we know as obsidian, they immediately began to make their hunting weapons and food processing tools from this beautiful and useful stone. Obsidian is brittle so it breaks easily into manageable size. It breaks to a sharp edge ... down to the molecular level. No man-made material provides a sharper edge. So, it cuts and slices, it shreds and dices. Obsidian is tough enough to use as projectile points for hunting purposes. Whether on the business end of a hand-held lance or a throwing javelin or on the tip of a smaller throwing dart propelled powerfully by an "atlatl" or on the "pointy end" of a smaller stick or reed as an arrow shot from a bow. In the pages of "OBSIDIAN ~ Ancient Glass Artifacts From Western North America ~ " you will see dozens of different style natural glass projectile points, knives and hunting tools made from many forms and colors of obsidian. All of these are ancient, authentic artifacts collected over many decades across the western regions of North America. The finders, locations and times when these were discovered is provided, as much as is known. Some of these obsidian artifacts are thousands of years old, made during the Paleo Period, at the end of the last "Ice Age" and some were used as recently as 150 to 200 years ago during the late Historic Phase, which lasted up until the mid-1800's in the Great Basin and the Pacific Northwest. Full color photography throughout. 280 pages. "OBSIDIAN ~ Ancient Glass Artifacts From Western North America ~ "
Categories: Antiques & Collectibles

Obsidian and Ancient Manufactured Glasses

Obsidian and Ancient Manufactured Glasses

Traceelement analysis of obsidian sources and artifacts of central Chile (Maule River Basin) and western Argentina (Colorado River). Latin American Antiquity 7, 7–20. Shackley, M.S., 2005. Obsidian. Geology and Archaeology in the North ...

Author: Ioannis Liritzis

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826351616

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 785

This edited volume offers archaeologists and archaeometrists the latest technical information, the fundamentals of provenance studies, instrumentation used in these investigations, and strategies for the dating and interpretation of archaeological materials in glass studies. The contributors discuss recent advances in obsidian hydration dating, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy, focusing on the application of these technologies to a variety of glass forms and incorporating studies that look at the social and economic strategies of past cultures. With examples from Greece, the Middle East, Italy, Peru, Bolivia, Russia, Africa, and the Pacific region, provenance studies look at regional patterns of glass acquisition, production, and exchange, providing examples that use one or more instrumental methods to characterize materials from ancient societies. Extensive figures and tables included.
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America

Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America

Rind thickObsidian is a natural form of glass created by ness can be measured by cutting a thin section volcanic eruption . ... Western North America , the most tec- ogy by Donovan Clark of the University of tonically active part of the ...

Author: Guy E. Gibbon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136801792

Category: Reference

Page: 1024

View: 777

First published in 1998. Did prehistoric humans walk to North America from Siberia? Who were the inhabitants of the spectacular Anasazi cliff dwellings in the Southwest and why did they disappear? Native Americans used acorns as a major food source, but how did they get rid of the tannic acid which is toxic to humans? How does radiocarbon dating work and how accurate is it? Written for the informed lay person, college-level student, and professional, Archaeology of Prehistoric Native America: An Encyclopedia is an important resource for the study of the earliest North Americans; including facts, theories, descriptions, and speculations on the ancient nomads and hunter-gathers that populated continental North America.
Categories: Reference

Encyclopedia of Glass Science Technology History and Culture Two Volume Set

Encyclopedia of Glass Science  Technology  History  and Culture Two Volume Set

analyses by many museums and governmental agencies, greatly enhancing the number of artifacts analyzed [4, 5]. ... places along the mountain chains of western North America and the Andes of South America; in southeast Europe, Anatolia, ...

Author: Pascal Richet

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118799390

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 1568

View: 481

This Encyclopedia begins with an introduction summarizing itsscope and content. Glassmaking; Structure of Glass, GlassPhysics,Transport Properties, Chemistry of Glass, Glass and Light,Inorganic Glass Families, Organic Glasses, Glass and theEnvironment, Historical and Economical Aspect of Glassmaking,History of Glass, Glass and Art, and outlinepossible newdevelopments and uses as presented by the best known people in thefield (C.A. Angell, for example). Sections and chapters arearranged in a logical order to ensure overall consistency and avoiduseless repetitions. All sections are introduced by a briefintroduction and attractive illustration. Newly investigatedtopics will be addresses, with the goal of ensuring that thisEncyclopedia remains a reference work for years to come.
Categories: Technology & Engineering

From the Pleistocene to the Holocene

From the Pleistocene to the Holocene

Ancient Long Distance Trade in Western North America: New AMS Radiocarbon Dates from Southern California. ... “Ancient Stones of Black Glass: Tracing Dating Paleoindian Obsidian Artifacts from Tulare and China Lakes.

Author: C. Britt Bousman

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781603447607

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 701

The end of the Pleistocene era brought dramatic environmental changes to small bands of humans living in North America: changes that affected subsistence, mobility, demography, technology, and social relations. The transition they made from Paleoindian (Pleistocene) to Archaic (Early Holocene) societies represents the first major cultural shift that took place solely in the Americas. This event—which manifested in ways and at times much more varied than often supposed—set the stage for the unique developments of behavioral complexity that distinguish later Native American prehistoric societies. Using localized studies and broad regional syntheses, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the diversity of adaptations to the dynamic and changing environmental and cultural landscapes that occurred between the Pleistocene and early portion of the Holocene. The authors' research areas range from Northern Mexico to Alaska and across the continent to the American Northeast, synthesizing the copious available evidence from well-known and recent excavations.With its methodologically and geographically diverse approach, From the Pleistocene to the Holocene: Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America provides an overview of the present state of knowledge regarding this crucial transformative period in Native North America. It offers a large-scale synthesis of human adaptation, reflects the range of ideas and concepts in current archaeological theoretical approaches, and acts as a springboard for future explanations and models of prehistoric change.
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology

Archaeology

Whereas standard analysis of artifacts can reveal a great deal about the past, other information about archaeological ... obsidian, a natural volcanic glass used for many stone tools and traded extensively in Mesoamerica, North America, ...

Author: Mark Q Sutton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317350095

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 605

Illuminating the world of archaeology. Archaeology conveys the excitement of archaeological discovery and explains how archaeologists think as they scientifically find, analyze, and interpret evidence. The main objective of this text is to provide an introduction to the broad and fascinating world of archaeology from the scientific perspective. Discussions on the theoretical aspects of archaeology, as well as the practical applications of what is learned about the past, have been updated and expanded upon in this fourth edition. Learning Goals Upon completing this book, readers will be able to: Discuss the theoretical aspects of archaeology. Apply what has been learned about the past. Identify the various perspectives archaeologists have.
Categories: Social Science

Obsidian

Obsidian

This book, the capstone of decades of investigation, integrates a wealth of obsidian research in one volume.

Author: M. Steven Shackley

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816523967

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 692

Obsidian was long valued by ancient peoples as a raw material for producing stone tools, and archaeologists have increasingly come to view obsidian studies as a crucial aid in understanding the past. Steven Shackley now shows how the geochemical and contextual analyses of archaeological obsidian can be applied to the interpretation of social and economic organization in the ancient Southwest. This book, the capstone of decades of investigation, integrates a wealth of obsidian research in one volume. It covers advances in analytical chemistry and field petrology that have enhanced our understanding of obsidian source heterogeneity, presents the most recent data on and interpretations of archaeological obsidian sources in the Southwest, and explores the ethnohistorical and contemporary background for obsidian use in indigenous societies. Shackley provides a thorough examination of the geological origin of obsidian in the region and the methods used to collect raw material and determine its chemical composition, and descriptions of obsidian sources throughout the Southwest. He then describes the occurrence of obsidian artifacts and shows how their geochemical fingerprints allow archaeologists to make conclusions regarding the procurement of obsidian. The book presents three groundbreaking applications of obsidian source studies. It first discusses an application to early Preceramic groups, showing how obsidian sources can reflect the range they inhabited over time as well as their social relationships during the Archaic period. It then offers an examination of the Late Classic Salado in Arizona's Tonto Basin, where obsidian data, along with ceramic and architectural evidence, suggest that Mogollon migrants lived in economic and social harmony with the Hohokam, all the while maintaining relationships with their homeland. Finally, it provides an intensive look at social identity and gender differences in the Preclassic Hohokam of central Arizona, where obsidian source provenance and projectile point styles suggest that male Hohokam sought to create a stylistically defined identity in at least three areas of the Hohokam core area. These male "sodalities" were organized quite differently from female ceramic production groups. Today, obsidian research in the American Southwest enjoys an equal standing with ceramic, faunal, and floral studies as a method of revealing social process and change in prehistory. Shackley's book discusses the ways in which archaeologists should approach obsidian research, no matter what the region, offering a thorough survey of archaeological obsidian studies that will have methodological and theoretical applications worldwide. The volume includes an extensive glossary created specifically for archaeologists.
Categories: Social Science

American Indians and Yellowstone National Park

American Indians and Yellowstone National Park

I ... traced the mountain of obsidian or volcanic glass from where I discovered it last year , at Beaver Lake , to a ... that all the obsidian in North America , except on the West Coast , must have come from Yellowstone National Park .

Author: Peter Nabokov

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951P009596356

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 386

View: 223

Categories: Indians of North America

Restoring a Presence

Restoring a Presence

American Indians and Yellowstone National Park Peter Nabokov, Lawrence Loendorf ... they led to a false impression that all the North American obsidian, except on the west coast, originated from Yellowstone National Park.

Author: Peter Nabokov

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806154084

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 106

Placing American Indians in the center of the story, Restoring a Presence relates an entirely new history of Yellowstone National Park. Although new laws have been enacted giving American Indians access to resources on public lands, Yellowstone historically has excluded Indians and their needs from its mission. Each of the other flagship national parks—Glacier, Yosemite, Mesa Verde, and Grand Canyon—has had successful long-term relationships with American Indian groups even as it has sought to emulate Yellowstone in other dimensions of national park administration. In the first comprehensive account of Indians in and around Yellowstone, Peter Nabokov and Lawrence Loendorf seek to correct this administrative disparity. Drawing from archaeological records, Indian testimony, tribal archives, and collections of early artifacts from the Park, the authors trace the interactions of nearly a dozen Indian groups with each of Yellowstone’s four geographic regions. Restoring a Presence is illustrated with historical and contemporary photographs and maps and features narratives on subjects ranging from traditional Indian uses of plant, mineral, and animal resources to conflicts involving the Nez Perce, Bannock, and Sheep Eater peoples. By considering the many roles Indians have played in the complex history of the Yellowstone region, authors Nabokov and Loendorf provide a basis on which the National Park Service and other federal agencies can develop more effective relationships with Indian groups in the Yellowstone region.
Categories: History

The Ancient Maya

The Ancient Maya

Several major and many minor outcrops of obsidian utilized by the ancient Maya have been located throughout the volcanic highland region of Meso- america. Apart from the green obsidian at Pachuca, north of modern Mexico City, ...

Author: Heather Irene McKillop

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781576076965

Category: History

Page: 453

View: 758

Thanks to powerful innovations in archaeology and other types of historical research, we now have a picture of everyday life in the Mayan empire that turns the long-accepted conventional wisdom on its head. * Includes numerous illustrations and drawings plus depictions of important artifacts such as the murals of Bonampak and the hieroglyphic stairway of Copan * Provides detailed maps of major Maya cities as well as other research sites
Categories: History