Textiles and Gender in Antiquity

Textiles and Gender in Antiquity

This volume looks at how the issues of textiles and gender intertwine across three millennia in antiquity and examines continuities and differences across time and space – with surprising resonances for the modern world.

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350141513

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 348

This volume looks at how the issues of textiles and gender intertwine across three millennia in antiquity and examines continuities and differences across time and space – with surprising resonances for the modern world. The interplay of gender, identity, textile production and use is notable on many levels, from the question of who was involved in the transformation of raw materials into fabric at one end, to the wearing of garments and the construction of identity at the other. Textile production has often been considered to follow a linear trajectory from a domestic (female) activity to a more 'commercial' or 'industrial' (male-centred) mode of production. In reality, many modes of production co-existed and the making of textiles is not so easily grafted onto the labour of one sex or the other. Similarly, textiles once transformed into garments are often of 'unisex' shape but worn to express the gender of the wearer. As shown by the detailed textual source material and the rich illustrations in this volume, dress and gender are intimately linked in the visual and written records of antiquity. The contributors show how it is common practice in both art and literature not only to use particular garments to characterize one sex or the other, but also to undermine characterizations by suggesting that they display features usually associated with the opposite gender.
Categories: History

Textiles and Gender in Antiquity

Textiles and Gender in Antiquity

ANTIQUITY: AN. INTRODUCTION. Mary. Harlow,. Cécile. Michel. and. Louise. Quillien. From the moment a researcher dips their pen into the field of textile studies they are confronted with the issue of gender. Gender and textiles ...

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350141506

Category: Art

Page: 328

View: 767

This volume looks at how the issues of textiles and gender intertwine across three millennia in antiquity and examines continuities and differences across time and space – with surprising resonances for the modern world. The interplay of gender, identity, textile production and use is notable on many levels, from the question of who was involved in the transformation of raw materials into fabric at one end, to the wearing of garments and the construction of identity at the other. Textile production has often been considered to follow a linear trajectory from a domestic (female) activity to a more 'commercial' or 'industrial' (male-centred) mode of production. In reality, many modes of production co-existed and the making of textiles is not so easily grafted onto the labour of one sex or the other. Similarly, textiles once transformed into garments are often of 'unisex' shape but worn to express the gender of the wearer. As shown by the detailed textual source material and the rich illustrations in this volume, dress and gender are intimately linked in the visual and written records of antiquity. The contributors show how it is common practice in both art and literature not only to use particular garments to characterize one sex or the other, but also to undermine characterizations by suggesting that they display features usually associated with the opposite gender.
Categories: Art

Textiles in Ancient Mediterranean Iconography

Textiles in Ancient Mediterranean Iconography

Textiles in Greek Sanctuaries in the 7th to the 1st Centuries BC (2016) and the anthology Textiles and Cult in the ... and Fashion: Antiquity (2017), A Cultural History of Hair: Antiquity (2019), Textiles and Gender in Antiquity: From ...

Author: Susanna Harris

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781789257229

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 154

This volume provides an ambitious synopsis of the complex, colourful world of textiles in ancient Mediterranean iconography. A wealth of information on ancient textiles is available from depictions such as sculpture, vase painting, figurines, reliefs and mosaics. Commonly represented in clothing, textiles are also present in furnishings and through the processes of textile production. The challenge for anyone analysing ancient iconography is determining how we interpret what we see. As preserved textiles rarely survive in comparable forms, we must consider the extent to which representations of textiles reflect reality, and critically evaluate the sources. Images are not simple replicas or photographs of reality. Instead, iconography draws on select elements from the surrounding world that were recognisable to the ancient audience, and reveal the perceptions, ideologies, and ideas of the society in which they were produced. Through examining the durable evidence, this anthology reveals the ephemeral world of textiles and their integral role in the daily life, cult and economy of the ancient Mediterranean.
Categories: History

A Cultural History of Hair in Antiquity

A Cultural History of Hair in Antiquity

She has published several articles on Roman dress, gender, and body language, but has also written on other aspects ... and Fashion (2017), Textiles and Gender in Antiquity (2020) and A Cultural History of Shopping (forthcoming, 2022).

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350087903

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 662

Hair, or lack of it, is one the most significant identifiers of individuals in any society. In Antiquity, the power of hair to send a series of social messages was no different. This volume covers nearly a thousand years of history, from Archaic Greece to the end of the Roman Empire, concentrating on what is now Europe, North Africa, and the Near East. Among the key issues identified by its authors is the recognition that in any given society male and female hair tend to be opposites (when male hair is generally short, women's is long); that hair is a marker of age and stage of life (children and young people have longer, less confined hairstyles; adult hair is far more controlled); hair can be used to identify the 'other' in terms of race and ethnicity but also those who stand outside social norms such as witches and mad women. The chapters in A Cultural History of Hair in Antiquity cover the following topics: religion and ritualized belief, self and society, fashion and adornment, production and practice, health and hygiene, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and social status, and cultural representations.
Categories: History

Ancient Textile Production from an Interdisciplinary Perspective

Ancient Textile Production from an Interdisciplinary Perspective

Landenius Enegren H (2020) Women, men, girls and boys: Gendered textile work at Late Bronze Age Knossos. In: Harlow M, Michel C, Quillen L (eds), Textiles and gender in Antiquity: From the Orient to the Mediterranean.

Author: Agata Ulanowska

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030921705

Category:

Page:

View: 648

Categories:

Age Ages and Ageing in the Greco Roman World

Age  Ages and Ageing in the Greco Roman World

With chapters on the upbringing of satyrs, the reverse-transformation of Eros from young man to baby, working children and young men in Roman Egypt, tales of the misbehaviour of Alexander the Great and some Late Antique students, this ...

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher:

ISBN: 1527581209

Category:

Page:

View: 516

With chapters on the upbringing of satyrs, the reverse-transformation of Eros from young man to baby, working children and young men in Roman Egypt, tales of the misbehaviour of Alexander the Great and some Late Antique students, this volume offers much to engage the interest of ancient historians, classicists and historians of age and ageing in other periods. The book also includes discussions on the careful presentation of freedmen, dressed women and men, wicked imperial stepmothers, obstreperous old Athenians, and some very old grandparents. From the mythological to the more ordinary, chapters investigate attitudes to age and ageing in the ancient world, intergenerational relationships, and the intersections with gender, class and status.
Categories:

Making Textiles in pre Roman and Roman Times

Making Textiles in pre Roman and Roman Times

Beginning in the Iron Age, the volume examines the foundations of the textile trade in Italy and the emergence of specialist textile production in Austria, the impact of new Roman markets on regional traditions and the role that gender ...

Author: Margarita Gleba

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781842177679

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 193

Textile production is an economic necessity that has confronted all societies in the past. While most textiles were manufactured at a household level, valued textiles were traded over long distances and these trade networks were influenced by raw material supply, labour skills, costs, as well as by regional traditions. This was true in the Mediterranean regions and Making Textiles in pre-Roman and Roman times explores the abundant archaeological and written evidence to understand the typological and geographical diversity of textile commodities. Beginning in the Iron Age, the volume examines the foundations of the textile trade in Italy and the emergence of specialist textile production in Austria, the impact of new Roman markets on regional traditions and the role that gender played in the production of textiles. Trade networks from far beyond the frontiers of the Empire are traced, whilst the role of specialized merchants dealing in particular types of garment and the influence of Roman collegia on how textiles were produced and distributed are explored. Of these collegia, that of the fullers appears to have been particularly influential at a local level and how cloth was cleaned and treated is examined in detail, using archaeological evidence from Pompeii and provincial contexts to understand the processes behind this area of the textile trade.
Categories: Social Science

Greek and Roman Textiles and Dress

Greek and Roman Textiles and Dress

Women's Ritual in the Ancient Mediterranean, 137–153. ... Gender and Status in the Funerary Iconography of Textile Manufacture in Roman Italy and Gaul. Larsson Lovén, L. 2007 Wool Work as A Gender Symbol in Ancient Rome.

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781782977162

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 320

View: 419

Twenty chapters present the range of current research into the study of textiles and dress in classical antiquity, stressing the need for cross and inter-disciplinarity study in order to gain the fullest picture of surviving material. Issues addressed include: the importance of studying textiles to understand economy and landscape in the past; different types of embellishments of dress from weaving techniques to the (late introduction) of embroidery; the close links between the language of ancient mathematics and weaving; the relationships of iconography to the realities of clothed bodies including a paper on the ground breaking research on the polychromy of ancient statuary; dye recipes and methods of analysis; case studies of garments in Spanish, Viennese and Greek collections which discuss methods of analysis and conservation; analyses of textile tools from across the Mediterranean; discussions of trade and ethnicity to the workshop relations in Roman fulleries. Multiple aspects of the production of textiles and the social meaning of dress are included here to offer the reader an up-to-date account of the state of current research. The volume opens up the range of questions that can now be answered when looking at fragments of textiles and examining written and iconographic images of dressed individuals in a range of media. The volume is part of a pair together with Prehistoric, Ancient Near Eastern and Aegean Textiles and Dress: an interdisciplinary anthology edited by Mary Harlow, C_cile Michel and Marie-Louise Nosch
Categories: Crafts & Hobbies

A Cultural History of Dress and Fashion in Antiquity

A Cultural History of Dress and Fashion in Antiquity

Ancient Faces (London: British Museum, 1997). see Chapter 1 in this volume on textile production; ... Larsson Lovén and Agneta strömberg (Jonsered: Paul Åströms Förlag, 1998), 85–95; EAD, “Wool work as a gender symbol in ancient Rome.

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350114036

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 840

Whilst seemingly simple garments such as the tunic remained staples of the classical wardrobe, sources from the period reveal a rich variety of changing styles and attitudes to clothing across the ancient world. Covering the period 500 BCE to 800 CE and drawing on sources ranging from extant garments and architectural iconography to official edicts and literature, this volume reveals Antiquity's preoccupation with dress, which was matched by an appreciation of the processes of production rarely seen in later periods. From a courtesan's sheer faux-silk garb to the sumptuous purple dyes of an emperor's finery, clothing was as much a marker of status and personal expression as it was a site of social control and anxiety. Contemporary commentators expressed alarm in equal measure at the over-dressed, the excessively ascetic or at 'barbarian' silhouettes. Richly illustrated with 100 images, A Cultural History of Dress and Fashion in Antiquity presents an overview of the period with essays on textiles, production and distribution, the body, belief, gender and sexuality, status, ethnicity, visual representations, and literary representations.
Categories: Art

Greek and Roman Textiles and Dress

Greek and Roman Textiles and Dress

The volume is part of a pair together with Prehistoric, Ancient Near Eastern and Aegean Textiles and Dress: an interdisciplinary anthology edited by Mary Harlow, C_cile Michel and Marie-Louise Nosch

Author: Mary Harlow

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781782977186

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 320

View: 973

Twenty chapters present the range of current research into the study of textiles and dress in classical antiquity, stressing the need for cross and inter-disciplinarity study in order to gain the fullest picture of surviving material. Issues addressed include: the importance of studying textiles to understand economy and landscape in the past; different types of embellishments of dress from weaving techniques to the (late introduction) of embroidery; the close links between the language of ancient mathematics and weaving; the relationships of iconography to the realities of clothed bodies including a paper on the ground breaking research on the polychromy of ancient statuary; dye recipes and methods of analysis; case studies of garments in Spanish, Viennese and Greek collections which discuss methods of analysis and conservation; analyses of textile tools from across the Mediterranean; discussions of trade and ethnicity to the workshop relations in Roman fulleries. Multiple aspects of the production of textiles and the social meaning of dress are included here to offer the reader an up-to-date account of the state of current research. The volume opens up the range of questions that can now be answered when looking at fragments of textiles and examining written and iconographic images of dressed individuals in a range of media. The volume is part of a pair together with Prehistoric, Ancient Near Eastern and Aegean Textiles and Dress: an interdisciplinary anthology edited by Mary Harlow, C_cile Michel and Marie-Louise Nosch
Categories: Crafts & Hobbies