Sources of Chinese Economic Growth 1978 1996

Sources of Chinese Economic Growth  1978 1996

From 1976 to 1997, Chinese economic growth was very fast. Chris Bramall argues that this can only be partly explained by the conventional argument for trade, foreign direct investment, and the mobilisation of surplus labour.

Author: Chris Bramall

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: STANFORD:36105028666522

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 558

View: 283

From 1976 to 1997, Chinese economic growth was very fast. Chris Bramall argues that this can only be partly explained by the conventional argument for trade, foreign direct investment, and the mobilisation of surplus labour. He argues that growth has been driven by China's state-led industrial policy.
Categories: Business & Economics

Sources of Chinese Economic Growth 1978 1996

Sources of Chinese Economic Growth  1978 1996

This book therefore goes beyond the 'development state' approach to argue that state autonomy in China reflected the remarkably equal distribution of income and wealth at the end of the 1970s and, paradoxically, the destruction of party ...

Author: Chris Bramall

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191522802

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 568

View: 973

This analysis of the political economy of growth in the era of Deng Xiaoping takes issue with the growth-accounting methodologies and market-centred explanations which characterize so much of the literature on transition-era China. By adopting an approach which echoes the pioneering work of Chalmers Johnson, Alice Amsden, and Robert Wade on other East Asian Economies, and which makes full use of the rich statistical materials that have become available since 1978, this book shows that Chinese growth was driven by a combination of state-led industrial policy and the favourable infrastructural legacies of the Maoist era. And in giving due weight to the sheer complexity of the growth process by looking in detail at the experience of four very different Chinese regions, it avoids over-simplistic macroeconomic generalization. Nevertheless, even this type of approach is inadequate, because it fails to explain why industrial policy has been so much more successful in China than in other countries. This book therefore goes beyond the 'development state' approach to argue that state autonomy in China reflected the remarkably equal distribution of income and wealth at the end of the 1970s and, paradoxically, the destruction of party structures and institutions during the Cultural Revolution. The policy implications are stark. The Chinese experience demonstrates that industrial policy and state spending on physical and social infrastructure can produce rich rewards; conversely, slavish reliance on foreign direct investment and trade are likely to limit the pace of growth. But attempts to replicate China's success in Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia will fail because their governments will not resist rent-seeking by classes and interest groups. Moreover, as the state becomes weaker in the wake of the re-emergence of a powerful capitalist class, even Chinese growth may prove unsustainable.
Categories: Business & Economics

Sources of Chinese Economic Growth 1978 1996

Sources of Chinese Economic Growth  1978 1996

From 1976 to 1997, Chinese economic growth was very fast. Chris Bramall argues that this can only be partly explained by the conventional argument for trade, foreign direct investment, and the mobilisation of surplus labour.

Author: Chris Bramall

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:475412955

Category:

Page: 568

View: 843

Categories:

Chinese Economic Development

Chinese Economic Development

Brookings Papers on Economic Activities, 2: 113–206. Bosworth, B. P. and Collins, S. M. (2007). Accounting for Growth: Comparing China and India. At http://www.brookings.edu (accessed ... Sources of Chinese Economic Growth, 19781996.

Author: Chris Bramall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134190515

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 640

View: 907

This book outlines and analyzes the economic development of China between 1949 and 2007. Rather than being narrowly economic, the book addresses many of the broader aspects of development, including literacy, morality, demographics and the environment. The distinctive features of this book are its sweep and that it does not shy away from controversial issues. For example, there is no question that aspects of Maoism were disastrous but Bramall argues that there was another side to the whole programme. More recently, the current system of government has presided over three decades of very rapid economic growth. However, the author shows that this growth has come at a price. Bramall makes it clear that unless radical change takes place, Chinese growth will not be sustainable. This large, comprehensive text is relevant to all those studying the economic history of China as well as its contemporary economy. It is also useful more generally for students and researchers in the fields of international and development economics.
Categories: Business & Economics

Productivity Efficiency and Economic Growth in China

Productivity  Efficiency and Economic Growth in China

Bosworth, B. and S. M. Collins (2003) 'The Empirics of Growth: an Update', unpublished, Brookings Institution, Washington, DC. Bramall, C. (2000) Sources of Chinese Economic Growth, 19781996 (Oxford and New York: Oxford University ...

Author: Y. Wu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230228252

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 169

View: 729

This book provides a detailed insight into productivity, efficiency and growth in the Chinese economy, and offers results on capital stock and ICT capital estimates (at both national and regional levels) which will be an important resource for readers.
Categories: Business & Economics

From Commune to Capitalism

From Commune to Capitalism

Justin Yifu Lin, “Rural Reforms and Agricultural Growth in China,” American Economic Review 82, no. 1 (1992): 34–51. ... Bramall, Sources of Chinese Economic Growth, 329. ... 1996 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), 330. 5.

Author: Zhun Xu

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781583676981

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 179

In the early 1980s, China undertook a massive reform that dismantled its socialist rural collectives and divided the land among millions of small peasant families. Known as the decollectivization campaign, it is one of the most significant reforms in China's transition to a market economy. From the beginning, the official Chinese accounts, and many academic writings, uncritically portray this campaign as a huge success, both for the peasants and the economy as a whole. This mainstream history argues that the rural communes, suffering from inefficiency, greatly improved agricultural productivity under the decollectivization reform. It also describes how the peasants, due to their dissatisfaction with the rural regime, spontaneously organized and collectively dismantled the collective system. A closer examination suggests a much different and more nuanced story. By combining historical archives, field work, and critical statistical examinations, From Commune to Capitalism argues that the decollectivization campaign was neither a bottom-up, spontaneous peasant movement, nor necessarily efficiency-improving. On the contrary, the reform was mainly a top-down, coercive campaign, and most of the efficiency gains came from simply increasing the usage of inputs, such as land and labor, rather than institutional changes. The book also asks an important question: Why did most of the peasants peacefully accept this reform? Zhun Xu answers that the problems of the communes contributed to the passiveness of the peasantry; that decollectivization, by depoliticizing the peasantry and freeing massive rural labor to compete with the urban workers, served as both the political and economic basis for consequent Chinese neoliberal reforms and a massive increase in all forms of economic, political, and social inequality. Decollectivization was, indeed, a huge success, although far from the sort suggested by mainstream accounts.
Categories: Political Science

Thoughts on Economic Development in China

Thoughts on Economic Development in China

Bramall, C. (2000) Sources of Chinese Economic Growth 19781996, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Campbell, D. and Klaes, M. (2005) 'The principle of institutional direction: Coase's regulatory critique of intervention', ...

Author: Ma Ying

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135075903

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 353

View: 742

This book is about mutual influences of thinking about economic development in China and in the West, from the 18th century until the present. Its chapters are contributed by development economists and historians of thought from China and other parts of the world. The book describes important stages in the evolution, cross-fertilization and contextual modification of ideas about economic order, development and institutional change. It illustrates how Western concepts and theories have been adopted and adapted to Chinese conditions in different waves of modernization from the late 19th century until the present and that this was and is no one-way traffic. The book examines to what extent pre-classical thinking in the West, in particular French Physiocracy in mid-18th century, was influenced by China as an ideal and a source of ideas, at a time when China was the largest and most advanced economy in the world. It discusses to what extent different approaches of modern Western-style economics, in particular in the fields of development economics and institutional economics, can be used to understand the rapid transitions and developments of the Chinese economy in recent decades, and to what extent they need to be modified in the light of new experiences and insights. Against this background, several contributions to the volume provide assessments of the current state of economic science and teaching in China, in particular with regard to Chinese views on Western economics. The book should be of interest to those who are interested in the economic history of China.
Categories: Business & Economics

China s Surging Economy

China s Surging Economy

rapidly and will gradually overtake exports and investment to become the main driver of economic growth in the coming ... Bramall, C. (2000), Sources of Chinese Economic Growth, 1978-1996, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.

Author: Wei Liu

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789812771407

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 380

View: 223

The Chinese economy today is at a critical crossroads. Sustained rapid growth has given rise to structural strains as well as sectoral imbalances. It has also generated socio-economic problems such as rising income inequality, rural discontent and environmental degradation. All of these must be addressed before China can enter the next lap of high growth. Containing 12 chapters, this volume is a collaborative effort of leading economists from Beijing, Singapore and elsewhere in the region in analyzing ChinaOCOs economic growth prospects and their concomitant problems and constraints."
Categories: Business & Economics

Inequality and Growth in Modern China

Inequality and Growth in Modern China

An Introduction to Geographical Economics , Cambridge University Press : Cambridge . Bramall , C. ( 2000 ) . Sources of Chinese Economic Growth , 19781996 . Oxford University Press . Donnithorne , A. ( 1972 ) .

Author: Guanghua Wan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199535194

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 211

View: 373

This volume provides comprehensive, up to date coverage of inequality and poverty issues in China. Going beyond standard data sources and using state-of-art research techniques, this volume substantiates a number of findings and conclusions and ensures policy recommendations are reliable and robust.
Categories: Business & Economics

China Into the Hu Wen Era

China Into the Hu Wen Era

In particular, this chapter aims to examine the new patterns of China's growth at present and in the near future. ... Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press; Bramall, C. (2000), Sources of Chinese Economic Growth, 19781996, ...

Author: John Wong

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9789812773944

Category: Political Science

Page: 565

View: 616

This volume is an updated survey and assessment of the recent policy initiatives of Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao, which have come to be known as the Hu-Wen's New Deal. Individual chapters are written by scholars from different academic disciplines and backgrounds. These scholars hail from Singapore, the United States, Australia, Korea, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Mainland China. Topics cover the patterns and process of leadership succession, emerging political factions, social unrest, sources of economic growth, income disparities, social security reform, land use policy, banking reform, corporate governance, labor and population policies, rule of law, and changes in the Party and ideology. On the external aspects, discussion includes China's changing relations with the U.S., Japan and ASEAN. In many ways, the Hu-Wen leadership today is still coming to grips with the same issues and problems as discussed in this book. Sample Chapter(s). Chapter 1: The Hu-Wen New Deal (1,271 KB). Contents: Introduction: The Hu-Wen New Deal (J Wong & H Lai); Strengthening Governance and Rule of Law: Hu Jintao's Consolidation of Power and His Command of the Gun (J You); Deciphering Hu's Leadership and Defining New Elite Politics (C Li); Hu Jintao's Approach to Governance (J Fewsmith); Re-Making the Party's Image: Challenges for the Propaganda Department (Y Zheng & L F Lye); Reforming the Party and the State Under Hu Jintao (S-C Hsu); Rule of Law and Governance (K Zou); Sustaining Economic Growth and Reform: New Patterns of Economic Growth (Y Wu); Changes and Reform in Financial Markets (H Davies); Strengthening Corporate Governance: Completing the Unfinished Business of SOE Reform (S Y Tong); The Effects and Implications of Foreign Direct Investment in China for Other Developing Economies: Hollowing Out or Filling in? (B Chantasasawat et al.); Changing Land Policies: Ideology and Realities (J Wong & R Liang); Coping with Social Issues and Tensions: Income Inequalities, Limited Social Mobility and Remedial Policies (H Lai); Labor Market Reforms Under Hu-Wen Administration (L Zhao); Managing Social Unrest (Y Cai); From Social Insurance to Social Assistance: Welfare Policy Change (E X Gu); Governments, Markets, and the Health Care Sector (a Blomqvist); Population Development Strategies: The New Thinking (X Peng); Managing China's External Relations: Bush's Asia Policy and US-China Relations (Q Zhao); China and Northeast Asian Cooperation: Building an Unbuildable? (J H Chung); China and Southeast Asia Cooperation: New Developments and Challenges (H Zhang). Readership: University and academic libraries, experts in politics, diplomacy, economics, law and sociology analysts, officials, journalists and segments of public interested in China."
Categories: Political Science