Robert Frost and the New England Renaissance

Robert Frost and the New England Renaissance

Daniel Smythe, Robert Frost Speaks (New York: Twayne, 1964), p. 140. 5. Cook, Dimensions, p. 56. See also Frost: A Time to Talk: Conversations and Indiscretions Recorded by Robert Francis (Amherst: Univ. of Massachusetts Press, 1972), ...

Author: George Monteiro

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813182988

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 638

"A poem is best read in the light of all the other poems ever written." So said Robert Frost in instructing readers on how to achieve poetic literacy. George Monteiro's newest book follows that dictum to enhance our understanding of Frost's most valuable poems by demonstrating the ways in which they circulate among the constellations of great poems and essays of the New England Renaissance. Monteiro reads Frost's own poetry not against "all the other poems ever written" but in the light of poems and essays by his precursors, particularly Emerson, Thoreau, and Dickinson. Familiar poems such as "Mending Wall," "After Apple-Picking," "Birches," "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," "The Road Not Taken," and "Mowing," as well as lesser known poems such as "The Draft Horse," "The Ax-Helve," "The Bonfire," "Dust of Snow," "A Cabin in the Clearing," "The Cocoon," and "Pod of the Milkweed," are renewed by fresh and original readings that show why and how these poems pay tribute to their distinguished sources. Frost's insistence that Emerson and Thoreau were the giants of nineteenth-century American letters is confirmed by the many poems, variously influenced, that derive from them. His attitude toward Emily Dickinson, however, was more complex and sometimes less generous. In his twenties he molded his poetry after hers. But later, after he joined the faculty of Amherst College, he found her to be less a benefactor than a competitor. Monteiro tells a two-stranded tale of attraction, imitation, and homage countered by competition, denigration, and grudging acceptance of Dickinson's greatness as a woman poet. In a daring move, he composes—out of Frost's own words and phrases—the talk on Emily Dickinson that Frost was never invited to give. In showing how Frost's work converses with that of his predecessors, Monteiro gives us a new Frost whose poetry is seen as the culmination of an intensely felt New England literary experience.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Robert Frost and New England

Robert Frost and New England

England in February 1915, went on the best-seller list and into its fourth printing during the summer before the poet was completely settled on his new farm (YT, 56). So adept was Frost at performing his rustic role, however, ...

Author: John C. Kemp

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400869749

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 539

Though critics traditionally have paid homage to Robert Frost's New England identity by labeling him a regionalist, John Kemp is the first to investigate what was in fact a highly complex relationship between poet and region. Through a frankly revisionist interpretation, he not only demonstrates how Frost's relationship to New England and his attempt to portray himself as the "Yankee farmer poet" affected his poetry; he also shows that the regional identity became a problem both for Frost and for his readers. Originally published in 1979. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Robert Frost s New England

Robert Frost s New England

Foreword JAY PARINI " Image and after - image are all there is to poetry , ” Robert Frost once said . ... They have caught , as if seized by a parallel force , the imagery of Frost's rural New England , a landscape that exists more ...

Author: Betsy Melvin

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1584650672

Category: History

Page: 88

View: 355

Provides a photographic collection of New England landscapes inspired and accompanied by selections of Robert Frost's poetry.
Categories: History

The Cambridge Companion to Robert Frost

The Cambridge Companion to Robert Frost

Robert Faggen. ( Lexington : University Press of Kentucky , 1988 ) , which , to the contrary , stresses inherent affinities of sensibility and practice between Frost and selected New England precursors . More specialized influence and ...

Author: Robert Faggen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521634946

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 308

View: 471

A collection of specially-commissioned essays, enabling readers to explore Frost's art and thought.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Robert Frost

Robert Frost

Introduction Robert Frost : A New England Life IF YOU WALK DOWN A ROAD IN VERMONT IN MID - WINTER , UNDER A bright blue sky with the air so cold it seems to thaw only as you breathe it in , you see mountains piled up against each other ...

Author: Robert Frost

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 0806906332

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 429

A collection of poems about the four seasons by one of best-known American poets.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Imagining New England

Imagining New England

18. Thompson, Frost: The Early Years, chaps. 25–27. 19. Kemp, Frost and New England, p. 85. 20. Frost to Susan Ward Hayes, September 15, 1912, in Lawrance Thompson, ed., Selected Letters of Robert Frost (New York, 1964), p. 52. 21.

Author: Joseph A. Conforti

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807875063

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 537

Say "New England" and you likely conjure up an image in the mind of your listener: the snowy woods or stone wall of a Robert Frost poem, perhaps, or that quintessential icon of the region--the idyllic white village. Such images remind us that, as Joseph Conforti notes, a region is not just a territory on the ground. It is also a place in the imagination. This ambitious work investigates New England as a cultural invention, tracing the region's changing identity across more than three centuries. Incorporating insights from history, literature, art, material culture, and geography, it shows how succeeding generations of New Englanders created and broadcast a powerful collective identity for their region through narratives about its past. Whether these stories were told in the writings of Frost or Harriet Beecher Stowe, enacted in historical pageants or at colonial revival museums, or conveyed in the pages of a geography textbook or Yankee magazine, New Englanders used them to sustain their identity, revising them as needed to respond to the shifting regional landscape.
Categories: History

Critical Companion to Robert Frost

Critical Companion to Robert Frost

356 “What Became of New England?” The vain wrestling is between the two attitudes, whether we think that nothing will ever perish completely for us or we think that anything can completely perish for us and that nothing is safe in this ...

Author: Deirdre J. Fagan

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781438108544

Category: Electronic books

Page: 465

View: 817

Known for his favorite themes of New England and nature, Robert Frost may well be the most famous American poet of the 20th century. This is an encyclopedic guide to the life and works of this great American poet. It combines critical analysis with information on Frost's life, providing a one-stop resource for students.
Categories: Electronic books

Robert Frost s Poetry of Rural Life

Robert Frost      s Poetry of Rural Life

Houghton, Walter E., and G. Robert Stange. “The Aesthetic Movement,” in Victorian Poetry and Poetics, ed. Houghton and Stange. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1959, pp. 724–30. Hull, Eleanor C. “December.” New-England Homestead 41 (Dec.

Author: George Monteiro

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476619453

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 892

“Wise old Vergil says in one of his Georgics, ‘Praise large farms, stick to small ones,’” Robert Frost said. “Twenty acres are just about enough.” Frost started out as a school teacher living the rural life of a would-be farmer, and later turned to farming full time when he bought a place of his own. After a sojourn in England where his first two books were published to critical acclaim, he returned to New England, acquired a new farm and became a rustic for much of the rest of his life. Frost claimed that all of his poetry was farm poetry. His deep admiration for Virgil’s Georgics, or poems of rural life, inspired the creation of his own New England “georgics,” his answer to the haughty 20th-century modernism that seemed certain to define the future of Western poetry. Like the “West-Running Brook” in his poem of the same name, Frost’s poetry can be seen as an embodiment of contrariness.
Categories: Literary Criticism

Robert Frost

Robert Frost

I ntroduction Robert Frost : A New England Life can get IF YOU WALK DOWN A ROAD IN VERMONT IN MID - WINTER , UNDER A bright blue sky with the air so cold it seems to thaw only as you breathe it in , you see mountains piled up against ...

Author: Gary D. Schmidt

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 1402754752

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 52

View: 457

A collection of poems about the four seasons by one of the best-known American poets.
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction

Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Tradition

Robert Frost and Feminine Literary Tradition

And , as Robert P. Tristram Coffin would put it in 1938 , “ Frost's particulars everywhere run out to great universals , ” and “ what begins as sectional and New England poetry . . . end [ s ] by being poetry wide enough to cover the ...

Author: Karen L. Kilcup

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472109677

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 376

View: 699

Uncovers heretofore overlooked influences and connections in the evolution of Frost's poetry
Categories: Literary Criticism