Reforming the Art of Dying

Reforming the Art of Dying

The study concludes that the assurance of salvation that these works offered represented a significant change from traditional teaching on death.

Author: Austra Reinis

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754654397

Category: Religion

Page: 316

View: 415

This study focuses on the earliest of Protestant handbooks that addressed the subject of death and dying. Beginning with Luther's Sermon on Preparing to Die in 1519 and ending with Jakob Otter's Christlich leben vnd sterben in 1528, it explores how Luther and his colleagues adopted traditional themes and motifs, transforming them to accord with their conviction that Christians could be certain of their salvation. It further shows how Luther's colleagues drew on his writings, not only his teaching on dying, but also other writings including his sermons on the sacraments. The study concludes that the assurance of salvation that these works offered represented a significant change from traditional teaching on death.
Categories: Religion

Reforming the Art of Dying

Reforming the Art of Dying

work of the early sixteenth century.17 Reforming death culture and the art of dying In Reformation Germany, England and France the new theology based on the doctrine of justification by faith brought about profound changes in death ...

Author: Austra Reinis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351905718

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 371

The Reformation led those who embraced Martin Luther's teachings to revise virtually every aspect of their faith and to reorder their daily lives in view of their new beliefs. Nowhere was this more true than with death. By the beginning of the sixteenth century the Medieval Church had established a sophisticated mechanism for dealing with death and its consequences. The Protestant reformers rejected this new mechanism. To fill the resulting gap and to offer comfort to the dying, they produced new liturgies, new church orders, and new handbooks on dying. This study focuses on the earliest of the Protestant handbooks, beginning with Luther's Sermon on Preparing to Die in 1519 and ending with Jakob Otter's Christlich leben vnd sterben in 1528. It explores how Luther and his colleagues adopted traditional themes and motifs even as they transformed them to accord with their conviction that Christians could be certain of their salvation. It further shows how Luther's colleagues drew not only on his teaching on dying, but also on other writings including his sermons on the sacraments. The study concludes that the assurance of salvation offered in the Protestant handbooks represented a significant departure from traditional teaching on death. By examining the ways in which the themes and teachings of the reformers differed from the late medieval ars moriendi, the book highlights both breaks with tradition and continuities that marked the early Reformation.
Categories: History

Beyond Indulgences

Beyond Indulgences

Luther's Reform of Late Medieval Piety, 1518–1520 Anna Marie Johnson. 98. WA Br 1:407.10–11. 99. ... Wicks, “Applied Theology at the Deathbed,” 347–53; Reinis, Reforming the Art of Dying, 17–30. 103. For more on emotions at the deathbed ...

Author: Anna Marie Johnson

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9781612482132

Category: Religion

Page: 327

View: 367

Between Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses in 1517 and his excommunication from the church in 1520, he issued twenty-five sermons and treatises on Christian piety, most of them in German. These pastoral writings extended his criticisms of the church beyond indulgences to the practices of confession, prayer, clerical celibacy, the sacraments, suffering, and death. These were the issues that mattered most to Luther because they affected the faith of believers and the health of society. Luther’s conflict with Rome forced him to address the issue of papal authority, but on his own time, he focused on encouraging lay Christians to embrace a simpler, self-sacrificing faith. In these pastoral writings, he criticized theologians and church officials for leading people astray with a reliance on religious works, and he began to lay the foundation for a reformed Christian piety.
Categories: Religion

Dying and Death in Later Anglo Saxon England

Dying and Death in Later Anglo Saxon England

They revile pa modigan preostas 78 M. Barasch , Gestures of Despair in Medieval and Early Renaissance Art ( New York , 1976 ) , p . 12 . 79 A. S. Cohen , The Uta Codex : Art , Philosophy and Reform in Eleventh - Century Germany ...

Author: Victoria Thompson

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 1843830701

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 449

Pre-Conquest attitudes towards the dying and the dead have major implications for every aspect of culture, society and religion of the Anglo-Saxon period; but death-bed and funerary practices have been comparatively and unjustly neglected by historical scholarship. In her wide-ranging analysis, Dr Thompson examines such practices in the context of confessional and penitential literature, wills, poetry, chronicles and homilies, to show that complex and ambiguous ideas about death were current at all levels of Anglo-Saxon society. Her study also takes in grave monuments, showing in particular how the Anglo-Scandinavian sculpture of the ninth to the eleventh centuries may indicate not only the status, but also the religious and cultural alignment of those who commissioned and made them. VICTORIA THOMPSON undertook her postgraduate work in English and Medieval Studies at the University of York and currently lectures in medieval history for New York University's London Program.
Categories: Social Science

Luther s ethics in the realms of church household politics

Luther s ethics in the realms of church  household  politics

AUSTRA REINIS: Reforming the art of dying: the ars moriendi in the German Reformation (1519-1528). ... VI, 290 S. (St. Andrews studies in Reformation history) Diese Veröffentlichung enthält die überarbeitete Dissertation, die 2003 am ...

Author: Helmar Junghans

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783525874417

Category: Religion

Page: 355

View: 281

German description: Das Lutherjahrbuch wird von der internationalen Luther-Gesellschaft herausgegeben. Es veroffentlicht neue Erkenntnisse zur Wittenberger Reformation sowie deren Rezeption bis in die Gegenwart und informiert uber die internationale Lutherforschung.
Categories: Religion

Handbook of Consolations

Handbook of Consolations

For the Fears and Trials That Oppress Us in the Struggle with Death Johann Gerhard ... see Austra Reinis, Reforming the Art of Dying: The Ars Moriendi in the German Reformation (1519–1528) (Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing, 2007). 10.

Author: Johann Gerhard

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498274487

Category: Religion

Page: 106

View: 236

Johann Gerhard (1582-1637) was one of the leading dogmatic theologians of his time and was the authoritative voice of seventeenth-century Lutheran Orthodoxy. Yet, he also published numerous devotional works and meditations that were meant to be used in the daily lives of ordinary believers. The Handbook of Consolations sought to provide comfort and encouragement not only to those approaching death, but also to those who provided care for the sick and dying. Gerhard himself was no stranger to sickness and death, having lost his infant son and young wife, and faced numerous life-threatening illnesses throughout his life. In this pastoral work, which is the first complete English translation based on Gerhard's original Latin to be published since the seventeenth century, Gerhard brings together his extensive understanding of Scripture, theology, and church history in a practical and easy-to-understand manual that is as relevant and meaningful in the twenty-first century as it was in Gerhard's day.
Categories: Religion

Dying Prepared in Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe

Dying Prepared in Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe

... Reforming the Art of Dying; Volker Leppin, “Preparing for Death: From the Late mediaeval ars moriendi to the Lutheran Funeral Sermon,” Claudia Resch, “Reforming Late Medieval ars moriendi: Changes and Compromises in Early ...

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004352377

Category: History

Page: 221

View: 606

Dying Prepared in Medieval and Early Modern Northern Europe offers an analysis of the various ways in which people made preparations for death in medieval and early modern Northern Europe.
Categories: History

Strangers and Pilgrims on Earth

Strangers and Pilgrims on Earth

The ritual of preparing for death was one of the focal points of the late-medieval culture of death.7 Many books from that time contain vivid descriptions of the hour of dying and the ... 7 See Austra Reinis, Reforming the Art of Dying.

Author: Paul van Geest

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004224421

Category: Religion

Page: 936

View: 826

Former colleagues and students honour Prof. Dr. A. van de Beek with contributions in this Festschrift on themes that have become central in his theology: christology, theology of Israel, eschatology, theology of the church, creation theology, and freedom of religion.
Categories: Religion

Learning to Die in London 1380 1540

Learning to Die in London  1380 1540

... (“not only amonge seculers but also in dyverse religious”) who know the art of dying, 98 we encounter a religious milieu as dissatisfied with the state of monasticism as of the laity and concerned to reform both groups in tandem, ...

Author: Amy Appleford

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812246698

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 164

Taking as her focus a body of writings in poetic, didactic, and legal modes that circulated in England's capital between the 1380s—just a generation after the Black Death—and the first decade of the English reformation in the 1530s, Amy Appleford offers the first full-length study of the Middle English "art of dying" (ars moriendi). An educated awareness of death and mortality was a vital aspect of medieval civic culture, she contends, critical not only to the shaping of single lives and the management of families and households but also to the practices of cultural memory, the building of institutions, and the good government of the city itself. In fifteenth-century London in particular, where an increasingly laicized reformist religiosity coexisted with an ambitious program of urban renewal, cultivating a sophisticated attitude toward death was understood as essential to good living in the widest sense. The virtuous ordering of self, household, and city rested on a proper attitude toward mortality on the part both of the ruled and of their secular and religious rulers. The intricacies of keeping death constantly in mind informed not only the religious prose of the period, but also literary and visual arts. In London's version of the famous image-text known as the Dance of Death, Thomas Hoccleve's poetic collection The Series, and the early sixteenth-century prose treatises of Tudor writers Richard Whitford, Thomas Lupset, and Thomas More, death is understood as an explicitly generative force, one capable (if properly managed) of providing vital personal, social, and literary opportunities.
Categories: History

Christian Dying

Christian Dying

In Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 93 (2002) 7–25. Leroux, Neil R. Martin Luther As Comforter: Writings on Death. Leiden: Brill, 2007. ... Reforming the Art of Dying: The Ars Moriendi in the German Reformation (1519–1528).

Author: George Kalantzis

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532630965

Category: Religion

Page: 284

View: 215

We human beings are mortal. Our lives in this world inevitably terminate in death. This reality, however, need not cause us to despair, since Jesus Christ has gone before us into the far country of death, giving us hope that this defining feature of our earthly lives is not the end, but instead is an entrance into Christ’s presence and a path to the fullness of the Spirit’s new creation in which God will be all in all. Christian Dying: Witnesses from the Tradition is a collection of essays containing reflections from Christian authors—whether Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant—on the meaning and appropriation of Christian hope in the face of death in conversation with a number of great voices from the Christian tradition. CONTRIBUTORS: Michel René Barnes, John C. Cavadini, Marc Cortez, Brian E. Daley, S.J., Paul L. Gavrilyuk, Matthew Levering, David Luy, Mark McIntosh, Gilbert Meilaender, Cyril O’Regan, Marcus Plested, Brent Waters.
Categories: Religion