William Langland s Piers Plowman

William Langland s Piers Plowman

picture I've filled in thus far charges that the actual, textual presence of an allegorical personification may be a queer effect; ... Copyrighted Material Inventing the Subject and the Personification of Will in Piers Plowman 20 3.

Author: Kathleen M. Hewett-Smith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135652821

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 543

First Published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Conscience and the Composition of Piers Plowman

Conscience and the Composition of Piers Plowman

26 Studies of the personifications in Piers Plowman have, implicitly, followed Frank's lead by proposing ever more ... (1994; 131–3). 27 For notable exceptions see Griffiths ( 1985 ), esp. p. 59, and, more recently, Scanlon ( 2007 ).

Author: Sarah Wood

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191636486

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 257

Conscience and the Composition of Piers Plowman provides a detailed account of one of the central personified figures in William Langland's Piers Plowman. Previous critical accounts of Conscience either focus on discussions of the faculty conscience in scholastic discourse, or eschew personification allegory as a useful category in order to argue for the figure's development or education as a character during the poem. But Conscience only appears to develop as he is re-presented, in the course of Piers Plowman, within a series of different literary modes. And he changes not only during the composition of the various episodes in different modes that make up the single version, but also during the composition of the poem as a series of three different versions. The versions of Piers Plowman form, this book argues, a single continuous narrative or argument, in which revisions to Conscience's role in one version are predicated upon his cumulative 'experiences' in the earlier versions. Drawing on a variety of materials in both Middle English and Latin, Sarah Wood illustrates the wide range of contemporary discourses Langland employed as he composed Conscience in the three versions of the poem. By showing how Langland transformed Conscience as he composed the A, B and C texts, Conscience and the Composition of Piers Plowman offers a new approach to reading the serial versions of the poem. While the versions of Piers Plowman have customarily been presented and read in parallel-text formats, Wood shows that Langland's revisions are newly comprehensible if the three versions are read in sequence.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Piers Plowman

Piers Plowman

Other personifications besides the Seven Deadly Sins are common to “ Piers Plowman " and some of the French allegories . ... 2. This original and dramatic representation is to be found in all parts of “ Piers Plowman . ” 3.

Author: Dorothy L. Owen

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015000628589

Category: Allegories

Page: 173

View: 461

Categories: Allegories

The Arts of Disruption

The Arts of Disruption

Allegory and Piers Plowman Nicolette Zeeman. long - recognized multivalency of Langland ' s personifications takes many forms and is manifest in many ways . 58 At its most obvious level , this multivalency is illustrated by a ...

Author: Nicolette Zeeman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198860242

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 448

View: 500

The monograph series Oxford Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture showcases the plurilingual and multicultural quality of medieval literature and actively seeks to promote research that not only focuses on the array of subjects medievalists now pursue - in literature, theology, and philosophy, in social, political, jurisprudential, and intellectual history, the history of art, and the history of science - but also that combines these subjects productively. It offers innovative studies on topics that may include, but are not limited to, manuscript and book history; languages and literatures of the global Middle Ages; race and the post-colonial; the digital humanities, media and performance; music; medicine; the history of affect and the emotions; the literature and practices of devotion; the theory and history of gender and sexuality, ecocriticism and the environment; theories of aesthetics; medievalism. The Arts of Disruption: Allegory and Piers Plowman offers a series of new readings of the allegorical poem Piers Plowman: but it is also a book about allegory. It argues not just that there are distinctively disruptive 'arts' that occur in allegory, but that allegory, because it is interested in the difficulty of making meaning, is itself a disruptive art. The book approaches this topic via the study of five medieval allegorical narrative structures that exploit diegetic conflict and disruption. Although very different, they all bring together contrasting descriptions of spiritual process, in order to develop new understanding and excite moral or devotional change. These five structures are: the paradiastolic 'hypocritical figure' (such as vices masked by being made to look like 'adjacent' virtues), personification debate, violent language and gestures of apophasis, narratives of bodily decline, and grail romance. Each appears in a range of texts, which the book explores, along with other connected materials in medieval rhetoric, logic, grammar, spiritual thought, ethics, medicine, and romance iconography. These allegorical narrative structures appear radically transformed in Piers Plowman, where the poem makes further meaning out of the friction between them. Much of the allegorical work of the poem occurs at the points of their intersection, and within the conceptual gaps that open up between them. Ranging across a wide variety of medieval allegorical texts, the book shows from many perspectives allegory's juxtaposition of the heterogeneous and its questioning of supposed continuities.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Traditional imagery of charity in Piers Plowman

Traditional imagery of charity in  Piers Plowman

Denis' allusion to the Apostle makes it clear that he regards the three grades of chastity as a kind of ladder stretching from earthly love to heavenly Iove. In other words, the three grades of chastity are synechdoches for the three ...

Author: Ben H. Smith

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783111400334

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 106

View: 578

Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Piers Plowman and the Books of Nature

Piers Plowman and the Books of Nature

72 as personification 152, 207, 209 Lex Christi, see Law of Christ Liber naturae, see Book of nature Liberum Arbitrium 175, 194, 196, ... 3 as personification 201–2, 208,211 Mercy (see also Love) 4, 110–11, 113, 129, 184, 186, 188 n.

Author: Rebecca Davis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780191084270

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 311

Piers Plowman and the Books of Nature explores the relationship of divine creativity, poetry, and ethics in William Langland's fourteenth-century dream vision. These concerns converge in the poem's rich vocabulary of kynde, the familiar Middle English word for nature, broadly construed. But in a remarkable coinage, Langland also uses kynde to name nature's creator, who appears as a character in Piers Plowman. The stakes of this representation could not be greater: by depicting God as Kynde, that is, under the guise of creation itself, Langland explores the capacity of nature and of language to bear the plenitude of the divine. In doing so, he advances a daring claim for the spiritual value of literary art, including his own searching form of theological poetry. This claim challenges recent critical attention to the poem's discourses of disability and failure and reveals the poem's place in a long and diverse tradition of medieval humanism that originates in the twelfth century and, indeed, points forward to celebrations of nature and natural capacity in later periods. By contextualizing Langland's poetics of kynde within contemporary literary, philosophical, legal, and theological discourses, Rebecca Davis offers a new literary history for Piers Plowman that opens up many of the poem's most perplexing interpretative problems.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Poetics of Personification

The Poetics of Personification

personification fabulation, such as Piers Plowman or The Faerie Queene, are heavily populated with characters named ... 3 Personifications bearing either single or compound word names in a language foreign to the author's proper ...

Author: James J. Paxson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521445399

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 283

An appraisal of literary personification in the light of developments in poststructuralist thought.
Categories: Literary Criticism

William Langland Piers Plowman

William Langland  Piers Plowman

13 J. Hillis Miller, 'The Two Allegories', 362–3. 14 Griffiths, Personification in 'Piers Plowman', 62. 15 Simpson, 'Piers Plowman': An Introduction to the B-text, 95. 16 Anne Middleton, 'William Langland's ''Kynde Name'' ', 50.

Author: Claire Marshall

Publisher: Northcote House Pub Limited

ISBN: 9780746308608

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 123

View: 719

Features the full text of the poem entitled "Piers the Plowman," written by English poet William Langland (c. 1330-c. 1400) from the "Oxford Book of English Verse 1900" and provided online by Bibliomania.com Ltd.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman Volume 5

The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman  Volume 5

See justice , reciprocal Liar , personification , 157 Liber albus , 12 Liberum ( Dei ) Arbitrium , personification ... See also Jenkins , P. Marx , C. , 2 , 3 , 29 , 31 , 47 , 54 , 61 , 66 , 70 , 91 Mary Magdalene , 122–23 , 229 Maskell ...

Author: Stephen Barney

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812239210

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 326

The first full commentary on Piers Plowman since the late nineteenth century is inaugurated with the publication of the first two of its five projected volumes. The detailed and wide-ranging Penn Commentary places the allegorical dream-vision of Piers Plowman within the literary, historical, social, and intellectual contexts of late medieval England, and within the long history of critical interpretation of the poem, assessing past scholarship while offering original materials and insights throughout. The authors' line-by-line, section by section, and passus by passus commentary on all three versions of the poem and on the stages of its multiple revisions reveals new aspects of the poem's meaning while assessing and summarizing a complex and often divisive scholarly tradition. The volumes offer an up-to-date, original, and open-ended guide to a poem whose engagement in its social world is unrivaled in English literature, and whose literary, religious, and intellectual accomplishments are uniquely powerful. The Penn Commentary is designed to be equally useful to readers of the A, B, or C texts of the poem. It is geared to readers eager to have detailed experience of Piers Plowman and other medieval literature, possessing some basic knowledge of Middle English language and literature, and interested in pondering further the particularly difficult relationships to both that this poem possesses. Others, with interest in poetry of all periods, will find the extended and detailed commentary useful precisely because it does not seek to avoid the poem's challenges but seeks instead to provoke thought about its intricacy and poetic achievements. Andrew Galloway's Volume 1 treats the poem's first vision, from the Prologue through Passus 4, in all three versions, accepting the C text as the poet's final word but excavating downward through the earlier B and A texts. Stephen Barney's volume completes the framework for the commentary, dealing with the final three passûs of the poem, extant only in the B and C versions. Subsequent volumes will be the work of Ralph Hanna, Traugott Lawler, and Anne Middleton. Overall, The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman marks a new stage of concentrated yet wide-ranging attention to a text whose repeated revisions and literary and intellectual complexity make it both an elusive object of inquiry and a literary work whose richness has long deserved the capacious and minutely detailed treatment that only a full commentary can allow. Perhaps no poem in English appeals more than Piers Plowman to those readers who understand Yeats's "fascination with things difficult," yet The Penn Commentary will enable generations of readers to share in the pleasures and challenges of experiencing, engaging with, and trying to elucidate the difficulties of one of the towering achievements of English literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman Volume 5

The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman  Volume 5

927, 3 manuscripts, Oxford Bodleian Library, MS. ... 15, 21, 32, 38, 112 Meed, personification, episode, and world of, 102–4, 107, 113, 130, 152, 163, 170, 171, 199, 212, 214, 217, 222, 237 Memoriale credencium, 9, 11 Mensendieck, O., ...

Author: Stephen A. Barney

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812201192

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 508

The first full commentary on Piers Plowman since the late nineteenth century is inaugurated with the publication of the first two of its five projected volumes. The detailed and wide-ranging Penn Commentary places the allegorical dream-vision of Piers Plowman within the literary, historical, social, and intellectual contexts of late medieval England, and within the long history of critical interpretation of the poem, assessing past scholarship while offering original materials and insights throughout. The authors' line-by-line, section by section, and passus by passus commentary on all three versions of the poem and on the stages of its multiple revisions reveals new aspects of the poem's meaning while assessing and summarizing a complex and often divisive scholarly tradition. The volumes offer an up-to-date, original, and open-ended guide to a poem whose engagement in its social world is unrivaled in English literature, and whose literary, religious, and intellectual accomplishments are uniquely powerful. The Penn Commentary is designed to be equally useful to readers of the A, B, or C texts of the poem. It is geared to readers eager to have detailed experience of Piers Plowman and other medieval literature, possessing some basic knowledge of Middle English language and literature, and interested in pondering further the particularly difficult relationships to both that this poem possesses. Others, with interest in poetry of all periods, will find the extended and detailed commentary useful precisely because it does not seek to avoid the poem's challenges but seeks instead to provoke thought about its intricacy and poetic achievements. Andrew Galloway's Volume 1 treats the poem's first vision, from the Prologue through Passus 4, in all three versions, accepting the C text as the poet's final word but excavating downward through the earlier B and A texts. Stephen Barney's volume completes the framework for the commentary, dealing with the final three passûs of the poem, extant only in the B and C versions. Subsequent volumes will be the work of Ralph Hanna, Traugott Lawler, and Anne Middleton. Overall, The Penn Commentary on Piers Plowman marks a new stage of concentrated yet wide-ranging attention to a text whose repeated revisions and literary and intellectual complexity make it both an elusive object of inquiry and a literary work whose richness has long deserved the capacious and minutely detailed treatment that only a full commentary can allow. Perhaps no poem in English appeals more than Piers Plowman to those readers who understand Yeats's "fascination with things difficult," yet The Penn Commentary will enable generations of readers to share in the pleasures and challenges of experiencing, engaging with, and trying to elucidate the difficulties of one of the towering achievements of English literature.
Categories: Literary Criticism