Race for Citizenship

Race for Citizenship

The narrative's relentless anxieties regarding citizenship and masculinity determine its representations of the Japanese immigrant family and home, the urban racial ghetto, and the universal space of the nation.

Author: Helen Heran Jun

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814745014

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 678

Helen Heran Jun explores how the history of U.S. citizenshiphas positioned Asian Americans and African Americans in interlocking socio-political relationships since the mid nineteenth century. Rejecting the conventional emphasis on ‘inter-racial prejudice,’ Jun demonstrates how a politics of inclusion has constituted a racial Other within Asian American and African American discourses of national identity. Race for Citizenship examines three salient moments when African American and Asian American citizenship become acutely visible as related crises: the ‘Negro Problem’ and the ‘Yellow Question’ in the mid- to late 19th century; World War II-era questions around race, loyalty, and national identity in the context of internment and Jim Crow segregation; and post-Civil Rights discourses of disenfranchisement and national belonging under globalization. Taking up a range of cultural texts—the 19th century black press, the writings of black feminist Anna Julia Cooper, Asian American novels, African American and Asian American commercial film and documentary—Jun does not seek to document signs of cross-racial identification, but instead demonstrates how the logic of citizenship compels racialized subjects to produce developmental narratives of inclusion in the effort to achieve political, economic, and social incorporation. Race for Citizenship provides a new model of comparative race studies by situating contemporary questions of differential racial formations within a long genealogy of anti-racist discourse constrained by liberal notions of inclusion.
Categories: Social Science

German Immigrants Race and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

German Immigrants  Race  and Citizenship in the Civil War Era

The three final chapters of German Immigrants, Race, and Citizenship trace how the Franco—Prussian War and German unification altered the German language of American citizenship and helped reverse Republican Recon— struction's legal ...

Author: Alison Clark Efford

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316025734

Category: History

Page:

View: 925

This study of Civil War-era politics explores how German immigrants influenced the rise and fall of white commitment to African-American rights. Intertwining developments in Europe and North America, Alison Clark Efford describes how the presence of naturalized citizens affected the status of former slaves and identifies 1870 as a crucial turning point. That year, the Franco-Prussian War prompted German immigrants to re-evaluate the liberal nationalism underpinning African-American suffrage. Throughout the period, the newcomers' approach to race, ethnicity, gender and political economy shaped American citizenship law.
Categories: History

Before Haiti Race and Citizenship in French Saint Domingue

Before Haiti  Race and Citizenship in French Saint Domingue

However, the changes in SaintDomingue's racial ideology were due to more than resentful petits blancs. Their stymied ambitions aggravated the ongoing political debate about the nature of colonial government and citizenship.

Author: J. Garrigus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781403984432

Category: History

Page: 397

View: 742

Please note this is a 'Palgrave to Order' title (PTO). Stock of this book requires shipment from an overseas supplier. It will be delivered to you within 12 weeks. This book details how France's most profitable plantation colony became Haiti, Latin America's first independent nation, through an uprising by slaves and the largest and wealthiest free population of people of African descent in the New World. Garrigus explains the origins of this free colored class, exposes the ways its members supported and challenged slavery, and examines how they shaped a new 'American' identity.
Categories: History

Citizen Internees A Second Look at Race and Citizenship in Japanese American Internment Camps

Citizen Internees  A Second Look at Race and Citizenship in Japanese American Internment Camps

At each step of the way, we will remind you to consider how the concept of citizenship has been treated as a flexible category, with the promise of protections often dependent upon racial or ethnic identities. Citizen Internees is not a ...

Author: Linda L. Ivey

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781440837012

Category: Social Science

Page: 277

View: 445

Through a new collection of primary documents about Japanese internment during World War II, this book enables a broader understanding of the injustice experienced by displaced people within the United States in the 20th century. • Enables readers to see—through primary documents comprising letters written by the internees and banker J. Elmer Moorish in Redwood City, CA—how Japanese-American citizens who were interned during World War II handled their financial affairs • Analyzes the interactions between Japanese Americans and Anglo-Americans during a period of widespread xenophobia and racial tension in the United States • Helps readers to better understand the important issues of citizenship and race in America during and just after World War II • Reveals new information on the day-to-day lives of Japanese Americans while residing in internment camps located in various areas of the United States
Categories: Social Science

Race and Citizen Identity in the Classical Athenian Democracy

Race and Citizen Identity in the Classical Athenian Democracy

most clearly in instances of ostensible violation, when a citizen is accused of having non-Greek,non-Attic,or servile ancestry. Thechar- acterizationofthesetransgressionsservestoilluminatethepositivepole of racial citizenship, ...

Author: Susan Lape

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139484121

Category: History

Page:

View: 409

In Race and Citizen Identity in the Classical Athenian Democracy, Susan Lape demonstrates how a race ideology grounded citizen identity. Although this ideology did not manifest itself in a fully developed race myth, its study offers insight into the causes and conditions that can give rise to race and racisms in both modern and pre-modern cultures. In the Athenian context, racial citizenship emerged because it both defined and justified those who were entitled to share in the political, symbolic, and socioeconomic goods of Athenian citizenship. By investigating Athenian law, drama, and citizenship practices, this study shows how citizen identity worked in practice to consolidate national unity and to account for past Athenian achievements. It also considers how Athenian identity narratives fuelled Herodotus' and Thucydides' understanding of history and causation.
Categories: History

Whitewashing Britain

Whitewashing Britain

Kathleen Paul challenges the usual explanation for the racism of post-war British policy.

Author: Kathleen Paul

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9781501729331

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 949

Kathleen Paul challenges the usual explanation for the racism of post-war British policy. According to standard historiography, British public opinion forced the Conservative government to introduce legislation stemming the flow of dark-skinned immigrants and thereby altering an expansive nationality policy that had previously allowed all British subjects free entry into the United Kingdom. Paul's extensive archival research shows, however, that the racism of ministers and senior functionaries led rather than followed public opinion. In the late 1940s, the Labour government faced a birthrate perceived to be in decline, massive economic dislocations caused by the war, a huge national debt, severe labor shortages, and the prospective loss of international preeminence. Simultaneously, it subsidized the emigration of Britons to Australia, Canada, and other parts of the Empire, recruited Irish citizens and European refugees to work in Britain, and used regulatory changes to dissuade British subjects of color from coming to the United Kingdom. Paul contends post-war concepts of citizenship were based on a contradiction between the formal definition of who had the right to enter Britain and the informal notion of who was, or could become, really British. Whitewashing Britain extends this analysis to contemporary issues, such as the fierce engagement in the Falklands War and the curtailment of citizenship options for residents of Hong Kong. Paul finds the politics of citizenship in contemporary Britain still haunted by a mixture of imperial, economic, and demographic imperatives.
Categories: History

Immigration and the Law

Immigration and the Law

A critical look at the mechanisms, beliefs, and ideologies that govern U.S. immigration laws, and the social impacts of their enforcement--Provided by publisher.

Author: Sofía Espinoza Álvarez

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816537624

Category: Law

Page: 360

View: 269

A critical look at the mechanisms, beliefs, and ideologies that govern U.S. immigration laws, and the social impacts of their enforcement--Provided by publisher.
Categories: Law

Asian American and African American Masculinities

Asian American and African American Masculinities

Through the concept of racial magnetism, this dissertation examines both dominant and emergent representations of Asian and African American masculinities as mediating figures for the contradictions of race, class, and gender in post-civil ...

Author: Chong Chon-Smith

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:75406487

Category: African American men in literature

Page: 256

View: 975

Through the interpretation of labor department documents, journalism, and state discourses, I historicize the formation of both the construction of black "pathology" and the Asian "model minority" by analyzing the comparative racialization of African Americans and Asian Americans in the United States. Beginning with the Moynihan Report and journalistic reports about Asian Americans as "model minority," Black and Asian men were racialized together, as if "racially magnetized," in an attempt to maintain U.S. liberalism and U.S.-powered globalization. The post-civil rights era names this specific race for U.S. citizenship and class advantage when state selection of Asian immigration and deindustrialization of the Black working class helped usher in a new period of depoliticized class struggle and racial realignment. As the state abandoned social programs at home and expanded imperial projects overseas, the post-civil rights moment was a period of danger and contradiction when Black radicalism and the Asian American Movement challenged the understanding that social equality through civil rights had been achieved. Thus, the discursive and representational containment of an Asian-Black radicalism had maintained a form of racial hierarchy and gender politics that reconstituted white supremacy and gender relations in post-civil rights. Through the concept of racial magnetism, this dissertation examines both dominant and emergent representations of Asian and African American masculinities as mediating figures for the contradictions of race, class, and gender in post-civil rights U.S.A. While some reports pair together Black "pathology" and the Asian "model minority," African American and Asian American counter-discourses of solidarity and identification-in literature, film, music and performance arts-link social movements to cultural production as active critical responses to these reports. Selected works and texts discussed include The Moynihan Report, Aiiieeeee!, No-No Boy, Rush Hour, Romeo Must Die, Yao Ming, Ichiro Suzuki, I Was Born With Two Tongues, and Mountain Brothers.
Categories: African American men in literature

The Boundaries of Citizenship

The Boundaries of Citizenship

The book will be of interest to readers in a broad range of academic disciplines, including political science, law, history, sociology, and cultural studies.

Author: Jeff Spinner

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801852390

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 311

Liberalism has traditionally been equated with protecting the rights of the individual. But how does this protection affect the cultural identity of these individuals? In The Boundaries of Citizenship Jeff Spinner addresses this question by examining distinctive racial, ethnic, and national groups whose identities may be transformed in liberal society. Focusing on the Amish, Hasidic Jews, and African Americans in the United States and on the Quebecois in Canada, Spinner explores the paradox of how liberal values such as equality and individual autonomy—which members of cultural groups often fight to attain—can lead to the unexpected transformation of the group's identity. Spinner shows how liberalism fosters this transformation by encouraging the dispersal of the group's cultural practices throughout society. He examines why groups that reject the liberal values of equality and autonomy are the most successful at retaining their distinctive cultural identity. He finds, however, that these groups also fit—albeit uneasily—in the liberal state. Spinner concludes that citizens are benefitted more than harmed by liberalism's tendency to alter cultural boundaries. The Boundaries of Citizenship is a timely look at how cultural identities are formed and transformed—and why the political implications of this process are so important. The book will be of interest to readers in a broad range of academic disciplines, including political science, law, history, sociology, and cultural studies.
Categories: Political Science

Citizenship Over Race

Citizenship Over Race

Author: Robert Trent Vinson

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:870119931

Category: African Americans

Page: 16

View: 748

Categories: African Americans