The Archaeology of Colonialism

The Archaeology of Colonialism

Claire Lyons and John Papadopoulos summarize the complex issues addressed by this collection of essays. Four case studies illustrate the use of archaeological artifacts to reconstruct social structures.

Author: Claire L. Lyons

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 0892366354

Category: Architecture

Page: 284

View: 201

The Archaeology of Colonialism demonstrates how artifacts are not only the residue of social interaction but also instrumental in shaping identities and communities. Claire Lyons and John Papadopoulos summarize the complex issues addressed by this collection of essays. Four case studies illustrate the use of archaeological artifacts to reconstruct social structures. They include ceramic objects from Mesopotamian colonists in fourth-millennium Anatolia; the Greek influence on early Iberian sculpture and language; the influence of architecture on the West African coast; and settlements across Punic Sardinia that indicate the blending of cultures. The remaining essays look at the roles myth, ritual, and religion played in forming colonial identities. In particular, they discuss the cultural middle ground established among Greeks and Etruscans; clothing as an instrument of European colonialism in nineteenth-century Oceania; sixteenth-century Andean urban planning and kinship relations; and the Dutch East India Company settlement at the Cape of Good Hope.
Categories: Architecture

The Archaeology of Colonialism

The Archaeology of Colonialism

This volume examines human sexuality as an intrinsic element in the interpretation of complex colonial societies.

Author: Barbara L. Voss

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139503136

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 461

This volume examines human sexuality as an intrinsic element in the interpretation of complex colonial societies. While archaeological studies of the historic past have explored the dynamics of European colonialism, such work has largely ignored broader issues of sexuality, embodiment, commemoration, reproduction and sensuality. Recently, however, scholars have begun to recognize these issues as essential components of colonization and imperialism. This book explores a variety of case studies, revealing the multifaceted intersections of colonialism and sexuality. Incorporating work that ranges from Phoenician diasporic communities of the eighth century to Britain's nineteenth-century Australian penal colonies to the contemporary Maroon community of Brazil, this volume changes the way we understand the relationship between sexuality and colonial history.
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology of the Colonized

The Archaeology of the Colonized

This book investigates the experience of the colonized in their landscape setting, and proposes an 'archaeology of taxation' to investigate the relationship between local community and central control.

Author: Michael Given

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415369916

Category: Social Science

Page: 187

View: 622

This book investigates the experience of the colonized in their landscape setting, and proposes an 'archaeology of taxation' to investigate the relationship between local community and central control.
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology and History of Colonial Mexico

The Archaeology and History of Colonial Mexico

An archaeological and historical study of Mexico City and Xaltocan, focusing on the years after the 1521 Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.

Author: Enrique Rodríguez-Alegría

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107111646

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 973

An archaeological and historical study of Mexico City and Xaltocan, focusing on the years after the 1521 Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.
Categories: History

Archaeologies of Colonialism

Archaeologies of Colonialism

This book presents a theoretically informed, up-to-date study of interactions between indigenous peoples of Mediterranean France and Etruscan, Greek, and Roman colonists during the first millennium BC. Analyzing archaeological data and ...

Author: Michael Dietler

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520287570

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 399

This book presents a theoretically informed, up-to-date study of interactions between indigenous peoples of Mediterranean France and Etruscan, Greek, and Roman colonists during the first millennium BC. Analyzing archaeological data and ancient texts, Michael Dietler explores these colonial encounters over six centuries, focusing on material culture, urban landscapes, economic practices, and forms of violence. He shows how selective consumption linked native societies and colonists and created transformative relationships for each. Archaeologies of Colonialism also examines the role these ancient encounters played in the formation of modern European identity, colonial ideology, and practices, enumerating the problems for archaeologists attempting to re-examine these past societies.
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology and Colonialism

Archaeology and Colonialism

Publisher Description

Author: Chris Gosden

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521787955

Category: Social Science

Page: 186

View: 936

Publisher Description
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters

The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters

In this volume, ten archaeologists analyze the assumptions that have constrained previous studies of colonialism and demonstrate that colonization was common in early Old and New World state societies--an important strategy by which people ...

Author: Gil Stein

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 1930618433

Category: History

Page: 445

View: 153

Colonialism and its legacies have emerged as one of the most important research topics in anthropology. Indeed, we now understand that colonialism gave rise to and shaped the discipline. However, the understanding of colonization in anthropology, history, and other fields derives largely from studies of European expansion. In this volume, ten archaeologists analyze the assumptions that have constrained previous studies of colonialism and demonstrate that colonization was common in early Old and New World state societies--an important strategy by which people gained access to critical resources.
Categories: History

The Archaeology of Capitalism in Colonial Contexts

The Archaeology of Capitalism in Colonial Contexts

This work does not suggest a new theoretical framework as such, but rather suggests the importance of revising key theoretical terms employed within historical archaeology, arguing for new engagements with postcolonial theory of relevance ...

Author: Sarah K. Croucher

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461401925

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 369

The Archaeology of Capitalism in Colonial Contexts: Postcolonial Historical Archaeologies explores the complex interplay of colonial and capital formations throughout the modern world. The authors present a critical approach to this topic, trying to shift discourses in the theoretical framework of historical archaeology of capitalism and colonialism through the use of postcolonial theory. This work does not suggest a new theoretical framework as such, but rather suggests the importance of revising key theoretical terms employed within historical archaeology, arguing for new engagements with postcolonial theory of relevance to all historical archaeologists as the field de-centers from its traditional locations. Examining case studies from North America, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Australia, the Middle East, and Europe, the chapters offer an unusually broad ranging geography of historical archaeology, with each focused on the interplay between the particularisms of colonial structures and the development of capitalism and wider theoretical discussions. Every author also draws attention to the ramifications of their case studies in the contemporary world. With its cohesive theoretical framework this volume is a key resource for those interested in decolonizing historical archaeology in theory and praxis, and for those interested in the development of modern global dynamics.
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology of Native lived Colonialism

The Archaeology of Native lived Colonialism

In this book, Neal Ferris offers alternative explanations of colonial encounters that emphasize continuity as well as change affecting Native behaviors.

Author: Neal Ferris

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816527059

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 386

Colonialism may have significantly changed the history of North America, but its impact on Native Americans has been greatly misunderstood. In this book, Neal Ferris offers alternative explanations of colonial encounters that emphasize continuity as well as change affecting Native behaviors. He examines how communities from three aboriginal nations in what is now southwestern Ontario negotiated the changes that accompanied the arrival of Europeans and maintained a cultural continuity with their pasts that has been too often overlooked in conventional Òmaster narrativeÓ histories of contact. In reconsidering Native adaptation and resistance to colonial British rule, Ferris reviews five centuries of interaction that are usually read as a single event viewed through the lens of historical bias. He first examines patterns of traditional lifeway continuity among the Ojibwa, demonstrating their ability to maintain seasonal mobility up to the mid-nineteenth century and their adaptive response to its loss. He then looks at the experience of refugee Delawares, who settled among the Ojibwa as a missionary-sponsored community yet managed to maintain an identity distinct from missionary influences. And he shows how the archaeological history of the Six Nations Iroquois reflected patterns of negotiating emergent colonialism when they returned to the region in the 1780s, exploring how families managed tradition and the contemporary colonial world to develop innovative ways of revising and maintaining identity. The Archaeology of Native-Lived Colonialism convincingly utilizes historical archaeology to link the Native experience of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the deeper history of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century interactions and with pre-European times. It shows how these Native communities succeeded in retaining cohesiveness through centuries of foreign influence and material innovations by maintaining ancient, adaptive social processes that both incorporated European ideas and reinforced historically understood notions of self and community.
Categories: Social Science

An Archaeology of Colonial Identity

An Archaeology of Colonial Identity

" "This book is aimed primarily at archaeologists, but will also attract historians and those interested in cultural theory and material culture studies.

Author: Gavin Lucas

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780306485398

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 813

"An Archaeology of Colonial Identity examines how colonial identities were constructed in the Cape Colony of South Africa from its establishment in the 17th century up to the 20th century. It is an explicitly archaeological approach but one which also draws more widely on documentary material to examine how different people in the colony - from settler to slave - constructed identities through material culture." "This book is aimed primarily at archaeologists, but will also attract historians and those interested in cultural theory and material culture studies. Specifically, historical archaeologists and students of historical archaeology will be the primary readers of this volume."--Jacket.
Categories: History

Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology

Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology

This essential handbook explores the relationship between the postcolonial critique and the field of archaeology, a discipline that developed historically in conjunction with European colonialism and imperialism.

Author: Jane Lydon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315427683

Category: Social Science

Page: 525

View: 993

This essential handbook explores the relationship between the postcolonial critique and the field of archaeology, a discipline that developed historically in conjunction with European colonialism and imperialism. In aiding the movement to decolonize the profession, the contributors to this volume—themselves from six continents and many representing indigenous and minority communities and disadvantaged countries—suggest strategies to strip archaeological theory and practice of its colonial heritage and create a discipline sensitive to its inherent inequalities. Summary articles review the emergence of the discipline of archaeology in conjunction with colonialism, critique the colonial legacy evident in continuing archaeological practice around the world, identify current trends, and chart future directions in postcolonial archaeological research. Contributors provide a synthesis of research, thought, and practice on their topic. The articles embrace multiple voices and case study approaches, and have consciously aimed to recognize the utility of comparative work and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the past. This is a benchmark volume for the study of the contemporary politics, practice, and ethics of archaeology. Sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress
Categories: Social Science

Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology

Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology

This volume addresses the entanglement between archaeology, imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, and war.

Author: Bonnie Effros

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9781938770616

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 327

This volume addresses the entanglement between archaeology, imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, and war. Popular sentiment in the West has tended to embrace the adventure rather than ponder the legacy of archaeological explorers; allegations by imperial powers of "discovering" archaeological sites or "saving" world heritage from neglect or destruction have often provided the pretext for expanding political influence. Consequently, citizens have often fallen victim to the imperial war machine, seeing their lands confiscated, their artifacts looted, and the ancient remains in their midst commercialized. Spanning the globe with case studies from East Asia, Siberia, Australia, North and South America, Europe, and Africa, sixteen contributions written by archaeologists, art historians, and historians from four continents offer unusual breadth and depth in the assessment of various claims to patrimonial heritage, contextualized by the imperial and colonial ventures of the last two centuries and their postcolonial legacy.
Categories: Political Science

An Archaeology of the Margins

An Archaeology of the Margins

This book analyses the problematics of archaeological heritage management in the Canary Islands, which are echoed in other parts of the world where the indigenous heritage is under-represented.

Author: A. José Farrujia de la Rosa

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781461493969

Category: Social Science

Page: 119

View: 171

This book analyses the problematics of archaeological heritage management in the Canary Islands, which are echoed in other parts of the world where the indigenous heritage is under-represented. The present-day management of Canarian archaeological heritage has a very specific and unusual context given that the archipelago is located on the fringes of Europe, belonging to Spain and therefore to the European Unión, but geographically and in terms of early history being part of Africa. From a theoretical perspective, then, the proposed book analyzes issues such as the effects of colonialism and eurocentrism on the management of the archaeological heritage. It also examines the evolutionist and historico-cultural models used to analyze past societies and, ultimately, used to create identities that influence archaeological heritage management itself. From a practical point of view, the book presents a proposal for enhancing the archaeological heritage of the Canary Islands through the creation of archaeological parks (providing some concrete examples in the case of the city of La Laguna) and the active involvement of the local community. Parallel to this, the book considers the Canarian Archipelago as part of a problematic that is not unique to this area but is an example of poor indigenous heritage management overall. It demonstrates how the course of history and the politics of the past still have an excessive influence on the way in which the present-day archaeological heritage is interpreted and managed. Therefore, this book provides an almost unique opportunity for uncovering the history of archaeology within the margins of Europe (in fact, in an African region) and exploring colonial and foreign influences. In many ways it is a mirror of archaeological mainstreams and an exercise in (re)thinking the aim and status of present-day archaeology.
Categories: Social Science

Archaeology of Colonisation

Archaeology of Colonisation

Author: Carlos Rivera-Santana

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield International

ISBN: 9781786609014

Category: Social Science

Page: 202

View: 402

This book rethinks the history of colonisation by focusing on the formation of the European aesthetic ideas of indigeneity and blackness in the Caribbean, and how these ideas were deployed as markers of biopolitical governance. Using Foucault’s philosophical archaeology as method, this work argues that the European formation of indigeneity and blackness was based on aesthetically casting Aboriginal and African peoples in the Caribbean as monsters yet with a similar degree of Western civilisation and ‘culture’. By focusing on the aesthetics of the first racial imageries that produced indigeneity and blackness this work takes a radical departure from the current Social Darwinian theorisations of race and racism. It reveals a new connection between the global origins of colonisation and local post-Enlightenment histories.
Categories: Social Science

The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis

The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis

This book will be of considerable interest to scholars of the Spanish borderlands and gender politics."—Robert W. Preucel, coeditor of A Companion to Social Archaeology

Author: Barbara L. Voss

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520244924

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 759

"A clear and evocative demonstration of how historical archaeology, when done by a scholar of Voss's caliber, can contribute in a substantive and profound way to our understanding of colonialism."—Mary C. Beaudry, author of Findings: The Material Culture of Needlework and Sewing "The Archaeology of Ethnogenesis will become a model for research on identity in historical archaeology. Extremely well written and readable, it presents the results of original research in innovative ways."—Randall H. McGuire, author of A Marxist Archaeology "In her innovative archaeological study of shifting identities in Spanish California, Voss shows that the colonists of San Francisco used diverse material practices to establish a new Californio identity and legitimize their status as occupiers of a new land. This book will be of considerable interest to scholars of the Spanish borderlands and gender politics."—Robert W. Preucel, coeditor of A Companion to Social Archaeology
Categories: History

Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous Colonial Interaction in the Americas

Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous Colonial Interaction in the Americas

The Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous-Colonial Interaction in the Americas brings together scholars from across the hemisphere to examine how archaeology can highlight the myriad ways that Indigenous people have negotiated ...

Author: Lee M. Panich

Publisher:

ISBN: 0367222825

Category: America

Page: 592

View: 351

The Routledge Handbook of the Archaeology of Indigenous-Colonial Interaction in the Americas brings together scholars from across the hemisphere to examine how archaeology can highlight the myriad ways that Indigenous people have negotiated colonial systems from the fifteenth century through to today. The contributions offer a comprehensive look at where the archaeology of colonialism has been and where it is heading. Geographically diverse case studies highlight longstanding theoretical and methodological issues as well as emerging topics in the field. The organization of chapters by key issues and topics, rather than by geography, fosters exploration of the commonalities and contrasts between historical contingencies and scholarly interpretations. Throughout the volume, Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors grapple with the continued colonial nature of archaeology and highlight Native perspectives on the potential of using archaeology to remember and tell colonial histories. This volume is the ideal starting point for students interested in how archaeology can illuminate Indigenous agency in colonial settings. Professionals, including academic and cultural resource management archaeologists, will find it a convenient reference for a range of topics related to the archaeology of colonialism in the Americas.
Categories: America

The Archaeology of Southeastern Native American Landscapes of the Colonial Era

The Archaeology of Southeastern Native American Landscapes of the Colonial Era

A volume in the series the American Experience in Archaeological Perspective, edited by Michael S. Nassaney

Author: Charles R. Cobb

Publisher:

ISBN: 0813066190

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 286

View: 985

Native American populations both accommodated and resisted the encroachment of European powers in southeastern North America from the arrival of Spaniards in the sixteenth century to the first decades of the American republic. Tracing changes to the region's natural, cultural, social, and political environments, Charles Cobb provides an unprecedented survey of the landscape histories of Indigenous groups across this critically important area and time period. Cobb explores how Native Americans responded to the hardships of epidemic diseases, chronic warfare, and enslavement. Some groups developed new modes of migration and travel to escape conflict while others built new alliances to create safety in numbers. Cultural maps were redrawn as Native communities evolved into the groups known today as the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, Catawba, and Seminole peoples. Cobb connects the formation of these coalitions to events in the wider Atlantic World, including the rise of plantation slavery, the growth of the deerskin trade, the birth of the consumer revolution, and the emergence of capitalism. Using archaeological data, historical documents, and ethnohistorical accounts, Cobb argues that Native inhabitants of the Southeast successfully navigated the challenges of this era, reevaluating long-standing assumptions that their cultures collapsed under the impact of colonialism. A volume in the series the American Experience in Archaeological Perspective, edited by Michael S. Nassaney
Categories: Indians of North America

Domestic Architecture and Power

Domestic Architecture and Power

It is not coincidental that this is the intellectual climate in which historical archaeology is establishing itself in Central and South America.

Author: Ross W. Jamieson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780306471728

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 515

Historical archaeology, one of the fastest growing of archaeology’s sub fields in North America, has developed more slowly in Central and p- ticularly South America. Happily, this circumstance is ending as a gr- ing number of recent projects are successfully integrating textual and material culture data in studies of the events and processes of the last 500 years. This interval and this region–often called Ibero-America–have been studied for a century or more by historians with traditional perspectives and emphases focusing on colonial elites and large-scale politico-economic events. Such inclinations fit well into world-system and other core-peri- ery models that have had a major impact on historical thought since the 1970s. Over the past 20 years or so, however, world-system models have come under fire from historians, anthropologists, and others, in part because the emphasis on global trends and the growth of capitalism - nies the importance of understanding variability in local histories and circumstances. Historians have increasingly turned their attention to lo cal, rural, and domestic contexts, thereby illuminating the great diversity of responses to colonial domination that were played out in the vast arena of the Americas. It is not coincidental that this is the intellectual climate in which historical archaeology is establishing itself in Central and South America.
Categories: Social Science

Challenging Colonial Narratives

Challenging Colonial Narratives

Challenging Colonial Narratives demonstrates that the traditional colonial dichotomy may reflect an artifice of the colonial discourse rather than the lived reality of the past.

Author: Matthew A. Beaudoin

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816538089

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 503

Challenging Colonial Narratives demonstrates that the traditional colonial dichotomy may reflect an artifice of the colonial discourse rather than the lived reality of the past. Matthew A. Beaudoin makes a striking case that comparative research can unsettle many deeply held assumptions and offer a rapprochement of the conventional scholarly separation of colonial and historical archaeology. To create a conceptual bridge between disparate dialogues, Beaudoin examines multigenerational nineteenth-century Mohawk and settler sites in southern Ontario, Canada. He demonstrates that few obvious differences exist and calls for more nuanced interpretive frameworks. Using conventional categories, methodologies, and interpretative processes from Indigenous and settler archaeologies, Beaudoin encourages archaeologists and scholars to focus on the different or similar aspects among sites to better understand the nineteenth-century life of contemporaneous Indigenous and settler peoples. Beaudoin posits that the archaeological record represents people’s navigation through the social and political constraints of their time. Their actions, he maintains, were undertaken within the understood present, the remembered past, and perceived future possibilities. Deconstructing existing paradigms in colonial and postcolonial theories, Matthew A. Beaudoin establishes a new, dynamic discourse on identity formation and politics within the power relations created by colonization that will be useful to archaeologists in the academy as well as in cultural resource management.
Categories: Social Science