Tennessee s Historic Landscapes

Tennessee s Historic Landscapes

Acknowledgments Many librarians , curators , historic site managers , architectural historians , and county historians from throughout Tennessee have given me invaluable help and encouragement during my research of the Tennessee ...

Author: Carroll Van West

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 0870498819

Category: History

Page: 503

View: 145

Categories: History

Historic Landscape Directory

Historic Landscape Directory

Williamson County Planning Commission 1320 West Main Street Franklin , TN 37064 ( 615 ) 790-5725 The Tennessee chapter of the ASLA is beginning a survey of historic landscapes throughout the state , working in conjunction with State ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCR:31210024860395

Category: Historic gardens

Page: 96

View: 321

Categories: Historic gardens

Tennessee s New Deal Landscape

Tennessee s New Deal Landscape

A partial state context is provided through the author's Tennessee's Historic Landscapes : A Traveler's Guide ( Knoxville : Univ . of Tennessee Press , 1995 ) . How other authors studied state parks also informed my research .

Author: Carroll Van West

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 1572331089

Category: Architecture

Page: 281

View: 623

The indelible stamp of the New Deal can be seen across American in the public works projects that modernized the country even as they provided employment during the Great Depression. Tennessee, in particular, benefited from the surge in federal construction. The New Deal not only left the state with many public buildings and schools that are still in active use, but is conservation and reclamation efforts also changed the lives of Tennesseans for generations to come. In Tennessee's New Deal Landscape, Caroll Van West examines over 250 historic sites created from 1933 to 1942: courthouses, post offices, community buildings, schools, and museums, along with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Cherokee National Forest, and the dams and reservoirs of the Tennessee Valley Authority. He describes the significant and impact of each project and provides maps to guide readers to the sites described. West discusses architectural styles that are often difficult to identity, and his lively narrative points out some of the paradoxes of New Deal projects-such as the proliferation of leisure parks during the nation's darkest hours. In highlighting these projects, he shows that Tennessee owes much not only to TVA but also to many other agencies and individuals who left their mark on the landscape through roads, levees, and reforested hillsides as well as buildings. An invaluable resource for travelers as well as scholars, this book reveals a legacy of historic treasures that are well worth preserving. The Author: Carroll Van West is projects manager for the Center of Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University. The author of Tennessee's Historic Landscapes, he most recently edited the volumes Tennessee History: The Land, the People, and the Culture and the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. He is also senior editor of the Tennessee Historic Quarterly.
Categories: Architecture

Tennessee Log Buildings

Tennessee Log Buildings

... 49, 55 Sycamore Shoals settlement (Tennessee), 32 Tennessee: forest ecology, 54–55; maps, xiv, 28; settlement history, 25–37, ... 43; timber types, 54 Tennessee's Historic Landscapes: A Traveler's Guide (West), 33 Tidewater region.

Author: John B. Rehder

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572339316

Category: Architecture

Page: 192

View: 885

Drawing on more than four decades of research, Tennessee Log Buildings examines one of the Volunteer State’s most precious—and fast-disappearing—traditions. From the pioneer era through the mid–twentieth century, folk builders in Tennessee used logs to construct cabins, barns, other outbuildings, schools, and churches. In warm, accessible prose that often makes this deeply researched work read like guidebook, John Rehder explores the varied styles and architectural characteristics of these fascinating structures, including their floor plans, the types of timber used, and the different notches that were cut into the logs to secure the structures. Profusely illustrated with over one hundred images, Tennessee Log Houses traces the evolution of log houses from one-room (or single-pen) dwellings to more elaborate homes of various types, such as saddlebags, Cumberland houses, dogtrots, and two-story I-houses. Rehder discusses the historic settlement patterns and building traditions that led to this variety of house types and identifies their particular occurrences throughout the state by drawing on surveys conducted in forty-two counties by teams working for the Tennessee Historical Commission (THC). Similarly, he explores disparate barn and outbuilding types, including the distinctive cantilever barns that are found predominantly in East Tennessee. Sprinkled throughout the book are engaging anecdotes that convey just what it is like to conduct field research in remote rural areas. Rehder also describes in detail a number of the state’s exceptional log places, among them Wynnewood, an enormous structure in Middle Tennessee which dates back to the early nineteenth century and which suffered severe tornado damage in 2008. As the author notes, many of the buildings originally identified in the THC investigations have now vanished completely while others are in serious disrepair. Thus, this book not only offers an instructive and delightful look at a key part of Tennessee’s heritage but also makes an eloquent plea for its preservation. Until his death in 2011, JOHN B. REHDER was a professor of geography at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He first joined the UT faculty in 1967. He was the author of Appalachian Folkways, which won the Pioneer America Society’s Fred B. Kniffen Book Award in 2004, and Delta Sugar: Louisiana’s Vanishing Plantation Landscape, which won the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s 2000 Abbott Lowell Cummings Award.
Categories: Architecture

Tennessee State Parks

Tennessee State Parks

Among these valuable sources are Carroll Van West's The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, Tennessee's Historic Landscapes, and Tennessee's New Deal Landscape; Bevley R. Coleman's A History of State Parks in Tennessee; ...

Author: Lori Jill Smith and Jane Banks Campbell

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467124997

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 503

The story of Tennessee's state parks began more than 80 years ago when New Deal agencies worked to rebuild portions of Tennessee's eroded landscape. Along with these conservation measures, the state's early parks were created through the development of recreational areas. The Tennessee Valley Authority built dams that contributed to recreational attractions, and the Division of State Parks was started in 1937. All of these efforts in addition to Tennessee's natural beauty have resulted in 56 state parks. Through their postcard collections, the authors invite readers to discover each park's special place in Tennessee's history and landscape.
Categories: History

The West Tennessee Historical Society Papers

The West Tennessee Historical Society Papers

24 > 25 26 > Shereen Sampson , “ Reclaiming a Historic Landscape : the Interpretation of Frances Wright's Nashoba Plantation in Germantown , Tennessee , ” ( M.A. Thesis , Middle Tennessee State University , 1998 ) : 33 .

Author: West Tennessee Historical Society

Publisher:

ISBN: UVA:X030364967

Category: Tennessee, West

Page:

View: 695

Categories: Tennessee, West

Tennessee s Dixie Highway

Tennessee s Dixie Highway

Revised electronic version available at http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net. ———. Tennessee's Historic Landscapes: A Traveler's Guide. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995. INDEX Adams Allison, Michael Morrison Belmont University ...

Author: Leslie N. Sharp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439641637

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 628

The late-19th- and early-20th-century vision of the New South relied upon economic growth and access. The development of the Dixie Highway from 1914 to 1927—with its eastern and western branches running from Ontario, Canada, south to Miami, Florida—would help facilitate this dream attracting industry, tourists, and even new residents. Images of America: Tennessee’s Dixie Highway: Springfield to Chattanooga tells the story of people, places, politics, and organizations behind the construction of the road from Springfield, Tennessee, to Chattanooga. This section is particularly important, as it was roughly the halfway point of the route and contained the headquarters of the Dixie Highway Association in Chattanooga. It also included the seemingly insurmountable Monteagle Mountain in Marion County—the very last portion of the national north-south highway to be completed.
Categories: Photography

Bristol to Knoxville

Bristol to Knoxville

The Faces of East Tennessee : An Historical Perspective on the Counties of East Tennessee . ... Federal Writers Project of the WPA for the State of Tennessee . ... Tennessee's Historic Landscapes : A Traveler's Guide .

Author: Elena Irish Zimmerman

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738568627

Category: History

Page: 123

View: 272

Bristol to Knoxville: A Postcard Tour takes us on a journey back to a simpler time, 1939, and invites us to tour the towns of East Tennessee by means of the picture postcard. The 1930s were fascinating years in America. It was a time of struggle, and yet of hope; of hardship, and yet of optimism. America fought her way through the Depression to emerge the better for it, and those who came through were determined to live the American dream. In 1939, as in previous decades, the postcard was a supremely popular means of fast and easy communication. Postcard companies sent their photographers all over America, to cities and crossroads alike. These photographers captured on film scenes that would prove popular commercially, but in doing so, they were unknowingly creating a tremendous archive of historical images that are of great value today for the insights they offer into the way life was lived in the early twentieth century.
Categories: History

Up from the Mudsills of Hell

Up from the Mudsills of Hell

Tennessee Agriculture:A Century Farms Perspective. Nashville: Tennessee Department ofAgriculture, 1986. ———. Tennessee's Historic Landscapes:A Traveler's Guide. Knoxville: Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1995. ———. Tennessee History: The Land ...

Author: Connie L. Lester

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820327624

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 544

Up from the Mudsills of Hell analyzes agrarian activism in Tennessee from the 1870s to 1915 within the context of farmers’ lives, community institutions, and familial and communal networks. Locating the origins of the agrarian movements in the state’s late antebellum and post-Civil War farm economy, Connie Lester traces the development of rural reform from the cooperative efforts of the Grange, the Agricultural Wheel, and the Farmers’ Alliance through the insurgency of the People’s Party and the emerging rural bureaucracy of the Cooperative Extension Service and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Lester ties together a rich and often contradictory history of cooperativism, prohibition, disfranchisement, labor conflicts, and third-party politics to show that Tennessee agrarianism was more complex and threatening to the established political and economic order than previously recognized. As farmers reached across gender, racial, and political boundaries to create a mass movement, they shifted the ground under the monoliths of southern life. Once the Democratic Party had destroyed the insurgency, farmers responded in both traditional and progressive ways. Some turned inward, focusing on a localism that promoted--sometimes through violence--rigid adherence to established social boundaries. Others, however, organized into the Farmers’ Union, whose membership infiltrated the Tennessee Department of Agriculture and the Cooperative Extension Service. Acting through these bureaucracies, Tennessee agrarian leaders exerted an important influence over the development of agricultural legislation for the twentieth century. Up from the Mudsills of Hell not only provides an important reassessment of agrarian reform and radicalism in Tennessee, but also links this Upper South state into the broader sweep of southern and American farm movements emerging in the late nineteenth century.
Categories: History