Presidential Speechwriting

Presidential Speechwriting

deciding to make the Office of Speechwriting a subdivision of Communications that reports to the director of the office rather than to the chief of staff or directly to the president , speechwriters have often been cut out of the policy ...

Author: Kurt Ritter

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1585443921

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 113

The rise of the media presidency through radio and television broadcasts has heightened the visibility and importance of presidential speeches in determining the effectiveness and popularity of the President of the United States. Not surprisingly, this development has also witnessed the rise of professional speechwriters to craft the words the chief executive would address to the nation. Yet, as this volume of expert analyses graphically demonstrates, the reliance of individual presidents on their speechwriters has varied with the rhetorical skill of the officeholder himself, his managerial style, and his personal attitude toward public speaking. The individual chapters here (two by former White House speechwriters) give fascinating insight into the process and development of presidential speechwriting from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration to Ronald Reagan’s. Some contributors, such as Charles Griffin writing on Eisenhower and Moya Ball on Johnson, offer case studies of specific speeches to gain insight into those presidents. Other chapters focus on institutional arrangements and personal relationships, rhetorical themes characterizing an administration, or the relationship between words and policies to shed light on presidential speechwriting. The range of presidents covered affords opportunities to examine various factors that make rhetoric successful or not, to study alternative organizational arrangements for speechwriters, and even to consider the evolution of the rhetorical presidency itself. Yet, the volume’s single focus on speechwriting and the analytic overviews provided by Martin J. Medhurst not only bring coherence to the work, but also make this book an exemplar of how unity can be achieved from a diversity of approaches. Medhurst’s introduction of ten “myths” in the scholarship on presidential speeches and his summary of the enduring issues in the practice of speechwriting pull together the work of individual contributors. At the same time, his introduction and conclusion transcend particular presidents by providing generalizations on the role of speechwriting in the modern White House.
Categories: Political Science

Speechwriting in Perspective

Speechwriting in Perspective

Grammar and Syntax Correct grammar and syntax in the context of speechwriting and delivery mean using a level of English usage that is appropriate to the ...

Author: Thomas H. Neale

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN: 1590336062

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 41

View: 501

Writing for the spoken word is a special discipline; it requires that speechwriters' products be written primarily, although not exclusively, to be heard, not read. Speeches are better cast in simple, direct and often short sentences that can be easily understood by listeners. Rhetorical devices such as repetition, variation, cadence and balance are available to, and should be used by, the speechwriter. It is important for speechwriters to analyse audiences according to factors such as age; gender; culture; profession and income level; size of audience; political affiliation, if any; and on the occasion for, or purpose of, the speech. Most effective speeches do not exceed 20 minutes in length. After researching a topic, speechwriters must prepare an outline from which the speech will be developed. They should strive to maintain a clear theme throughout the speech. Most speeches will have a three-part structure consisting of an introduction, a body and a conclusion. The accepted style of contemporary American public address is natural, direct, low key, casual and conversational. This puts the listeners at ease and promotes a sense of community between the audience and speaker. Punctuation should reflect the sound structure of the speech, reinforcing the rhythm and pace of actual speech. Clarity of expression is as important a consideration in speech grammar as rigid adherence to the rules for written law. This book presents the essentials of speechwriting. Preface; Speechwriting in Perspective: A Brief Guide to Effective and Persuasive Communication (Thomas H. Neale); Public Speaking and Speechwriting: Selected References (Jean M. Bowers); Index.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

Speechwriting in Perspective

Speechwriting in Perspective

Author: Thomas A. Neale

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 9781437938425

Category:

Page: 22

View: 984

This report has been compiled for congressional speechwriters but will be informative for anyone writing a speech. Contents: (1) Intro.; (2) Writing for the Spoken Word: The Distinctive Task of the Speechwriter; Repetition and Variation; Cadence and Balance; Sentence Variation; Imagery; (3) Audience Analysis; Demographics; Audience Size; Degree of Political Affiliation; (4) Occasion and Purpose; Persuasion; Entertainment; (5) Time of Day and Length of Speech; (6) Speech Research: (7) Resources; (8) Speech Preparation: Building Blocks: Suggested Principles; Speech Outline; Thematic Clarity; Structure; Style; Punctuation; Grammar and Syntax; (9) Speech Presentation; (10) Analysis of Lincoln¿s Farewell to His Neighbors; (11) General Observations.
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Speechwriting in Theory and Practice

Speechwriting in Theory and Practice

IN THE Most of the research in the field is on speechwriting in the US White House. Robert Schlesinger's White House Ghosts covers the period from Franklin D. Roosevelt to George W. Bush and is based on archival work and interviews with ...

Author: Jens E. Kjeldsen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030036850

Category: Political Science

Page: 202

View: 905

This book provides students, researchers, and practitioners of speechwriting with a unique insight in the theory, history, and practice of speechwriting. The combination of theory and practice with case studies from the United States and Europe makes this volume the first of its kind. The book offers an overview of the existing research and theory, analysing how speeches are written in political and public life, and paying attention to three central subjects of contemporary speechwriting: convincing characterization of the speaker, writing for the ear, and appealing with words to the eye. Chapters address the ethics and the functions of speechwriting in contemporary society and also deliver general instructions for the speechwriting process. This book is recommended reading for professional speechwriters wishing to expand their knowledge of the rhetorical and theoretical underpinnings of speechwriting, and enables students and aspiring speechwriters to gain an understanding of speechwriting as a profession.
Categories: Political Science

Speechwriting Lessons from the Masters

Speechwriting Lessons from the Masters

Lord Rosebery Speechwriting considers the four ( 4 ) integral elements that interplay in a public speaking situation : speaker , speech , audience and occasion . These elements have evolved from the rhetorical theories or practices of ...

Author:

Publisher: Rex Bookstore, Inc.

ISBN: 9712317889

Category:

Page:

View: 801

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Speechwriting in the Institutionalized Presidency

Speechwriting in the Institutionalized Presidency

Valenti quickly found a place helping the President with a host of speech writing and political chores. ... ghostwriting was seldom found on resumes and that the specialized speechwriting had not yet appeared on the organization chart.

Author: Kenneth Collier

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9781498553728

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 163

This book explores the development of presidential speechwriting from the administration of Franklin Roosevelt to the present. It argues that the institutionalization of speechwriting that has been blamed for bland presidential rhetoric has actually served the president well by helping presidents avoid the adverse effect of poorly chosen words.
Categories: Political Science

Speechwriting

Speechwriting

Preview of Body In the first part , I'm going to talk about the theoretical barriers to successful speech writing and to the successful management , if you will , of the speaker . Barriers that are rather intellectual than practical .

Author: Edward H. McCarthy

Publisher: Executive Speaker

ISBN: PSU:000017656689

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 121

View: 540

Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Elements of Speechwriting and Public Speaking

The Elements of Speechwriting and Public Speaking

Jerry Tarver , Professional Speech Writing . Richmond , Virginia : The Effective Speechwriting Institute , 1982 . 26. Lee A. Iacocca , “ In Order To . ” Vital Speeches of the Day , October 1 , 1987 . 27. Alan C. Nelson , " The Sanctuary ...

Author: Jeff Scott Cook

Publisher: Macmillan Publishing Company

ISBN: UOM:39015016935317

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 242

View: 410

Tells how to assess an audience, select a topic, compose a speech, develop the skill of persuasion, handle nervousness, work with AV equipment and make use of body language, as well as analyzing sample speeches
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

The Anti Intellectual Presidency

The Anti Intellectual Presidency

Specialization did not necessarily make the speechwriting office more efficient. The speechwriting office was in relative disarray during the Ford and first Bush administrations.17 Rather, it institutionalized the reification of style ...

Author: Elvin T. Lim

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199711615

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 279

Why has it been so long since an American president has effectively and consistently presented well-crafted, intellectually substantive arguments to the American public? Why have presidential utterances fallen from the rousing speeches of Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Wilson, and FDR to a series of robotic repetitions of talking points and sixty-second soundbites, largely designed to obfuscate rather than illuminate? In The Anti-Intellectual Presidency, Elvin Lim draws on interviews with more than 40 presidential speechwriters to investigate this relentless qualitative decline, over the course of 200 years, in our presidents' ability to communicate with the public. Lim argues that the ever-increasing pressure for presidents to manage public opinion and perception has created a "pathology of vacuous rhetoric and imagery" where gesture and appearance matter more than accomplishment and fact. Lim tracks the campaign to simplify presidential discourse through presidential and speechwriting decisions made from the Truman to the present administration, explaining how and why presidents have embraced anti-intellectualism and vague platitudes as a public relations strategy. Lim sees this anti-intellectual stance as a deliberate choice rather than a reflection of presidents' intellectual limitations. Only the smart, he suggests, know how to dumb down. The result, he shows, is a dangerous debasement of our political discourse and a quality of rhetoric which has been described, charitably, as "a linguistic struggle" and, perhaps more accurately, as "dogs barking idiotically through endless nights." Sharply written and incisively argued, The Anti-Intellectual Presidency sheds new light on the murky depths of presidential oratory, illuminating both the causes and consequences of this substantive impoverishment.
Categories: Political Science

Communication and Language Analysis in the Public Sphere

Communication and Language Analysis in the Public Sphere

Some important scholarship on presidential speechwriting has come from several recent books. Martin Medhurst, notes in the introduction of his edited volume Presidential Speechwriting (2003), “Unfortunately, there is more than a little ...

Author: Hart, Roderick P.

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN: 9781466650046

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 580

View: 660

Although, language is certainly individualized, most people conform to linguistic norms because of their surroundings. Over time, particular words and phrases are popularized by the media, social trends, or world events; and with emergence of internet technologies, the communication between all types of people is much easier. Communication and Language Analysis in the Public Sphere explores the influence of the World Wide Web on the relationships between ordinary citizens and the ability to communicate with politicians, celebrities, and the media. As some words may gain popularity worldwide, and others may begin to define a specific discipline. This book is essential for linguistics researchers, scholars, and professionals interested in determining these patterns and how they affect groups and individuals.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines