Charlie Siringo s West

Charlie Siringo s West

I 4 At first Shanghai Pierce believed that the Lunn brothers were friends , but eventually discovered that they were hijacking his and his neighbors ' already branded cattle for slaughter in order to sell their hides and tallow .

Author: Howard Roberts Lamar

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826336698

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 370

View: 578

Charlie Siringo (1855-1928) lived the quintessential life of adventure on the American frontier as a cowboy, Pinkerton detective, writer, and later as a consultant for early western films. Siringo was one of the most attractive, bold, and original characters to live and flourish in the final decades of the Wild West. Siringo's love of the cattle business and of cowboy life were so great that in 1885 he published a rollicking, picaresque account of his experiences in A Texas Cowboy, or Fifteen Years on the Hurricane Deck of a Spanish Pony--Taken From Real Life, which Will Rogers dubbed The Cowboy's Bible. In short, Siringo was a key player in shaping the romantic image of the Wild West cowboy. Howard Lamar's biography deftly shares Siringo's story with historians and the general public interested in the American West. Lamar's account is structured within seventy-five pivotal years of western history, from the Civil War in Texas to Hollywood's glorification of the West in the 1920s. Siringo was not a mere observer, but a participant in major historical events including the Coeur d'Alene mining strikes of the 1890s and Big Bill Haywood's trial in 1907. Within this framework, Lamar focuses on Siringo's youthful struggles to employ his abundant athleticism and ambitions and how Siringo's varied experiences helped develop the compelling national myth of the cowboy.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Black Cowboys Of Texas

Black Cowboys Of Texas

11 Neptune's grandson , Bill Holmes , recalls that Sarah worked for either Shanghai or his brother Jonathan at the original Pierce brothers ranch , El Rancho Grande . 12 Neptune had three brothers , Arthur Green , Horace " Dick " Holmes ...

Author: Sara R. Massey

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 158544443X

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 777

Offers twenty-four essays about African American men and women who worked in the Texas cattle industry from the slave days of the mid-19th century through the early 20th century.
Categories: History

The American West

The American West

“Them things make me lookjust like an old Shanghai roosterl” Pierce's ranch was in the Texas coastland ranching country on Matagorda Bay, and his herds of Matagorda steers were known in all the Kansas trail towns as “Shanghai Pierce's ...

Author: Dee Brown

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781471109331

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 952

As the railroads opened up the American West to settlers in the last half of the 19th Century, the Plains Indians made their final stand and cattle ranches spread from Texas to Montana. Eminent Western author Dee Brown here illuminates the struggle between these three groups as they fought for a place in this new landscape. The result is both a spirited national saga and an authoritative historical account of the drive for order in an uncharted wilderness, illustrated throughout with maps, photographs and ephemera from the period.
Categories: History

Texas Tales

Texas Tales

This spelled the beginning of Shanghai Pierce's cattle acquisitions. At the end of the Civil War, when some of the men bragged about their accomplishments and tried to tease Shanghai about being the regimental butcher, he boasted: “By ...

Author: Myra Hargrave McIlvain

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN: 9781632931634

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 234

View: 367

These tales trace the Texas story, from Cabeza de Vaca who trekked barefoot across the country recording the first accounts of Indian life, to impresarios like Stephen F. Austin and Don Martín DeLeón who brought settlers into Mexican Texas. There are visionaries like Padre José Nicolás Ballí, the Singer family, and Sam Robertson, who tried and failed to develop Padre Island into the wonderland that it is today. There are legendary characters like Sally Skull who had five husbands and may have killed some of them, and Josiah Wilbarger who was scalped and lived another ten years to tell about it. Also included are the stories of Shanghai Pierce, cattleman extraordinaire, who had no qualms about rounding up other folks’ calves, and Tol Barret who drilled Texas’ first oil well over thirty years before Spindletop changed the world. The Sanctified Sisters got rich running a commune for women, and millionaire oilman Edgar B. Davis gave away his money as fast as he made it. Sam Houston, Jean Lafitte, Antonio López de Santa Anna, Lucy Kidd-Key, Minnie Fisher Cunningham, all these characters and many more—early-day adventurers, Civil War heroes, and latter-day artists and musicians—created the patchwork called Texas.
Categories: Biography & Autobiography

Cow People

Cow People

3 Shanghai Pierce and the Flapjacks O F ALL THE old - time cowmen of open range days Shanghai Pierce , with the possible exception of Charlie Goodnight , has come nearer becoming a legend than any other . They were opposites , Goodnight ...

Author: J. Frank Dobie

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292710607

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 507

Records the reminiscences of the old-time cow people of Texas and the bygone days of the open range.
Categories: History

The Comacrib Directory of China

The Comacrib Directory of China

Plant , L. , Linotype & Machinery , Ltd , Shanghai Pierce , H. B. , Andersen Meyer & Co. , Ltd. , S'hai . Plappert , Hertha Sister , Surg . & Gynacologist T'tao . Pierce , M. R , Meth . Epis . Mis . , Foochow .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B592912

Category: China

Page:

View: 878

Categories: China

The Trail Drivers of Texas

The Trail Drivers of Texas

SHANGHAI PIERCE Of this remarkable character George W. Saunders says: “Col. Shanghai Pierce has a record in the cattle industry never surpassed and I doubt if ever equaled by any man. I spent ten years hunting his photo, and had about ...

Author:

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292793170

Category: History

Page: 1117

View: 354

“For 60 years, [it] has been considered the most monumental single source on the old-time Texas trail drives north to Kansas and beyond.” —The Dallas Morning News These are the chronicles of the trail drivers of Texas—those rugged men and, sometimes, women—who drove cattle and horses up the trails from Texas to northern markets in the late 1800s. Gleaned from members of the Old Time Trail Drivers’ Association, these hundreds of real-life stories—some humorous, some chilling, some rambling, all interesting—form an invaluable cornerstone to the literature, history, and folklore of Texas and the West. First published in the 1920s and reissued by the University of Texas Press in 1985, this classic work is now available in an ebook edition that contains the full text, historical illustrations, and name index of the hardcover edition. “The essential starting point for any study of Texas trail driving days. Walter Prescott Webb called it ‘Absolutely the best source there is on the cattle trail . . .’” —Basic Texas Books “A book of recollections written by the trail drivers themselves. It has been declared that this volume will prove to be the storehouse of historians and novelists for generations.” —J. Marvin Hunter’s Frontier Times Magazine “A collection of narrative sketches of early cowboys and their experiences in driving herds of cattle through the unfenced Texas prairies to northern markets. They are true narratives told by the cowpunchers who experienced the long rides.” —Texas Proud
Categories: History

Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography P Z

Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography  P Z

Toward the close of his life Shanghai employed San Antonio sculptor , Ed Teich , for $ 2,500 to fashion a statue of Pierce , larger than life - size , to be placed over his grave . Asked why he had done so , Pierce is said to have ...

Author: Dan L. Thrapp

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803294204

Category: History

Page: 1698

View: 656

Includes biographical information on 4,500 individuals associated with the frontier
Categories: History

The Negro Cowboys

The Negro Cowboys

Men like Colonel Goodnight and Shanghai Pierce rounded up thousands of cattle for drives to markets they hoped they could find . George Saunders , an old trail driver , waited nearly fifty years before he wrote his description of ...

Author: Philip Durham

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803265603

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 191

More than five thousand Negro cowboys joined the round-ups and served on the ranch crews in the cattleman era of the West. Lured by the open range, the chance for regular wages, and the opportunity to start new lives, they made vital contributions to the transformation of the West. They, their predecessors, and their successors rode on the long cattle drives, joined the cavalry, set up small businesses, fought on both sides of the law. Some of them became famous: Jim Beckwourth, the mountain man; Bill Pickett, king of the rodeo; Cherokee Bill, the most dangerous man in Indian Territory; and Nat Love, who styled himself "Deadwood Dick." They could hold their own with any creature, man or beast, that got in the way of a cattle drive. They worked hard, thought fast, and met or set the highest standards for cowboys and range riders.
Categories: History

Rawhide Texas

Rawhide Texas

One Kansan wrote of his “earsplitting voice, more piercing than a locomotive whistle, more noisy than a steam calliope. ... Shanghai Pierce sought ways to remove the ticks which caused cattle fever and toured Europe in search of cattle ...

Author: Wayne Gard

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806153766

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 340

What makes a Texan tick? The answer can be found not in military and political histories, but in the social history of the people of Texas—the story of their long, heroic battle to conquer challenging conditions as America’s frontier pushed westward. Pioneer settlers grappled with summer droughts and winter blizzards, often fighting for their lives against Comanche Indians or wild animals. Unknown diseases killed the livestock. Prairie fires destroyed fields and pastures, and clouds of grasshoppers devoured crops. To beat these odds, early settlers had to be as tough as the rawhide they braided into quirts or lariats—for only the strong survived. All Texans shared in the hard life of the frontier. Picture, if you will, a circuit-riding preacher swimming his horse across swollen streams to conduct a camp meeting. A doctor as he rides fifty miles or more through rough country to set a broken bone or deliver a baby, or a schoolteacher risking her life to protect her pupils during an Indian raid. Or a newspaper editor, shot in the back for telling the painful truth. These—any many more—were the people who built Texas. Wayne Gard portrays them in informal sketches of pioneer life on the Texas frontier, illuminating the still-emerging Texas character. What makes a Texan tick? You’ll find part of the answer in Rawhide Texas.
Categories: History