Rabbi Max Heller

Rabbi Max Heller

Max Heller, New Orleans, to Isaac Heller, Boston, 16 October 1912 (?), Box 17, Folder 8, MHP. Isaac's sons, Theo and Edward Heller, both assert that their father had a personality and temperament far better suited for the rabbinate than ...

Author: Barbara S. Malone

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817357665

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 296

View: 961

This biography of a pioneering Zionist and leader of American Reform Judaism adds significantly to our understanding of American and southern Jewish history. Max Heller was a man of both passionate conviction and inner contradiction. He sought to be at the center of current affairs, not as a spokesperson of centrist opinion, but as an agitator or mediator, constantly struggling to find an acceptable path as he confronted the major issues of the day--racism and Jewish emancipation in eastern Europe, nationalism and nativism, immigration and assimilation. Heller's life experience provides a distinct vantage point from which to view the complexity of race relations in New Orleans and the South and the confluence of cultures that molded his development as a leader. A Bohemian immigrant and one of the first U.S.-trained rabbis, Max Heller served for 40 years as spiritual leader of a Reform Jewish congregation in New Orleans--at that time the largest city in the South. Far more than a congregational rabbi, Heller assumed an activist role in local affairs, Reform Judaism, and the Zionist movement, maintaining positions often unpopular with his neighbors, congregants, and colleagues. His deep concern for social justice led him to question two basic assumptions that characterized his larger social milieu--segregation and Jewish assimilation. Heller, a consummate Progressive with clear vision and ideas substantially ahead of their time, led his congregation, his community, Reform Jewish colleagues, and Zionist sympathizers in a difficult era.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

The Quiet Voices

The Quiet Voices

“How to Meet Prejudice; An Interesting Sermon by Rabbi Max Heller,” Times—Democrat, 16 February 1907; “Impressive Ceremonies Mark Eve of Atonement,” Times—Democrat, 5 October 1908; Frances Joseph-Gandet, New Orleans, to Max Heller, ...

Author: Mark K. Bauman

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817354299

Category: History

Page: 457

View: 183

Jews have long been in the vanguard of the struggle for civil liberties in America. But as this excellent new collection demonstrates, the American Jewish community's reaction to the black civil rights movement was less enthusiastic than many may realize or be willing to accept.... Many of the most provocative points concern northern Jewish ambivalence toward African-Americans and integration.... A carefully crafted and subtle collection that will interest scholars of American Jewish history, black-Jewish relations, and the American civil rights movement.
Categories: History

American Learned Men and Women with Czechoslovak Roots

American Learned Men and Women with Czechoslovak Roots

Bio: “Rabbi Maximilian Heller, Outstanding Leader and Educator, Dies,” Jewish Telegraphic Agency, April 1, 1929; “Maximilian Heller,” in: Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 292; “Maximilian Heller,” in: Czechoslovak Jews, p. 270; “Rabbi Max ...

Author: Mila Rechcigl

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781728371597

Category: Reference

Page: 966

View: 352

Apart from a few articles, no comprehensive study has been written about the learned men and women in America with Czechoslovak roots. That’s what this compendium is all about, with the focus on immigration from the period of mass migration and beyond, irrespective whether they were born in their European ancestral homes or whether they have descended from them. Czech and Slovak immigrants, including Bohemian Jews, have brought to the New World their talents, their ingenuity, their technical skills, their scientific knowhow, and their humanistic and spiritual upbringing, reflecting upon the richness of their culture and traditions, developed throughout centuries in their ancestral home. This accounts for the remarkable success and achievements of these settlers in their new home, transcending through their descendants, as this monograph demonstrates. The monograph has been organized into sections by subject areas, i.e., Scholars, Social Scientists, Biological Scientists, and Physical Scientists. Each individual entry is usually accompanied with literature, and additional biographical sources for readers who wish to pursue a deeper study. The selection of individuals has been strictly based on geographical ground, without regards to their native language or ethical background. This was because under the Habsburg rule the official language was German and any nationalistic aspirations were not tolerated. Consequently, it would be virtually impossible to determine their innate ethnic roots or how the respective individuals felt. Doing it in any other way would be a mere guessing, and, thus, less objective.
Categories: Reference

Kindler of Souls

Kindler of Souls

Among them was James Heller, son of Henry Cohen's friend Max Heller, who was a rabbi in New Orleans. There were eleven students in the class, the largest class in the history of the College that had been established by Isaac Mayer Wise ...

Author: Rabbi Henry Cohen, II

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292782578

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 172

View: 485

In September 1930, the New York Times published a list of the clergy whom Rabbi Stephen Wise considered "the ten foremost religious leaders in this country." The list included nine Christians and Rabbi Henry Cohen of Galveston, Texas. Little-known today, Henry Cohen was a rabbi to be reckoned with, a man Woodrow Wilson called "the foremost citizen of Texas" who also impressed the likes of William Howard Taft and Clarence Darrow. Cohen's fleeting fame, however, was built not on powerful friendships but on a lifetime of service to needy Jews—as well as gentiles—in London, South Africa, Jamaica, and, for the last sixty-four years of his life, Galveston, Texas. More than 10,000 Jews, mostly from Eastern Europe, arrived in Galveston in the early twentieth century. Rabbi Cohen greeted many of the new arrivals in Yiddish, then helped them find jobs through a network that extended throughout the Southwest and Midwest United States. The "Galveston Movement," along with Cohen's pioneering work reforming Texas prisons and fighting the Ku Klux Klan, made the rabbi a legend in his time. As this portrait shows, however, he was also a lovable mensch to his grandson. Rabbi Henry Cohen II reminisces about his grandfather's jokes while placing the legendary rabbi in historical context, creating the best picture yet of this important Texan, a man perhaps best summarized by Rabbi Wise in the New York Times as "a soul who touches and kindles souls."
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Inventory of the Church and Synagogue Archives of Louisiana

Inventory of the Church and Synagogue Archives of Louisiana

( 9 ) On February 13 , 1887 , Rabbi Max Heller , then of Houston , Texas , was elected to succeed Rabbi Gutheim . He served the congregation until 1927 when he retired as rabbi emeritus . The active spiritual leadership then passed on ...

Author: Louisiana Historical Records Survey

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:31951001960877B

Category: Jews

Page: 218

View: 637

Categories: Jews

Matzoh Ball Gumbo

Matzoh Ball Gumbo

Malone , Rabbi Max Heller , 34 ; Ashkenazi , Business of Jews in Louisiana , 107 . 19. Ashkenazi , Business of Jews in Louisiana , 167 . 20. Ibid . 21. Ibid . , 166 . 22. Ibid . 23. Korn , Early Jews of New Orleans , 196 . 24.

Author: Marcie Cohen Ferris

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807882313

Category: Cooking

Page: 342

View: 142

From the colonial era to the present, Marcie Cohen Ferris examines the expressive power of food throughout southern Jewish history. She demonstrates with delight and detail how southern Jews reinvented culinary traditions as they adapted to the customs, landscape, and racial codes of the American South. Richly illustrated, this culinary tour of the historic Jewish South is an evocative mixture of history and foodways, including more than thirty recipes to try at home.
Categories: Cooking

Notable Czech and Slovak Americans

Notable Czech and Slovak Americans

Leo Rabbi Maximilian H. Heller (1860-1929), b. Prague, Bohemia, was a leader in Reform Judaism and an early Zionist leader. He served as a Rabbi of Temple Sinai in New Orleans (1887–1927) and as a professor of Hebrew language and ...

Author: Miloslav Rechcigl Jr.

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781665543729

Category: Education

Page: 994

View: 642

The contribution to the development and culture of America by the immigrants from the territory of former Czechoslovakia, be they Czechs or Slovaks, or Bohemians, as they used to be called, has been enormous. Yet little has been written about the subject. This compendium is part of an effort to correct this glaring deficiency. In this compendium, the focus is on religion, law and jurisprudence, business and entrepreneurship and the notable people in the government, with the narration and assessment about the Czechoslovak American explorers, adventurers and pioneers who paved the way for the colonists and settlers who followed them. An important role among them played the social movement activists. some of whose ideas won the respect and ultimately acceptance by general population, to which subject an entire section has been devoted. Among other, you will find among them abolitionists, freethinkers. suffragists, civil & human rights activists, environmentalists and conservationists, climate change activists, philanthropists, inventors and even futurists or futurologists. Their innovative ideas, inevitably, led to the rise of the plethora of Czech and Slovak American leaders, encompassing, practically, every aspect of human endeavor. As stated in the Foreword, this reference will serve as a powerful research tool for many years to come for scholars and all Czechs and Slovaks on both sides of the Atlantic.
Categories: Education

The Price of Whiteness

The Price of Whiteness

... the rabbi of Temple B'nai Israel of Natchez, Mississippi, ignored the concerns of some of his congregants and invited George Washington Carver to address his congregation from the pulpit.44 In 1909, Rabbi Max Heller was denounced by ...

Author: Eric L. Goldstein

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691207285

Category: History

Page:

View: 343

What has it meant to be Jewish in a nation preoccupied with the categories of black and white? The Price of Whiteness documents the uneasy place Jews have held in America's racial culture since the late nineteenth century. The book traces Jews' often tumultuous encounter with race from the 1870s through World War II, when they became vested as part of America's white mainstream and abandoned the practice of describing themselves in racial terms. American Jewish history is often told as a story of quick and successful adaptation, but Goldstein demonstrates how the process of identifying as white Americans was an ambivalent one, filled with hard choices and conflicting emotions for Jewish immigrants and their children. Jews enjoyed a much greater level of social inclusion than African Americans, but their membership in white America was frequently made contingent on their conformity to prevailing racial mores and on the eradication of their perceived racial distinctiveness. While Jews consistently sought acceptance as whites, their tendency to express their own group bonds through the language of "race" led to deep misgivings about what was required of them. Today, despite the great success Jews enjoy in the United States, they still struggle with the constraints of America's black-white dichotomy. The Price of Whiteness concludes that while Jews' status as white has opened many doors for them, it has also placed limits on their ability to assert themselves as a group apart.
Categories: History

Jewish Roots in Southern Soil

Jewish Roots in Southern Soil

Heller quoted in Bobbie Malone , Rabbi Max Heller : Reformer , Zionist , Southerner , 1860-1929 ( Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press , 1997 ) , 48 . 19. For a partial list of southern Jewish officeholders during this period ...

Author: Marcie Cohen Ferris

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1584655895

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 308

A lively look at southern Jewish history and culture.
Categories: History

Czech It Out

Czech It Out

Heller, Maximilian (18601929), b. Prague, Bohemia; rabbi Barbara S. Malone, Rabbi Max Heller: Reformer, Zionist, Southerner, 18601929. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 1997. 240p. Dinnerstein, Leonard, “Rabbi Max Heller: ...

Author: Miloslav Rechcigl, Jr.

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781504920711

Category: Education

Page: 906

View: 381

Czech it Out: Czech American Biography Sourcebook provides a wealth of information on a variety of sources relating to biographical information on notable Americans with Czech roots. Besides the national figures, also included are information sources on significant individuals at the state, regional, and local levels. Beyond that, we saw it fit to also incorporate ethnic information sources, which frequently contain a wealth of information on pioneer settlers and individuals active at the community level. Having in mind the interests of genealogists in individual families and their descendents, a listing has also been provided on family histories and genealogies. Even though Czechs have been living in the US practically since colonial times, no composite biographical dictionary exists about the accomplished Czech Americans. Biographical information about them is scattered in a plethora of sources, which are difficult to find and some are not readily accessible. The present author, who, literally, devoted several decades of his life to the study of Czech-American history, has canvassed hundreds of sources at national and local levels to identify, not only notable individuals but also pioneer settlers who played a significant role in the growth and development of the US. This publication should fill a great void in literature until a comprehensive biographical compendium about Czech Americans has been written.
Categories: Education