Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin

Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin

PERFORMANCE AND EVOLUTION IN THE AGE OF DARWIN Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin reveals the ways in which the major themes of evolution were taken up in the performing arts during Darwin's adult lifetime and in the ...

Author: Jane Goodall

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415243785

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 294

View: 985

Jane Goodall reveals the ways in which the major themes of evolution were taken up in the performing arts during Darwin's adult lifetime and in the generation after his death.
Categories: Performing Arts

Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett

Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett

... 2008); Nadja Durbach, Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010); Chemers, Staging Stigma; and Goodall, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin. 50.

Author: Kirsten E. Shepherd-Barr

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231538923

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 435

Evolutionary theory made its stage debut as early as the 1840s, reflecting a scientific advancement that was fast changing the world. Tracing this development in dozens of mainstream European and American plays, as well as in circus, vaudeville, pantomime, and "missing link" performances, Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett reveals the deep, transformative entanglement among science, art, and culture in modern times. The stage proved to be no mere handmaiden to evolutionary science, though, often resisting and altering the ideas at its core. Many dramatists cast suspicion on the arguments of evolutionary theory and rejected its claims, even as they entertained its thrilling possibilities. Engaging directly with the relation of science and culture, this book considers the influence of not only Darwin but also Lamarck, Chambers, Spencer, Wallace, Haeckel, de Vries, and other evolutionists on 150 years of theater. It shares significant new insights into the work of Ibsen, Shaw, Wilder, and Beckett, and writes female playwrights, such as Susan Glaspell and Elizabeth Baker, into the theatrical record, unpacking their dramatic explorations of biological determinism, gender essentialism, the maternal instinct, and the "cult of motherhood." It is likely that more people encountered evolution at the theater than through any other art form in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Considering the liveliness and immediacy of the theater and its reliance on a diverse community of spectators and the power that entails, this book is a key text for grasping the extent of the public's adaptation to the new theory and the legacy of its representation on the perceived legitimacy (or illegitimacy) of scientific work.
Categories: Performing Arts

Evolution and Victorian Culture

Evolution and Victorian Culture

3 For descriptions of how images of evolution proliferated in a variety of visual media in the second half of the nineteenth century, see Jane R. Goodall, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order (New ...

Author: Bernard V. Lightman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107028425

Category: Art

Page: 347

View: 398

These essays examine the dynamic interplay between evolution and Victorian culture, mapping new relationships between the arts and sciences.
Categories: Art

Theatre Performance and Analogue Technology

Theatre  Performance and Analogue Technology

Jane Goodall traces the relationship between the evolutionary research of Charles Darwin and popular performances promoted by P. T. Barnum and his ilk in Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order (London: ...

Author: Kara Reilly

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137319678

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 269

View: 104

This trans-historical collection explores analogue performance technologies from Ancient Greece to pre-Second World War. From ancient mechanical elephants to early modern automata, Enlightenment electrical experiments to Victorian spectral illusions, this volume offers an original examination of the precursors of contemporary digital performance.
Categories: Performing Arts

Dis Entangling Darwin

 Dis Entangling Darwin

Baxter, Craig (2008) “Re:Design: Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin and Asa Gray” at ... 265-284 Goodall, Jane R. (2002) Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order, London: Routledge ...

Author: Jorge Bastos da Silva

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443838238

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 919

Charles Darwin’s curiosity had a remarkable childlike enthusiasm driven by an almost compulsive appetite for a constant process of discovery, which he never satiated despite his many voyages. He would puzzle about the smallest things, from the wonders of barnacles to the different shapes, colours and textures of the beetles which he obsessively collected, from flowers and stems to birds, music and language, and would dedicate years to understanding the potential significance of everything he saw. Darwin’s findings and theories relied heavily on that same curiosity, on seeking and answering questions, however long these would take to clarify. His son Francis Darwin often recalls how “he would ask himself ‘now what do you want to say’ and his answer written down would often disentangle the confusion”. In fact, “disentangling confusions” seems to have been the driving force behind Darwin’s scientific pursuits, as he was struck with bewilderment when contemplating the luxuriousness of life. It was also the impetus for this book. The true implications of Darwin’s legacy remain as controversial to the critics of our time as they were to his contemporaries. Darwin’s impact within and beyond the biological sciences is both daunting and exhilarating, and attests to the need for an interdisciplinary approach by remaining a challenge to many scholars in the most diverse fields. The recent revival of his theories has opened a Pandora’s box of different theoretical studies that are particularly receptive to exploring new and exciting angles of research.
Categories: Social Science

Making Oscar Wilde

Making Oscar Wilde

Jane R. Goodall, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order (London: Routledge, 2002), 53–7. 8. James W. Cook Jr., 'Of Men, Missing Links, and Nondescripts: The Strange Career of P.T. Barnum's “What Is It?” ...

Author: Michèle Mendelssohn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192523303

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 330

Witty, inspiring, and charismatic, Oscar Wilde is one of the Greats of English literature. Today, his plays and stories are beloved around the world. But it was not always so. His afterlife has given him the legitimacy that life denied him. Making Oscar Wilde reveals the untold story of young Oscar's career in Victorian England and post-Civil War America. Set on two continents, this book tracks a larger-than-life hero on an unforgettable adventure to make his name and gain international acclaim. 'Success is a science,' Wilde believed, 'if you have the conditions, you get the result.' Combining new evidence and gripping cultural history, Michèle Mendelssohn dramatizes Wilde's rise, fall, and resurrection as part of a spectacular transatlantic pageant. With superb style and an instinct for story-telling, she brings to life the charming young Irishman who set out to captivate the United States and Britain with his words and ended up conquering the world. Following the twists and turns of Wilde's journey, Mendelssohn vividly depicts sensation-hungry Victorian journalism and popular entertainment alongside racial controversies, sex scandals, and the growth of Irish nationalism. This ground-breaking revisionist history shows how Wilde's tumultuous early life embodies the story of the Victorian era as it tottered towards modernity. Riveting and original, Making Oscar Wilde is a masterful account of a life like no other.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Darwin s Pictures

Darwin s Pictures

Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin. Out of the Natural Order. London: Routledge. Goritschnig, Ingrid. 1999. “Lavaters auserwählter Künstlerkreis.” In Gerda Mraz and Uwe Schlögl (eds.). Das Kunstkabinett des Johann Caspar ...

Author: Julia Voss

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300141740

Category: Science

Page: 351

View: 105

In this first-ever examination of Charles Darwin's sketches, drawings, and illustrations, Julia Voss presents the history of evolutionary theory told in pictures. Darwin had a life-long interest in pictorial representations of nature, sketching out his evolutionary theory and related ideas for over forty years. Voss details the pictorial history of Darwin's theory of evolution, starting with his notebook sketches of 1837 and ending with the illustrations in The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals (1872). These images were profoundly significant for Darwin's long-term argument for evolutionary theory; each characterizes a different aspect of his relationship with the visual information and constitutes what can be called an “icon' of evolution. Voss shows how Darwin “thought with his eyes' and how his pictorial representations and the development and popularization of the theory of evolution were vitally interconnected. Voss explores four of Darwin's images in depth, and weaves about them a story on the development and presentation of Darwin's theory, in which she also addresses the history of Victorian illustration, the role of images in science, the technologies of production, and the relationship between specimen, words, and images.
Categories: Science

Darwin s Screens

Darwin s Screens

Evolutionary Aesthetics, Time and Sexual Display in the Cinema Barbara Creed. Doyle, Arthur Conan 1981 (1887), ... Goodall, Jane R 2002, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order, Routledge, London.

Author: Barbara Creed

Publisher: Academic Monographs

ISBN: 0522860028

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 198

Darwin's Screens addresses a major gap in film scholarship—the key influence of Charles Darwin's theories on the history of the cinema. Much has been written on the effect of other great thinkers such as Freud and Marx but very little on the important role played by Darwinian ideas on the evolution of the newest art form of the twentieth century. Creed argues that Darwinian ideas influenced the evolution of early film genres such as horror, the detective film, science fiction, film noir and the musical. Her study draws on Darwin's theories of sexual selection, deep time and transformation, and on emotions, death, and the meaning of human and animal in order to rethink some of the canonical arguments of film and cinema studies.
Categories: Performing Arts

After Darwin Animals Emotions and the Mind

After Darwin  Animals  Emotions  and the Mind

70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 photography in Expression and Darwin's relationship with Rejlander see ... and Jane R. Goodall, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order (London: Routledge, 2002).

Author: Angelique Richardson

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789401209984

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 369

View: 796

‘What is emotion?’ pondered the young Charles Darwin in his notebooks. How were the emotions to be placed in an evolutionary framework? And what light might they shed on human-animal continuities? These were among the questions Darwin explored in his research, assisted both by an acute sense of observation and an extraordinary capacity for fellow feeling, not only with humans but with all animal life. After Darwin: Animals, Emotions, and the Mind explores questions of mind, emotion and the moral sense which Darwin opened up through his research on the physical expression of emotions and the human–animal relation. It also examines the extent to which Darwin’s ideas were taken up by Victorian writers and popular culture, from George Eliot to the Daily News. Bringing together scholars from biology, literature, history, psychology, psychiatry and paediatrics, the volume provides an invaluable reassessment of Darwin’s contribution to a new understanding of the moral sense and emotional life, and considers the urgent scientific and ethical implications of his ideas today.
Categories: Literary Criticism

A World of Popular Entertainments

A World of Popular Entertainments

The Zouave military drill, uniform and performance style were variations on the fighting style and dress of ... Jane R. Goodall, Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin: Out of the Natural Order (London: Routledge, 2002), 8.

Author: Gillian Arrighi

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443838047

Category: Art

Page: 295

View: 404

This groundbreaking volume of critical essays about popular entertainments brings together the work of eighteen established, emerging, and independent scholars with backgrounds in Archives, Theatre and Performance, Music, and Historical Studies, currently working across five continents. The first of its kind to examine popular entertainments from a global and multi-disciplinary perspective, this collection examines a broad cross-section of historical and contemporary popular entertainment forms from Australia, England, Japan, North America, and South Africa, and considers their social, cultural and political significance. Despite the vibrant, complex, and ubiquitous nature of popular entertainments, the field has suffered from a lack of sustained academic attention. Nevertheless, popular entertainments have a global reach and a transnational significance at odds with the fact that the meaning and definition of both ‘popular’ and ‘entertainment’ remain widely contested. Since the late-nineteenth century, class-based prejudices in Western culture have championed the superiority of art and literature over the dubious and fleeting pleasures of ‘entertainment.’ Similarly, the term ‘popular’ has carried pejorative connotations, indicating something common and outside the conventional and highbrow productions of the purpose-built theatre house or concert hall. Irrespective of whether ‘popular’ is code for a cultural product with a folk origin, or a term indicating the mass appeal of a cultural product, this volume’s re-assessment of popular entertainments from a global perspective is timely. The performance research embodied in this volume was first discussed at A World of Popular Entertainments International Conference (University of Newcastle, Australia, 2009) in response to a multi-disciplinary call for scholars to explore a variety of topics relevant to the study of popular entertainments.
Categories: Art