How to Watch Television Second Edition

How to Watch Television  Second Edition

TV is complicated. This can mean many different things. Sometimes the text itself is formulaic, yet its pleasures are complicated. Other times, the narrative of a TV program doesn't present a clear plot, yet attempting to puzzle out the ...

Author: Ethan Thompson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9781479898817

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 432

View: 435

A new edition that brings the ways we watch and think about television up to the present We all have opinions about the television shows we watch, but television criticism is about much more than simply evaluating the merits of a particular show and deeming it “good” or “bad.” Rather, criticism uses the close examination of a television program to explore that program’s cultural significance, creative strategies, and its place in a broader social context. How to Watch Television, Second Edition brings together forty original essays—more than half of which are new to this edition—from today’s leading scholars on television culture, who write about the programs they care (and think) the most about. Each essay focuses on a single television show, demonstrating one way to read the program and, through it, our media culture. From fashioning blackness in Empire to representation in Orange is the New Black and from the role of the reboot in Gilmore Girls to the function of changing political atmospheres in Roseanne, these essays model how to practice media criticism in accessible language, providing critical insights through analysis—suggesting a way of looking at TV that students and interested viewers might emulate. The contributors discuss a wide range of television programs past and present, covering many formats and genres, spanning fiction and non-fiction, broadcast, streaming, and cable. Addressing shows from TV’s earliest days to contemporary online transformations of the medium, How to Watch Television, Second Edition is designed to engender classroom discussion among television critics of all backgrounds.
Categories: Performing Arts

The Impact of Watching Violent Television Programs on Secondary School Children in Tanzania

The Impact of Watching Violent Television Programs on Secondary School Children in Tanzania

WATCHING TELEVISION IS ENJOYABLE and refreshing. It has been a customary exercise for youth and adults to watch television at homes and in public places. Some of the reasons that make television watching important are the following: ...

Author: Watson Lupogo Masiba

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781498286282

Category: Social Science

Page: 136

View: 475

Violent television programs are highly preferred by children. They stimulate their emotions and increase curiosity about violence-related issues. This means that watching violent television programs has an impact upon their way of perceiving the world around them and acting in response to it. This study investigated the impacts of watching violent television programs on secondary school children in Tanzania. The specific objectives were: to examine children's accessibility to the TV, ascertain the types of violent TV programs and the time children spend watching them, determine the ways in which watching violent TV programs affects their academic performance, find out the impact of watching violent TV programs on their discipline, and examine the role of parents in addressing the impacts of watching violent TV programs upon their children. Results indicate that most secondary school children watch violent TV programs at home in the sitting rooms. They spend an average of three hours per day on weekdays, and seven-and-half hours on weekends, watching movies, music, drama, and informational programs that were identified as the most violent ones. Obviously, spending lots of time watching violent TV programs decreases children's academic performance and discipline. This book is important because it discusses the parents' role in discouraging and limiting children from watching violent TV programs, and choosing appropriate TV programs for them.
Categories: Social Science

Watching TV with a Linguist

Watching TV with a Linguist

The free, grammatical morpheme a is incorrectly used in conjunction with the word people, which is the noun person inflected for plural. Argue that Homer's pairing of a and people is encouraged because of the irregularity of the plural ...

Author: Kristy Beers Fägersten

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815653950

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page:

View: 710

In Watching TV with a Linguist, Fägersten challenges the conventional view of television as lowbrow entertainment devoid of intellectual activity. Rather, she champions the use of fictional television to learn about linguistics and at the same time promotes enriched television viewing experiences by explaining the role of language in creating humor, conveying drama, and developing identifiable characters. The essays gathered in this volume explore specific areas of linguistics, providing a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to the study of language. Through programs such as Seinfeld, The Simpsons, Sherlock, and The Wire, contributors deftly illustrate key linguistic concepts and terminology using snippets of familiar dialogue and examples of subtle narration. In addition, contributors aim to raise linguistic awareness among readers by identifying linguistics in action, encouraging readers to recognize additional examples of concepts on their own. To this end, each chapter provides suggestions for viewing other television series or specific episodes, where further examples of the linguistic concepts in focus can be found. Invaluable as a resource in linguistics and communication courses, Watching TV with a Linguist is the first book to use the familiar and compelling medium of television to engage students with the science of language.
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines

DRIVING IS JUST LIKE WATCHING TELEVISION

DRIVING IS JUST LIKE WATCHING TELEVISION

Drivers' Education and good driving instructions are the foundations for surfing the channels The instructors teach how to safely negotiate the channels on which to drive Instructors teach how fast to watch the screen at the speeds the ...

Author: Fred H. Alexander Jr.

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 9781491833285

Category: Transportation

Page: 36

View: 195

The author states and believes he is the best driver he knows. This book simply tells and illustrates how he drives. With this book you can become a driver almost as good as the author, a driver who drives safely and enjoys driving. This book is a driving attitude changer.
Categories: Transportation

How To Watch Television

How To Watch Television

To understand TV, you need to watch TV. This might seem obvious, but there is a tradition of critics writing about television (usually to condemn it) without actually taking the time to watch much of it, or even to specify what TV texts ...

Author: Jason Mittell

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814763988

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 396

View: 576

We all have opinions about the television shows we watch, but television criticism is about much more than simply evaluating the merits of a particular show and deeming it ‘good’ or ‘bad.’ Rather, criticism uses the close examination of a television program to explore that program’s cultural significance, creative strategies, and its place in a broader social context. How to Watch Television brings together forty original essays from today’s leading scholars on television culture, writing about the programs they care (and think) the most about. Each essay focuses on a particular television show, demonstrating one way to read the program and, through it, our media culture. The essays model how to practice media criticism in accessible language, providing critical insights through analysis—suggesting a way of looking at TV that students and interested viewers might emulate. The contributors discuss a wide range of television programs past and present, covering many formats and genres, spanning fiction and non-fiction, broadcast and cable, providing a broad representation of the programs that are likely to be covered in a media studies course. While the book primarily focuses on American television, important programs with international origins and transnational circulation are also covered. Addressing television series from the medium’s earliest days to contemporary online transformations of television, How to Watch Television is designed to engender classroom discussion among television critics of all backgrounds. Read: Introduction / Table of Contents / Sample Essays Online View: Clips from the Essays Visit the Facebook page.
Categories: Performing Arts

Watching Television Come of Age

Watching Television Come of Age

But it does mean that there is the common bond of an independent opinion independently reached. The set owner in deciding whether he likes a show or not invokes only his own standards and doesn't give a hoot about mass tastes, ...

Author: Louis L. Gould

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292758766

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 267

View: 682

Providing video companionship for isolated housewives, afternoon babysitting for children, and nonstop evening entertainment for the whole family, television revolutionized American society in the post–World War II years. Helping the first TV generation make sense of the new medium was the mission of Jack Gould, television critic of The New York Times from 1947 to 1972. In columns noteworthy for crisp writing, pointed insights, and fair judgment, he highlighted both the untapped possibilities and the imminent perils of television, becoming "the conscience of the industry" for many people. In this book, historian Lewis L. Gould, Jack Gould’s son, collects over seventy of his father’s best columns. Grouped topically, they cover a wide range of issues, including the Golden Age of television drama, McCarthy-era blacklisting, the rise and fall of Edward R. Murrow, quiz show scandals, children’s programming, and the impact of television on American life and of television criticism on the medium itself. Lewis Gould also supplies a brief biography of his father that assesses his influence on the evolution of television, as well as prefaces to each section.
Categories: Performing Arts

Watching Shakespeare on Television

Watching Shakespeare on Television

This is largely a lexographical quibble for the culturally insecure . Interesting ? ... I tell them I've been sitting in this room for more than two months , watching TV into the early hours , listening carefully , taking notes .

Author: Herbert R. Coursen

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 0838635210

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 198

View: 627

Watching Shakespeare on Television looks at Shakespeare as a cultural phenomenon and at the videocassette as "text" - that is, as an object fixed in time as well as in its assumptions about its medium. Even films made to be shown at a cinema are also designed to become cassettes for the vast "secondary" market. H. R. Coursen's study of Shakespearean films and television productions includes such classics as Olivier's Hamlet and Brook's and Welles's King Lear, as well as more recent productions such as Kevin Kline's and Mel Gibson's Hamlets, Kenneth Branagh's Henvy V, and Peter Greenaway's version of The Tempest, Prospero's Books. Shakespeare's scripts are designed to be "open to interpretation." That openness is not the invention of disciples of Foucault or Derrida. The "meaning" of a Shakespeare script can never be fixed; rather, it is a temporal quality that shows how a script reflects, reinterprets, or reemphasizes the cultural and ideological assumptions of a particular moment in history. Shakespeare remains popular, as Branagh's Henry V, Zeffirelli's Hamlet, and a proliferation of Shakespeare's festivals prove. The energy known as Shakespeare cannot be isolated from the culture that constantly reappropriates the scripts and creates new audiences for them. Shakespeare "works" on television because television is a linguistic medium, and because we are becoming accustomed to the diminished scale of the television (and the videocassette), as opposed to the grander dimensions of cinema. Shakespeare survives domestication, but in ways that demand investigation about why and how the scripts can work on television, and about the nature of this medium when it is charged with Shakespearean energy. Watching Shakespeare on Television looks at Gertrude, a character often clear in performance even if "unwritten" in the script, and at Hamlet's disquisition to Yorick's skull, subject to a wide range of options and interpretations. Other subjects covered are "style" in A Midsummer Night's Dream, particularly the 1982 ART production; the advantages film has over studio productions; and editing scripts for television, with a focus on the Nunn Othello and the Kline Hamlet. In the latter production, long takes contrast with the quicksilver montage technique of Zeffirelli's film version. Another chapter examines Othello as a script demanding a black actor in the lead, and it looks at the Nunn and Suzman versions as cases in point. Closure in Hamlet is analyzed as well: television, the modern medium of political closure, tends to include Fortinbras, as opposed to film which usually excludes him. Another chapter evaluates Prospero's Books, where the importation of television to film tends to erase film's field of depth and results in no improvement, regardless of the trumpeted "technological breakthrough" of high-definition television. Finally, the book peers into the future of Shakespeare's moving image, with attention paid to Peter Donaldson's Interactive Archive at M.I.T.
Categories: Performing Arts

Watching TV Religiously Engaging Culture

Watching TV Religiously  Engaging Culture

before we can understand the power and meaning of a single episode or series. It is rather to highlight the fact that TV does not exist in a vacuum, and part of analyzing the structure of television is to raise questions concerning the ...

Author: Kutter Callaway

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN: 9781493405855

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 945

Helping Christians Understand the Power and Meaning of TV Since its inception, television has captured the cultural imagination. Outside of work and sleep, it is now the primary preoccupation of most Americans. Individuals consume upward of five hours of TV daily, even more when taking into account viewing done online and on mobile devices. TV is so ingrained in the fabric of everyday life that it can't help but function as one of the primary means through which we make sense of our lives and the world. This book shows that television--as a technology, a narrative art form, a commodity, and a portal for our ritual lives--confronts viewers theologically. Whether its content is explicitly spiritual or not, TV routinely invites (and sometimes demands) theological reflection. This book articulates something of the presence and activity of God in the golden age of TV and forges an appropriate response to an ever-changing cultural form. It constructs a theology of television that allows for both celebration and critique, helping Christians more fully understand and appreciate the power and meaning of TV. A supplemental website provides additional resources, conversations, and close readings of TV programs.
Categories: Religion

Television at the Movies

Television at the Movies

When Chauncey says, “I like to watch,” he is referring to watching television, but is interpreted to mean watching in a voyeuristic sense, implying something obscene or pornographic about television. But why should the vidiot wield ...

Author: Jon Nelson Wagner

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9781441179401

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 607

The overview of television criticism, which this book provides, comes appropriately at a moment of change. Television is becoming dramatically different as a result of new and developing technologies such as cable, HDTV, satellite transmission and broadband distributions. By concentrating on the still-dominant notion of television, what the authors call "Classical Network Television," they argue that it is as important to understand this model as it is to understand Classical Hollywood Cinema. The co-authors have a unique approach to the study of television, viewing its history and reception not only through important articles about the medium, but also through analyzing how Hollywood auteur cinema has commented on television over the decades, in films such as Tootsie, Network, The Last Picture Show, A Face in the Crowd, Rollerball, The King of Comedy and others. Not only does this reflect the pervasive use of cinema theory to discuss television, it also helps to emphasize the importance of clarifying the distinctions between the criticisms of the two media. Television at the Movies argues that the study of television is a crucial aspect of understanding our recent and contemporary culture, and it provides an illuminating point of entry for students and researchers in the field.
Categories: Performing Arts

Watching Arabic Television in Europe

Watching Arabic Television in Europe

Language itself is a medium. Arabic is not just a language that preserves connections with a past; it is also the language of the Koran. Language carries emotional power. A French participantcouldnot livewithoutArabic television.

Author: Christina Slade

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137352439

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 212

What are Arabic Europeans watching on television and how does it affect their identities as Europeans? New evidence from seven capitals shows that, far from being isolated in ethnic media ghettoes, they are critical news consumers in Arabic and European languages and engaged citizens.
Categories: Social Science