Rerun Nation

Rerun Nation

Given the expanding use of past media texts not only in the United States, but also in virtually every media-rich society, this book addresses a critical facet of everyday life.

Author: Derek Kompare

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135877811

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 456

Rerun Nation is a fascinating approach to television history and theory through the ubiquitous yet overlooked phenomenon of reruns. Kompare covers both historical and conceptual ground, weaving together a refresher course in the history of television with a critical analysis of how reruns have shaped the cultural, economic, and legal terrains of American television. Given the expanding use of past media texts not only in the United States, but also in virtually every media-rich society, this book addresses a critical facet of everyday life.
Categories: Social Science

Star Trek and American Television

Star Trek and American Television

142. For an excellent history of syndication, see Derek Kompare, Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television (New York: Routledge, 2005). 143. Kompare, Rerun Nation, 76. 144. Solow and Justman, Inside “Star Trek,” 418. 145.

Author: Roberta Pearson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520959200

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 165

At the heart of one of the most successful transmedia franchises of all time, Star Trek, lies an initially unsuccessful 1960s television production, Star Trek: The Original Series. In Star Trek and American Television, Pearson and Messenger Davies, take their cue from the words of the program’s first captain, William Shatner, in an interview with the authors: "It’s a television show." In focusing on Star Trek as a television show, the authors argue that the program has to be seen in the context of the changing economic conditions of American television throughout the more than four decades of Star Trek’s existence as a transmedia phenomenon that includes several films as well as the various television series. The book is organized into three sections, dealing with firstly, the context of production, the history and economics of Star Trek from the original series (1966-1969) to its final television incarnation in Enterprise (2002-2005). Secondly, it focuses on the interrelationships between different levels of production and production workers, drawing on uniquely original material, including interviews with star captains William Shatner and Sir Patrick Stewart, and with production workers ranging from set-builders to executive producers, to examine the tensions between commercial constraints and creative autonomy. These interviews were primarily carried out in Hollywood during the making of the film Nemesis (2002) and the first series of Star Trek: Enterprise. Thirdly, the authors employ textual analysis to study the narrative "storyworld" of the Star Trek television corpus and also to discuss the concept and importance of character in television drama. The book is a deft historical and critical study that is bound to appeal to television and media studies scholars, students, and Star Trek fans the world over. With a foreword by Sir Patrick Stewart, Captain Jean-Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation.
Categories: Performing Arts

Consumed Nostalgia

Consumed Nostalgia

Note especially Derek Kompare, Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American TV (New York: Routledge, 2005). 9. Gary Edgerton, The Columbia History of American Television (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), 113–130, 139, 144–155, ...

Author: Gary Cross

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231539609

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 507

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be. For many of us, modern memory is shaped less by a longing for the social customs and practices of the past or for family heirlooms handed down over generations and more by childhood encounters with ephemeral commercial goods and fleeting media moments in our age of fast capitalism. This phenomenon has given rise to communities of nostalgia whose members remain loyal to the toys, television, and music of their youth. They return to the theme parks and pastimes of their upbringing, hoping to reclaim that feeling of childhood wonder or teenage freedom. Consumed nostalgia took definite shape in the 1970s, spurred by an increase in the turnover of consumer goods, the commercialization of childhood, and the skillful marketing of nostalgia. Gary Cross immerses readers in this fascinating and often delightful history, unpacking the cultural dynamics that turn pop tunes into oldies and childhood toys into valuable commodities. He compares the limited appeal of heritage sites such as Colonial Williamsburg to the perpetually attractive power of a Disney theme park and reveals how consumed nostalgia shapes how we cope with accelerating change. Today nostalgia can be owned, collected, and easily accessed, making it less elusive and often more fun than in the past, but its commercialization has sometimes limited memory and complicated the positive goals of recollection. By unmasking the fascinating, idiosyncratic character of modern nostalgia, Cross helps us better understand the rituals of recall in an age of fast capitalism.
Categories: Social Science

Netflix and the Re invention of Television

Netflix and the Re invention of Television

Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television. New York, NY: Routledge. Lin, Carolyn. 1990. “Audience Activity and VCR Use.” In Julia R. (ed.), Social and Cultural Aspects of VCR Use, 75–92. Hillsdale, NJ: L. Erlbaum Associates ...

Author: Mareike Jenner

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319943169

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 299

View: 352

This book deals with the various ways Netflix reconceptualises television as part of the process of TV IV. As television continues to undergo a myriad of significant changes, Netflix has proven itself to be the dominant force in this development, simultaneously driving a number of these changes and challenging television’s existing institutional structures. This comprehensive study explores the pre-history of Netflix, the role of binge-watching in its organisation and marketing, and Netflix’s position as a transnational broadcaster. It also examines different concepts of control and the role these play in the history of ancillary technologies, from the remote control to binge-watching as Netflix’s iteration of giving control to the viewers. By focusing on Netflix’s relationship with the linear television schedule, its negotiations of quality and marketing, as well as the way Netflix integrates into national media systems, Netflix and the Re-invention of Television illuminates the importance of Netflix’s role within the processes of TV IV.
Categories: Performing Arts

Ephemeral Media

Ephemeral Media

(2005) Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television (New York: Routledge). Lavery, David. (2009) 'Lost and Long-Term Television Narrative', in Pat Harrigan and Noah Wardrip-Fruin (eds), Third Person: Authoring and Exploring ...

Author: Paul Grainge

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781838715564

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 701

Ephemeral Media explores the practices, strategies and textual forms helping producers negotiate a fast-paced mediascape. Examining dynamics of brevity and evanescence in the television and new media environment, this book provides a new perspective on the transitory, and transitional, nature of screen culture in the early twenty-first century.
Categories: Social Science

What s Fair on the Air

What s Fair on the Air

Aniko Bodroghkozy, Groove Tube: Sixties Television and the Youth Rebellion (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001). 52. ... Derek Kompare, Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television (New York: Routledge, 2005), 66n78. 56.

Author: Heather Hendershot

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226326788

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 131

The rise of right-wing broadcasting during the Cold War has been mostly forgotten today. But in the 1950s and ’60s you could turn on your radio any time of the day and listen to diatribes against communism, civil rights, the United Nations, fluoridation, federal income tax, Social Security, or JFK, as well as hosannas praising Barry Goldwater and Jesus Christ. Half a century before the rise of Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck, these broadcasters bucked the FCC’s public interest mandate and created an alternate universe of right-wing political coverage, anticommunist sermons, and pro-business bluster. A lively look back at this formative era, What’s Fair on the Air? charts the rise and fall of four of the most prominent right-wing broadcasters: H. L. Hunt, Dan Smoot, Carl McIntire, and Billy James Hargis. By the 1970s, all four had been hamstrung by the Internal Revenue Service, the FCC’s Fairness Doctrine, and the rise of a more effective conservative movement. But before losing their battle for the airwaves, Heather Hendershot reveals, they purveyed ideological notions that would eventually triumph, creating a potent brew of religion, politics, and dedication to free-market economics that paved the way for the rise of Ronald Reagan, the Moral Majority, Fox News, and the Tea Party.
Categories: History

Television Studies

Television Studies

Derek Kompare, Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television (New York: Routledge, 2004). John Thornton Caldwell, Televisuality: Style, Crisis and Authority in American Television (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, ...

Author: Jonathan Gray

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745650999

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 178

View: 464

Major short introduction to the field of television studies. Clearly lays out the birth of this discipline, shows its links with other fields of study and explains key concepts and theoretical debates. Includes interview material with scholars whose work has defined the field
Categories: Performing Arts

American Film History

American Film History

Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television. New York: Routledge. Kozloff, Sarah. (1988). Invisible Storytellers: Voiceover Narration in American Fiction Film. Berkeley: University of California Press. Lafferty, William.

Author: Cynthia Lucia

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118475126

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 520

View: 871

From the American underground film to the blockbuster superhero, this authoritative introduction explores the core issues and developments in American cinematic history during the second half of the twentieth-century through to the present day. Considers a wealth a subjects ranging from the impact of television, the rise of the new directors, and independent and underground film, to the impact of the civil rights, feminist and LGBT movements on film, American film after 9/11, and identity politics and culture Features a student-friendly structure dividing coverage into the periods 1960-1975, 1976-1990, and 1991 to the present day, each of which opens with an historical overview Brings together a rich and varied selection of contributions by a team of respected authors, combining broader historical, social and political context with detailed analysis of individual films, including Midnight Cowboy, Nashville, Cat Ballou, Chicago, Back to the Future, Killer of Sheep, Daughters of the Dust, Nothing But a Man, Ali, Easy Rider, The Conversation, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Longtime Companion, The Matrix, The War Tapes, and the Batman films among many others Additional online resources, such as sample syllabi, for general and specialized courses, including suggested readings and filmographies, will be available on publication at www.wiley.com/go/lucia May be used alongside The History of American Film: Origins to 1960 to provide an authoritative study of American cinema from its earliest days right through to the new millennium
Categories: Performing Arts

Flow TV

Flow TV

Television in the Age of Media Convergence Michael Kackman, Marnie Binfield, Matthew Thomas Payne, ... His 2005 book Rerun Nation: How Repeats Invented American Television was runner-up for the Society for Jason Mittell is Associate ...

Author: Michael Kackman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135850944

Category: Art

Page: 304

View: 332

From viral videos on YouTube to mobile television on smartphones and beyond, TV has overflowed its boundaries. If Raymond Williams' concept of flow challenges the idea of a discrete television text, then convergence destabilizes the notion of television as a discrete object. Flow TV examines television in an age of technological, economic, and cultural convergence. Seeking to frame a new set of concerns for television studies in the 21st century, this collection of all new essays establishes television’s continued importance in a shifting media culture. Considering television and new media not as solely technical devices, but also as social technologies, the essays in this anthology insist that we turn our attention to the social, political, and cultural practices that surround and inform those devices' use. The contributors examine television through a range of critical approaches from formal and industrial analysis to critical technology studies, reception studies, political economy, and critiques of television's transnational flows. This volume grows out of the critical community formed around the popular online journal Flow: A Critical Form on Television and Media Culture (flowtv.org). It is ideal for courses in television studies or media convergence.
Categories: Art

Television and New Media

Television and New Media

“Star Trek Rerun, Reread, Rewritten: Fan Writing as Textual Poaching,” Critical Studies in Mass Communication 5, no. ... Sitcoms: Selling the Weidenfeld, American Dream. ... Rerun Nation:How Repeats Invented American Television.

Author: Jennifer Gillan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135965662

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 488

We watch TV on computers, phones, and other mobile devices; television is now online as much as it is "on air." Television and New Media introduces readers to the ways that new media technologies have transformed contemporary broadcast television production, scheduling, distribution, and reception practices. Drawing upon recent examples including Lost, 24, and Heroes, this book examines the ways that television programming has changed—transforming nearly every TV series into a franchise, whose on-air, online, and on-mobile elements are created simultaneously and held together through a combination of transmedia marketing and storytelling. Television studios strive to keep their audiences in constant interaction with elements of the show franchise in between airings not only to boost ratings, but also to move viewers through the different divisions of a media conglomerate. Organized around key industrial terms—platforming, networking, tracking, timeshifting, placeshifting, schedule-shifting, micro-segmenting, and channel branding this book is essential for understanding how creative and industrial forces have worked together to transform the way we watch TV.
Categories: Social Science