Reading Victorian Schoolrooms

Reading Victorian Schoolrooms

Because my examination of Victorian fictive schoolrooms involves theorizing space, like the novelists who have inspired my project, I find myself constructing discursive schoolrooms—a series of schools built out of words—in order to ...

Author: Elizabeth Gargano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135861230

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 957

Reading Victorian Schoolrooms examines the numerous schoolroom scenes in nineteenth-century novels during the fraught era of the Victorian education debates. As Gargano argues, the fiction of mainstream and children’s writers such as Dickens, Brontë, and Carroll reflected widespread Victorian anxieties about the rapid institutionalization of education and the shrinking realm of domestic instruction. As schools increasingly mapped out a schema of time schedules, standardized grades or forms, separate disciplines, and hierarchical architectural spaces, childhood development also came to be seen as regularized and standardized according to clear developmental categories. Yet, Dickens, Brontë, and others did not simply critique or satirize the standardization of school experience. Instead, most portrayed the schoolroom as an unstable site, incorporating both institutional and domestic space. Drawing on the bildungsroman’s traditional celebration of an individualized, experiential education, numerous novels of school life strove to present the novel itself as a form of domestic education, in contrast to the rigors of institutional instruction. By positioning the novel as a form of domestic education currently under attack, these novelists sought to affirm its value as a form of protest within an increasingly institutionalized society. The figure of the child as an emblem of beleaguered innocence thus became central to the Victorian fictive project.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Reading Victorian Schoolrooms

Reading Victorian Schoolrooms

By positioning the novel as a form of domestic education currently under attack, these novelists sought to affirm its value as a form of protest within an increasingly institutionalized society.

Author: Elizabeth Gargano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135861223

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 724

Reading Victorian Schoolrooms examines the numerous schoolroom scenes in nineteenth-century novels during the fraught era of the Victorian education debates. As Gargano argues, the fiction of mainstream and children’s writers such as Dickens, Brontë, and Carroll reflected widespread Victorian anxieties about the rapid institutionalization of education and the shrinking realm of domestic instruction. As schools increasingly mapped out a schema of time schedules, standardized grades or forms, separate disciplines, and hierarchical architectural spaces, childhood development also came to be seen as regularized and standardized according to clear developmental categories. Yet, Dickens, Brontë, and others did not simply critique or satirize the standardization of school experience. Instead, most portrayed the schoolroom as an unstable site, incorporating both institutional and domestic space. Drawing on the bildungsroman’s traditional celebration of an individualized, experiential education, numerous novels of school life strove to present the novel itself as a form of domestic education, in contrast to the rigors of institutional instruction. By positioning the novel as a form of domestic education currently under attack, these novelists sought to affirm its value as a form of protest within an increasingly institutionalized society. The figure of the child as an emblem of beleaguered innocence thus became central to the Victorian fictive project.
Categories: Literary Criticism

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature

Several Victorianist scholars not aligned with disability studies are doing just this. Elizabeth Gargano's Reading Victorian Schoolrooms (2008), for instance, attends to “the connections among pedagogy, architecture, and psychology” in ...

Author: Dennis Denisoff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429018176

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 540

View: 720

The Routledge Companion to Victorian Literature offers 45 chapters by leading international scholars working with the most dynamic and influential political, cultural, and theoretical issues addressing Victorian literature today. Scholars and students will find this collection both useful and inspiring. Rigorously engaged with current scholarship that is both historically sensitive and theoretically informed, the Routledge Companion places the genres of the novel, poetry, and drama and issues of gender, social class, and race in conversation with subjects like ecology, colonialism, the Gothic, digital humanities, sexualities, disability, material culture, and animal studies. This guide is aimed at scholars who want to know the most significant critical approaches in Victorian studies, often written by the very scholars who helped found those fields. It addresses major theoretical movements such as narrative theory, formalism, historicism, and economic theory, as well as Victorian models of subjects such as anthropology, cognitive science, and religion. With its lists of key works, rich cross-referencing, extensive bibliographies, and explications of scholarly trajectories, the book is a crucial resource for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, while offering invaluable support to more seasoned scholars.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Victorians and the Case for Charity

Victorians and the Case for Charity

Given the influence of analyses such as Strachey's, perhaps his readers should have taken more seriously his comments ... and Sen- sationalism (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009); Elizabeth Gargano, Reading Victorian Schoolrooms ...

Author: Marilyn D. Button

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786470327

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 509

This collection of all new essays seeks to answer a series of questions surrounding the Victorian response to poverty in Britain. In short, what did various layers of society say the poor deserved and what did they do to help them? The work is organized against the backdrop of the 1834 New Poor Laws, recognizing that poverty garnered considerable attention in England because of its pervasive and painful presence. Each essay examines a different initiative to help the poor. Taking an historical tack, the essayists begin with the royal perspective and move into the responses of Church of England members, Evangelicals, and Roman Catholics; the social engagement of the literati is discussed as well. This collection reflects the real, monetary, spiritual and emotional investments of individuals, public institutions, private charities, and religious groups who struggled to address the needs of the poor.
Categories: History

Schooling Readers

Schooling Readers

Reading Common Schools in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction Allison Speicher. Century Campaign to Raise the Legal Age ... Reading Victorian Schoolrooms: Childhood and Education in Nineteenth-Century Fiction. New York: Routledge, 2008.

Author: Allison Speicher

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 9780817319168

Category: Education

Page: 237

View: 738

"Investigates a hitherto-unexplored popular fiction genre that spanned the 1830s to the 1880s, that of the "common school" story. These stories, primarily published in periodicals and magazines, and typically told from teachers' perspectives, represent the experiences of students and teachers in common (free, unregulated) schools of the nineteenth century"--
Categories: Education

Re visioning Historical Fiction for Young Readers

Re visioning Historical Fiction for Young Readers

... and Roderick McGillis Reading Victorian Schoolrooms Childhood and Education in Nineteenth-Century Fiction by Elizabeth Gargano Soon Come Home to This Island West Indians in British Children's Literature by Karen Sands-O'Connor Boys ...

Author: Kim Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136666261

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 486

This study is concerned with how readers are positioned to interpret the past in historical fiction for children and young adults. Looking at literature published within the last thirty to forty years, Wilson identifies and explores a prevalent trend for re-visioning and rewriting the past according to modern social and political ideological assumptions. Fiction within this genre, while concerned with the past at the level of content, is additionally concerned with present views of that historical past because of the future to which it is moving. Specific areas of discussion include the identification of a new sub-genre: Living history fiction, stories of Joan of Arc, historical fiction featuring agentic females, the very popular Scholastic Press historical journal series, fictions of war, and historical fiction featuring multicultural discourses. Wilson observes specific traits in historical fiction written for children — most notably how the notion of positive progress into the future is nuanced differently in this literature in which the concept of progress from the past is inextricably linked to the protagonist’s potential for agency and the realization of subjectivity. The genre consistently manifests a concern with identity construction that in turn informs and influences how a metanarrative of positive progress is played out. This book engages in a discussion of the functionality of the past within the genre and offers an interpretative frame for the sifting out of the present from the past in historical fiction for young readers.
Categories: History

Charles Dickens and the Victorian Child

Charles Dickens and the Victorian Child

... and Roderick McGillis Reading Victorian Schoolrooms Childhood and Education in Nineteenth—Century Fiction Elizabeth Gargano Soon Come Home to This Island West Indians in British Children's Literature Karen Sands—O'Connor Boys in ...

Author: Amberyl Malkovich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135074258

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 368

This book explores the ideas of children and childhood, and the construct of the ‘ideal’ Victorian child, that developed rapidly over the Victorian era along with literacy and reading material for the emerging mass reading public. Children’s Literature was one of the developing areas for publishers and readers alike, yet this did not stop the reading public from bringing home works not expressly intended for children and reading to their family. Within the idealized middle class family circle, authors such as Charles Dickens were read and appreciated by members of all ages. By examining some of Dickens’s works that contain the imperfect child, and placing them alongside works by Kingsley, MacDonald, Stretton, Rossetti, and Nesbit, Malkovich considers the construction, romanticization, and socialization of the Victorian child within work read by and for children during the Victorian Era and early Edwardian period. These authors use elements of religion, death, irony, fairy worlds, gender, and class to illustrate the need for the ideal child and yet the impossibility of such a construct. Malkovich contends that the ‘imperfect’ child more readily reflects reality, whereas the ‘ideal’ child reflects an unattainable fantasy and while debates rage over how to define children’s literature, such children, though somewhat changed, can still be found in the most popular of literatures read by children contemporarily.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Dickens and the Business of Death

Dickens and the Business of Death

The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime. ... Reading Victorian Schoolrooms: Childhood and Education in Nineteenth-Century Fiction. NY: Routledge, 2008. Garlick, Harry.

Author: Claire Wood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107098633

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 747

First ever full-length study exploring how Dickens's fiction engaged with, responded to and even exploited Victorian attitudes to death.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Power Voice and Subjectivity in Literature for Young Readers

Power  Voice and Subjectivity in Literature for Young Readers

... and Roderick McGillis Reading Victorian Schoolrooms Childhood and Education in Nineteenth-Century Fiction by Elizabeth Gargano Soon Come Home to This Island West Indians in British Children's Literature by Karen Sands-O'Connor Boys ...

Author: Maria Nikolajeva

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135238230

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 467

This book considers one of the most controversial aspects of children’s and young adult literature: its use as an instrument of power. Children in contemporary Western society are oppressed and powerless, yet they are allowed, in fiction written by adults for the enlightenment and enjoyment of children, to become strong, brave, rich, powerful, and independent -- on certain conditions and for a limited time. Though the best children’s literature offers readers the potential to challenge the authority of adults, many authors use artistic means such as the narrative voice and the subject position to manipulate the child reader. Looking at key works from the eighteenth century to the present, Nikolajeva explores topics such as genre, gender, crossvocalization, species, and picturebook images. Contemporary power theories including social and cultural studies, carnival theory, feminism, postcolonial and queer studies, and narratology are also considered, in order to demonstrate how a balance is maintained between the two opposite inherent goals of children’s literature: to empower and to educate the child.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Why Garden in Schools

Why Garden in Schools

School gardens, city school yards, and the surroundings of rural schools. The Journal of Education, 58(4), 80. Comenius, J. A. (1907). ... Reading Victorian schoolrooms. Childhood and education in nineteenth century fiction.

Author: Lexi Earl

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429553950

Category: Science

Page: 140

View: 750

This book delves into the complex history of the gardening movement in schools and examines the question why gardens should be built in schools. It offers practical guidance for teachers to begin thinking about how to approach educational gardening. A resurgence of interest in school gardens is linked to concerns about children’s health, food knowledge, lack of outdoor play and contact with the natural world. This book warns against simplistic one-best approaches and makes a case about the complexity of gardening in schools. It is the first critical attempt to address the complex and conflicting notions about school gardens and to tackle the question ‘what is the problem to which school gardens are the answer?’ Examining the educational theory in which gardening has been explained and advocated, the book explores the way contemporary gardens research has been conducted with specific questions such as ‘what works well in school gardens?’ Based on case studies of a school establishing a garden and another one maintaining a garden, chapters look at the way in which schools come to frame their gardens. The authors suggest that there are four issues to consider when setting up a school garden or evaluating a pre-existing one – wider social context, public policy, the whole school, and the formal and informal curriculum. The book ends with a call for consideration of the ways in which school gardens can be built, the myriad practices that constitute an educational garden space and the challenges of maintaining a school garden over the long term. It will be of interest to teachers in primary schools, as well as a key point of reference for scholars, academics and students researching school gardens.
Categories: Science