Sentimental Savants

Sentimental Savants

Indeed, even writers who lavished praise on loving marriages could marvel in turn at a celibate savant devoted to his work. Enlightenment thinkers thus had choices to make, even as many embraced sentimental domesticity.

Author: Meghan K. Roberts

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226384115

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 214

View: 535

The Enlightenment was not an austere age of reason but rather a time when reason and emotion, science and sensibility, public and private, went neatly hand in hand. This book examines how the thinkers of the age attempted to live the Enlightenment, and it is a story that starts at home. "Sentimental Savants "is the first book to explore how and why the savants of the French Enlightenment embraced their family and domestic lives as no previous generation of intellectuals had done before. Meghan Roberts explores the effect this had on their scientific and intellectual labors by cleverly surveying their new domestic arrangements and by documenting their experiments in domestic knowledge-making. Her case studies include the inoculation debates, child-rearing and pedagogy, and family laboratory-work, and together they paint a striking portrait of how sentiment and reason interacted in the eighteenth century to produce new kinds of families and new kinds of knowledge. "
Categories: Family & Relationships

Life in Revolutionary France

Life in Revolutionary France

14 Jennifer J. Popiel, Rousseau's Daughters: Domesticity, Education, and Autonomy in Modern France (Hanover: University of New Hampshire Press, 2008 ); Meghan K. Roberts Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment ...

Author: Mette Harder

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350077317

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 591

The French Revolution brought momentous political, social, and cultural change. Life in Revolutionary France asks how these changes affected everyday lives, in urban and rural areas, and on an international scale. An international cast of distinguished academics and emerging scholars present new research on how people experienced and survived the revolutionary decade, with a particular focus on individual and collective agency as discovered through the archival record, material culture, and the history of emotions. It combines innovative work with student-friendly essays to offer fresh perspectives on topics such as: * Political identities and activism * Gender, race, and sexuality * Transatlantic responses to war and revolution * Local and workplace surveillance and transparency * Prison communities and culture * Food, health, and radical medicine * Revolutionary childhoods With an easy-to-navigate, three-part structure, illustrations and primary source excerpts, Life in Revolutionary France is the essential text for approaching the experiences of those who lived through one of the most turbulent times in world history.
Categories: History

Women and Musical Salons in the Enlightenment

Women and Musical Salons in the Enlightenment

Roberts, Meghan K. Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. Rosand, David. “The Portrait, the Courtier, and Death.” In Castiglione: The Ideal and the Real in ...

Author: Rebecca Cypess

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226817927

Category: Music

Page: 387

View: 503

A study of musical salons in Europe and North America between 1760 and 1800 and the salon hostesses who shaped their musical worlds. In eighteenth-century Europe and America, musical salons—and the women who hosted and made music in them—played a crucial role in shaping their cultural environments. Musical salons served as a testing ground for new styles, genres, and aesthetic ideals, and they acted as a mediating force, bringing together professional musicians and their audiences of patrons, listeners, and performers. For the salonnière, the musical salon offered a space between the public and private spheres that allowed her to exercise cultural agency. In this book, musicologist and historical keyboardist Rebecca Cypess offers a broad overview of musical salons between 1760 and 1800, placing the figure of the salonnière at its center. Cypess then presents a series of in-depth case studies that meet the salonnière on her own terms. Women such as Anne-Louise Brillon de Jouy in Paris, Marianna Martines in Vienna, Sara Levy in Berlin, Angelica Kauffman in Rome, and Elizabeth Graeme in Philadelphia come to life in multidimensional ways. Crucially, Cypess uses performance as a tool for research, and her interpretations draw on her experience with the instruments and performance practices used in eighteenth-century salons. In this accessible, interdisciplinary book, Cypess explores women’s agency and authorship, reason and sentiment, and the roles of performing, collecting, listening, and conversing in the formation of eighteenth-century musical life.
Categories: Music

Born to Write

Born to Write

See Meghan R. Roberts, Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2016). * See Andrew Counter, Inheritance in Nineteenth-Century French Culture: Wealth, ...

Author: Neil Kenny

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198852391

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 437

It is easy to forget how deeply embedded in social hierarchy was the literature and learning that has come down to us from the early modern European world. From fiction to philosophy, from poetry to history, works of all kinds emerged from and through the social hierarchy that was a fundamental fact of everyday life. Paying attention to it changes how we might understand and interpret the works themselves, whether canonical and familiar or largely forgotten. But a second, related fact is much overlooked too: works also often emanated from families, not just from individuals. Families were driving forces in the production--that is, in the composing, editing, translating, or publishing--of countless works. Relatives collaborated with each other, edited each other, or continued the unfinished works of deceased family members; some imitated or were inspired by the works of long-dead relatives. The reason why this second fact (about families) is connected to the first (about social hierarchy) is that families were in the period a basic social medium through which social status was claimed, maintained, threatened, or lost. So producing literary works was one of the many ways in which families claimed their place in the social world. The process was however often fraught, difficult, or disappointing. If families created works as a form of socio-cultural legacy that might continue to benefit their future members, not all members benefited equally; women sometimes produced or claimed the legacy for themselves, but they were often sidelined from it. Relatives sometimes disagreed bitterly about family history, identity (not least religious), and so about the picture of themselves and their family that they wished to project more widely in society through their written works, whether printed or manuscript. So although family was a fundamental social medium out of which so many works emerged, that process could be conflictual as well as harmonious. The intertwined role of family and social hierarchy within literary production is explored in this book through the case of France, from the late fifteenth to the mid-seventeenth century. Some families are studied here in detail, such as that of the most widely read French poet of the age, Cl�ment Marot. But the extent of this phenomenon is quantified too: some two hundred families are identified as each containing more than one literary producer, and in the case of one family an extraordinary twenty-seven.
Categories: History

The Wives of Western Philosophy

The Wives of Western Philosophy

Roberts, Meghan K. Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. The Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. Rossiter, Margaret W. “The Matthew Matilda Effect in Science.” Social Studies of Science 23, no.

Author: Jennifer Forestal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000283464

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 339

The Wives of Western Philosophy examines the lives and experiences of the wives and women associated with nine distinct political thinkers—from Socrates to Marx—in order to explore the gendered patterns of intellectual labor that permeate the foundations of Western political thought. Organized chronologically and representative of three eras in the history of political thought (Ancient, Early Modern, and Modern), nine critical biographical chapters explore the everyday acts of intellectual labor and partnership involving these "wives of the canon." Taking seriously their narratives as intimate partners reveals that wives have labored in remarkable ways throughout the history of political thought. In some cases, their labors mark the conceptual boundaries of political life; in others, they serve as uncredited resources for the production of political ideas. In all instances, however, these wives and intimates are pushed to the margins of the history of political thought. The Wives of Western Philosophy brings these women to the center of scholarly interest. In so doing, it provides new insights into the intellectual biographies of some of the most famed men in political theory while also raising important questions about the gendered politics of intellectual labor which shape our receptions of canonical texts and thinkers, and which sustain the academy even today.
Categories: Political Science

A Companion to Global Gender History

A Companion to Global Gender History

Roberts, Meghan K. (2016) Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. Chicago : University of Chicago Press. Schiebinger, Londa L. (1993) Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science.

Author: Teresa A. Meade

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119535829

Category: Social Science

Page: 672

View: 559

Provides a completely updated survey of the major issues in gender history from geographical, chronological, and topical perspectives This new edition examines the history of women over thousands of years, studies their interaction with men in a gendered world, and looks at the role of gender in shaping human behavior. It includes thematic essays that offer a broad foundation for key issues such as family, labor, sexuality, race, and material culture, followed by chronological and regional essays stretching from the earliest human societies to the contemporary period. The book offers readers a diverse selection of viewpoints from an authoritative team of international authors and reflects questions that have been explored in different cultural and historiographic traditions. Filled with contributions from both scholars and teachers, A Companion to Global Gender History, Second Edition makes difficult concepts understandable to all levels of students. It presents evidence for complex assertions regarding gender identity, and grapples with evolving notions of gender construction. In addition, each chapter includes suggestions for further reading in order to provide readers with the necessary tools to explore the topic further. Features newly updated and brand-new chapters filled with both thematic and chronological-geographic essays Discusses recent trends in gender history, including material culture, sexuality, transnational developments, science, and intersectionality Presents a diversity of viewpoints, with chapters by scholars from across the world A Companion to Global Gender History is an excellent book for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students involved in gender studies and history programs. It will also appeal to more advanced scholars seeking an introduction to the field.
Categories: Social Science

The Color of Equality

The Color of Equality

On the rise of new conceptions of the family, its more egalitarian dimensions, and its place in Enlightenment culture in the French case, see Meghan K. Roberts, Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France ...

Author: Devin J. Vartija

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812299670

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 650

The Enlightenment is often either praised as the wellspring of modern egalitarianism or condemned as the cradle of scientific racism. How should we make sense of this paradox? The Color of Equality is the first book to investigate both the inclusive language of common humanity and the hierarchical language of race in Enlightenment thought, seeking to understand how eighteenth-century thinkers themselves made sense of these tensions. Using three major Enlightenment encyclopedias from England, France, and Switzerland, the book provides a rich contextualization of the conflicting ideas of equality and race in eighteenth-century thought. Enlightenment thinkers used physical features to categorize humanity into novel "racial" groups in a discourse that was imbued with Eurocentric aesthetic and moral judgments. Simultaneously, however, these very same thinkers politicized equality by putting it to new uses, such as a vitriolic denunciation of slavery and inhumane treatment that was grounded in the nascent philosophy of human rights. Vartija contends that the tension between Enlightenment ideas of race and equality can best be explained by these thinkers' attempt to provide a naturalistic account of humanity, including both our physical and moral attributes. Enlightenment racial classification fits into the novel inclusion of humanity in histories of nature, while the search for the origins of morality in social experience alone lent equality a normative authority it had not previously possessed. Eschewing straightforward approbation or blame of the Enlightenment, The Color of Equality demonstrates that our present-day thinking about human physical and cultural diversity continues to be deeply informed by an eighteenth-century European intellectual revolution with global ramifications.
Categories: History

New Horizons for Early Modern European Scholarship

New Horizons for Early Modern European Scholarship

Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Roberts, Sean. 2013. Printing a Mediterranean World: Florence, Constantinople, and the Renaissance of Geography.

Author: Ann Blair

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421440934

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 112

"This edited collection assembles a set of essays investigating the past, present, and future historiography of scholars who write about the cultural and intellectual history of early modern Europe. Contributors examine how scholars in recent decades have broken down traditional boundaries imposed on this period by exploring shifting conceptions of periodization, geography, genre, and evidence"--
Categories: History

Sex in an Old Regime City

Sex in an Old Regime City

Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. Roelens, Jonas. “A Woman Like Any Other: Female Sodomy, Hermaphroditism, and Witchcraft in Seventeenth- Century Bruges.

Author: Julie Hardwick

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190945206

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 873

Our ideas about the long histories of young couples' relationships and women's efforts to manage their reproductive health are often premised on the notion of a powerful sexual double standard. In Sex in an Old Regime City, Julie Hardwick offers a major reframing of the history of young people's intimacy. Based on legal records from the city of Lyon, Hardwick uncovers the relationships of young workers before marriage and after pregnancy occurred, even if marriage did not follow, and finds that communities treated these occurrences without stigmatizing or moralizing. She finds a hidden world of strategies young couples enacted when they faced an untimely pregnancy. If they could not or would not marry, they sometimes tried to terminate pregnancies, to make the newborn go away by a variety of measures, or to charge the infant to local welfare institutions. Far from being isolated, couples drew on the resources of local communities and networks. Clerics, midwives, wet nurses, landladies, lawyers, parents, and male partners in and outside the city offered pragmatic, sympathetic ways to help young, unmarried pregnant women deal with their situations and hold young men responsible for the reproductive consequences of their sexual activity. This was not merely emotional work; those involved were financially compensated. These support systems ensured that the women could resume their jobs and usually marry later, without long-term costs. In doing so, communities managed and minimized the disruptions and consequences even of cases of abandonment and unprosecuted infanticide. This richly textured study re-thinks the ways in which fundamental issues of intimacy and gendered power were entwined with families, communities, and religious and secular institutions at all levels from households to neighborhoods to the state.
Categories: History

The Empress and the English Doctor

The Empress and the English Doctor

768; quoted in Roberts, M. K., Sentimental Savants: Philosophical Families in Enlightenment France (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016), p. 77. 18 Roman, Jean-Joseph-Thérèse (M. l'abbé Roman), L'inoculation, poème en quatre ...

Author: Lucy Ward

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780861542468

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 680

‘It is hard to imagine a more timely or important book… a must-read’ Jojo Moyes ‘A rich and wonderfully urgent work of history’ Tristram Hunt A killer virus…an all-powerful Empress…an encounter cloaked in secrecy…the astonishing true story. Within living memory, smallpox was a dreaded disease. Over human history it has killed untold millions. Back in the eighteenth century, as epidemics swept Europe, the first rumours emerged of an effective treatment: a mysterious method called inoculation. But a key problem remained: convincing people to accept the preventative remedy, the forerunner of vaccination. Arguments raged over risks and benefits, and public resistance ran high. As smallpox ravaged her empire and threatened her court, Catherine the Great took the momentous decision to summon the Quaker physician Thomas Dimsdale to St Petersburg to carry out a secret mission that would transform both their lives. Lucy Ward expertly unveils the extraordinary story of Enlightenment ideals, female leadership and the fight to promote science over superstition. ‘A truly fascinating book that reads like a thriller’ Venki Ramakrishnan
Categories: History